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Beer and cycling - Page 2

post #16 of 40
A long ride in the summer can often call for a short stop at the pub. After 2 jars I resume the ride but often find that shortness of breath becomes a factor. Is this a medical problem or am I just literally gasping for more?
post #17 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by tomUK
A long ride in the summer can often call for a short stop at the pub. After 2 jars I resume the ride but often find that shortness of breath becomes a factor. Is this a medical problem or am I just literally gasping for more?
Tom,
Good observations. The body is a remarkable thing. Throughout evolution, it has picked up the ability to seek the right fuels to get the job done. We are constantly bombarded by "information" telling us to only eat this or only drink this much. In obeying these whimsical instructions, we override our inherent ability in judging the "right measure".
You need to learn to trust your body. When you sat down and knocked over a couple of pints, it felt good, didn't it? That was your body telling you that you are doing the right thing in supplying it with the malt and hops that it requires to grow into a strong and healthy bike rider.
The shortness of breath that you feel is because you've engaged it on a health regime and then suddenly cut it short by jumping back on the bike. After 2 pints, you may have enhanced the malt levels in your small left toe, but you can hardly expect the body to have achieved a full recovery to the 3.52 to 3.78 Alpha-Malt levels that it requires in order to function efficiently.
The solution is to drink good wholesome beer until you can drink no more....and then drink some more. You will find that, at this stage, the world is your oyster (albeit an oyster that spins quite a lot more than you would normally expect a common garden-variety oyster to do). You are completely invincible (as long as someone holds you up) and ready for anything, even karaoke.
When you have had enough beer, you won't even remember to gasp. That is the "right measure".

Eoin (Well, I guess one more couldn't hurt) C
post #18 of 40
Eion -

I'm sure this is a question that many here would like to ask. Is it okay to drink beer while riding? On my mountain bike I would often find myself with two cages - one with a water bottle (filled with H20) and one with a can of lager. The problem I encountered was that while riding rough terrain the can would often 'bouce' out of the cage performing a little dance on it's slow-down to zero velocity. Obviously, this would be a two-fold pain. Firstly I would have to go and retrieve my dependence and secondly I would find that the spray factor could often become overwhelming upon opening the goods.

Do you have any suggestions to overcome this issue? I have thought about pouring the beer into a bottle prior to leaving home, however, this no doubt would leave it tasting like a can opened 12 hours previous - flat. I then thought about putting the malt in my camelback. This option excited me as I thought 3 litres is a good amount to be in possesion of, however, it too would suffer the fizz-less trouble.

Yours seekingly,
Tom
post #19 of 40

Re: Beer and cycling

I used to live in St Petersburg in Russia and developed a passion for alcohol. The stuff was everywhere, in shops, cafes, booths and even at work. One day they had a board-room meeting and ended the proceedings with a knees-up consisting of chocolate cakes and vodka. Needless to say, I left in a state of intoxication.
However, this made me feel guilty. I thought of all the athletes knocking themselves out in the sports centre, so I rushed to the stadium and decided to join them and train. I must have been crazy, to be honest, as it's dangerous to do sports with alcohol in the system.
Amazingly, my performance was to be applauded and I went through my entire routine through will-power alone.
My favourite beer in Russia was something called rasputinskayo (with a picture of Rasputin on the bottle). It cost just a few cents per bottle.
I also recall that once I met a Russian girl who asked me to buy her a bottle but I was astonished when she ripped the cap off with her teeth instead of needing a bottle-opener.
These days I don't drink much at all. However, I do believe that red wine is very beneficial so I stopped drinking beer and swapped to wine. Wine in moderation is also good for the heart and has helped reduce instances of cancer in Europe.
I don't think I would like to ride my bike fueled on alcohol but I wouldn't object to a couple of glasses after training.

Quote:
Originally posted by zaskar
I use to drink beer before i got serious about cycling. well today is friday and i have a 1 hour mountain time trial sunday morning.
if i drink say 3-6 beers today will it have a negative affect on my performance sunday am?? or how long does it take alcohol to get out of system? thanks.
post #20 of 40
When I was doing long distance touring, I would consume the best part of a bottle of wine at lunch, weave my way for half an hour then be right as rain. I remember one night of being totally paralytic, next morning crashing hangover, one hour of painful cycling and hangover gone. Nowadays I like to down a pint on a longish ride, certainly gives a fillip to things afterwards
post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by tomUK
Do you have any suggestions to overcome this issue?
This requires a very long post......
It is very heartening to see you taking this issue so seriously, Tom, and the questions you ask are at the very epicentre of practical and healthy cycling. There is no universal answer as there are so many different situations that we may find ourselves in. In order to make sense of the question of how to imbibe nutrients "during" a ride, it may be useful for us to break the solutions into 2 sections - On the bike and Off the bike:
On the bike - Very difficult, as you have pointed out.
(1) In terms of beer, lagers are probably the supplement of choice as the head tends to die off fairly quickly. One solution to the bubble dilema is to carry a wad of lard or goat fat in the side of your mouth - when you crack the can or bottle, stick your lard-coated tongue in and around the opening as quickly as you can. I usually carry 3 cans, each in a stubbie holder (or a rolled-up sock), in my jersey. The bottle-holders that bikes are festooned with these days were originally developed for carrying long-necks, but namby-pamby marketing has changed the shape of the plastic replica's along the way and a good 375ml stubby, long-neck or can, no longer fits securely. A bit of tool-time down in the shed can fix this problem and enhance the value of your bike.
(2) Switch to wine. Wine casks, as we call them (plastic foil-coated bag of wine inside a cardboard box), were originally developed for cycling and are the pre-cursor to the Camel-back. Red wine is the one to go for as it has the same effects as EPO, but is socially acceptable.
(3) For the longer training rides, I usually carry an 18 Gallon Keg on my back (good weighted training and gets lighter towards the end of the ride). I spike it just before I roll off down the road and have 4 or 5 outlets on coil-bound hose coming off it. As this is more than sufficient for my own needs, I often gather quite a pack around me. These rides tend to turn into very social events.
(4) When racing, my manager drives near me towing a Mini-Tanker (rescued from New Zealand after the totalitarian Government banned them). I just drop back for a top-up whenever I feel my reserves are dropping.
Off the bike - plenty of scope and no wet spots.
(1) It's easy - plan your ride. Mark out all the refuelling stops along the way. If mountainbiking, do fuel drops up in front. On the road, check out all the pubs along the route. Pay particular attention to the Al Fresco outlets. In Europe, many kiosks sell cold cans and, to minimise your stop, you can pre-pay the vendors so they have the beer ready to pass to you. Make these pick-up points like a Spot Sprint or King of the Mountains and you will find new vigour in your riding.

Eoin (Wow, my mega-malt levels have never been so high. This really is good Ale) C
post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by tomUK
Do you have any suggestions to overcome this issue?
Assuming I am able to attach the image to which I refer, an ideal solution is in the offing. This is the new Butanese Team Trials bike undergoing recent testing (all very hush-hush so don't go letting on that you know about it). It is believed that they have encountered a few problems with aerodynamics and the local constabulary, but it certainly looks like the way of the future.
Just like disc wheels and viagra, it may be a few years before we start seeing these in our LBS's, but there's nothing really stopping one from whacking together a similar edifice down in the shed.
Eoin (Anyone up for a 100 Pint TT?) C
LL
post #23 of 40
Quiet a machine. Let's hope Mr Armstrong doesn't find out about it before the tdf.

I *think* one maybe catching on to all the ideology behind being well hydrated. The phrase 'being dropped' so it now appears is not actually a shameful disgrace. Although, I must add there still appears to be such issues not so easily overcome. After gulping down plenty of the ale the bike steering seems to suffer any mishaps. Is this a form of envy being portrayed by the bike? Like jealousy being ousted by giving the rider poor control?

This can actually be a *VERY* dangerous occurrence. Once on our way home from a watering hole while on a cycling track a friend of mine suffered a nasty encounter - he was riding happily - mashing away at the pedals when the bike began to fight fiercely. Result - he ended up becoming intimate with a English bran bury bush. Needless to say his injuries were horrific, to run a parallel, the guy looked like he'd been ferociously attacked by a 2 week old kitten.

You learn from experience. When he rides these days after pints he remembers that day and knows at any time his own bike maybe read to attack.

I hope this story serves well to all you newbies out there. Remember when drinking and riding your bike is out to get you.
post #24 of 40

Friday Night - Time for Malto-loading

Hey, everyone, it's coming up to Friday Night (you Kiwi's are already there). Nearly time to drag out the Butanese Team Time-Trial Bike and get some training in! My body is craving those Health Supplements - mmmm, nice and cold!
I hope you all make a big effort to increase your Mega-malt levels tonight. Remember, the traffic lights are wrong - Amber means "Go".
Eoin (Well, if you reckon it'll help the hops farmers, I'll have one more) C
post #25 of 40
enjoy your supplements EoinC, powerade is my hydrato.r
post #26 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by deanabol
enjoy your supplements EoinC, powerade is my hydrato.r
"Powerade"? Sorry, don't know it. Is that a pilsner?

Eoin (the only bad beer is the one that gets away) C
post #27 of 40
Quote:
Originally posted by EoinC
"Powerade"? Sorry, don't know it. Is that a pilsner?
No, no, no - I heard that it is some sort of new wine thats being made. Weird marketing ploy - you got your reds & whites, but then there is supposedly some green & oranges offered. Not that I am a wine connoisseur myself - could never figure out that sipping thing - if its good - drink it.

Alcohol Abuse is
A) spilling your drink
B) not finishing your drink or
C) All of the above
post #28 of 40

A tad off topic

Quote:
Originally posted by SLS
Not that I am a wine connoisseur myself - could never figure out that sipping thing - if its good - drink it.
Absolutely - It reminds me of the story of a Wine Buff who took a woman to a restaurant, wanting to impress her with his vino knowledge....
WB - "Waiter - Bring me a '63 Lexia from the Grumphen Vineyard."
Waiter - "Certainly, Sir" - Trots off and comes back with the bottle. Pours WB a mouthful and waits for the acceptance.
WB - "Good Lord, Man, I asked for a '63 and that's a '62. Dontcha know that was the big frost? Take it away."
Waiter - "I'm sorry, Sir, you are correct." Takes bottle away and returns with a '63.
Later in the meal....
WB - "Waiter - Bring me a '72 Savignon Blanc from the Jacques Petrousse Winery."
Waiter - "Certainly, Sir" - Trots off and comes back with the bottle. Pours WB a mouthful and waits for the acceptance.
WB - "Good God, Man, that's from the Clement Petrousse Winery. Dontcha know that their vines only got some body in'74? Take it away."
Waiter - "I'm sorry, Sir, you are correct." Takes bottle away and returns with a Jacques Petrousse.
At the end of the meal, the Waiter comes up to the couple with a glass of White.
Waiter - "Excuse me, Sir, throughout the course of the evening, I couldn't help but be impressed with the extent of your knowledge of wines."
WB - "Well, my good Man, that sort of thing comes with experience, dontcha know."
Waiter - "Well, Sir, the other staff were wondering whether Sir would be able to place the origins of this drink?" Passes the glass to WB.
WB - Takes a mouthful and, choking, promptly blows it out through his nose. "Great Scott, Man, that tastes like piss!"
Waiter - "Right again, Sir, now how old am I?"

Eoin (real Powerade comes in Jugs) C
post #29 of 40

Re: A shad off shopic

Hard to believe - no sooner have we gotten over Friday night than Saturday night comes along. You've just got to love that! When it comes to Malt-based training regimens, this is definitely the healthy end of the week.
Eoin (2 Heads are better than 1. Make it 2 pints, thanks, Mate) C
post #30 of 40

Hey guys stay off the beer

This is pretty shocking stuff, shall have to start drinking lemonade
LL
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