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Hybrid bike for touring????

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I have a comfort (hybrid) bike that I’m planning on using for some tours of up to 7 days. I have done some long rides of 75/80 miles and felt very comfortable. Everything I’ve read from the experts say a hybrid bike is for riding around town and should not be used for touring. A good touring bike will run 700x35 tires. I have 700x35 tires. A good touring bike will have a triple 48x38x28 with a rear cassette of 12x34. I have a triple 48x36x26 with a rear cassette of 11x32. The only difference is in the handlebars. Instead of road style handlebars I have a semi flat bar with bar ends. Anyone out there using a Hybrid for long distance touring?

Thank you
Frank
post #2 of 17
Sounds absolutely perfect! Just get out there and ride!! As long as it can take the attachments to hold your luggage then you've got no problems...
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by MidBunchLurker
Sounds absolutely perfect! Just get out there and ride!! As long as it can take the attachments to hold your luggage then you've got no problems...
Thank you. I'll be using a BOB trailer.
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by frusso
Thank you. I'll be using a BOB

trailer.
Hybrid are excelent for around town and some short trips but I wont be taking it in a week or two tour. I ride a C300 Raleigh, panniers all around plus stack and got no complains.
post #5 of 17

Re: Hybrid bike for touring????

Quote:
Originally posted by frusso
I have a comfort (hybrid) bike that I’m planning on using for some tours of up to 7 days. I have done some long rides of 75/80 miles and felt very comfortable. Everything I’ve read from the experts say a hybrid bike is for riding around town and should not be used for touring. A good touring bike will run 700x35 tires. I have 700x35 tires. A good touring bike will have a triple 48x38x28 with a rear cassette of 12x34. I have a triple 48x36x26 with a rear cassette of 11x32. The only difference is in the handlebars. Instead of road style handlebars I have a semi flat bar with bar ends. Anyone out there using a Hybrid for long distance touring?

Thank you
Frank
It sounds like you have the basics already.
The comfort of the different hand positions and therefore the other anatomical body positions attained by drop bars are worth a lot to some people, self included, but I have seen and toured with others that had a bicyle equipped just as you plan.
There are some "drop style adapters" that can be added to semi-flat bars to give you a close approximation to the positions attained with standard road drop bars,,,... but I can't come up with the name right now.
Take your time and sort out as many of the other details... and realize that we all have things to learn.
post #6 of 17

Re: Re: Hybrid bike for touring????

Quote:
Originally posted by daveornee
It sounds like you have the basics already.
The comfort of the different hand positions and therefore the other anatomical body positions attained by drop bars are worth a lot to some people, self included, but I have seen and toured with others that had a bicyle equipped just as you plan.
There are some "drop style adapters" that can be added to semi-flat bars to give you a close approximation to the positions attained with standard road drop bars,,,... but I can't come up with the name right now.
Take your time and sort out as many of the other details... and realize that we all have things to learn.
The bars I was think of are Newk Bars. There is a picture of them:

<http://www.petercrandall.net/biketrip/html/gear.html>

It is not just about hand positions, it is about entire upper half of your body and what a differnce it makes on your weight distribution and use of leg muscles.
I don't know if these things are still available, but they are worth giving a try if you can find them. You don't change out your existing controls, so shifting and braking can't easily be done from the drops.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by trujillomig
Hybrid are excelent for around town and some short trips but I wont be taking it in a week or two tour. I ride a C300 Raleigh, panniers all around plus stack and got no complains.
Why?
post #8 of 17

Re: Hybrid bike for touring????

I've done road touring on a mountain bike for three years. It's not that fast and not that fancy, but we got along just fine. The be-all and end-all is whether you like touring on a hybrid, not what everybody else is doing.

Bravewolf
post #9 of 17
Folks road heavy English 3 speeds all over the world! Touring with a hybrid couldn't be any tougher than that. Pack up and hit the road-- Good luck!
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
During our long winters up here in Northern Pennsylvania I’ve spent many a nights on a few search engines looking for personal touring stories. There are a lot of pictures attached to the journals I found. I would say about half of those are pictures of people touring on a hard tail mountain bike. I guess its just personal preference. I have spent a few years racing my road bike and have ridden my share on centuries. Now as I get older (61) its time to slow down and smell the flowers. The biggest problem with my road bike, and maybe its because I’m getting older is running out of or having no berm. But on my hybrid with 700x35 wheels I hardy even notice. I think my gearing is adequate for the Pennsylvania hills and any others I may encounter. I can go as low as 26x32. I changed my stem and handle bar so my upper body is no longer in that upright position you normal see on a comfort bike. I’m now positioned a little more aerodynamic. Thank you for everyone’s input. If you happen to be driving or riding across Pennsylvania along scenic Route 6 (Bike Y Route) in early July and see a lone bike rider say hello. See you on the roads and ride safe.

Frank
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by frusso
... But on my hybrid with 700x35 wheels I hardy even notice. I think my gearing is adequate for the Pennsylvania hills and any others I may encounter. I can go as low as 26x32.

Frank
I wish to ask a "newbie" question as I am relatively new to biking. What is a 700x35 wheel? I have 26" wheels marked 726x4. What does your term 26x32 mean? Is it referring to the chain ring to the sprocket? I have 3 chain rings (of course) the largest having 48 teeth. Is this the reference point?
I think this is a hybrid bike though I am not sure. I picked it up at an auction for one dollar and took with me to Europe (Germany) where I am doing a lot of touring. Right or wrong, I am having a ball touring with whatever kind of bike this is. I took up the biking sport at the age of 55 so one can begin at any age. I have lots to learn, like what to take on a biking camping trip. I am trying to do this "Ultralite".
You sound like an experienced cyclest. Do you do much camping with your bike? I need more input for this sort of bike touring. Can you make suggestions?
LL
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by HeidelbergBarbi
I wish to ask a "newbie" question as I am relatively new to biking. What is a 700x35 wheel? I have 26" wheels marked 726x4. What does your term 26x32 mean? Is it referring to the chain ring to the sprocket? I have 3 chain rings (of course) the largest having 48 teeth. Is this the reference point?
I think this is a hybrid bike though I am not sure. I picked it up at an auction for one dollar and took with me to Europe (Germany) where I am doing a lot of touring. Right or wrong, I am having a ball touring with whatever kind of bike this is. I took up the biking sport at the age of 55 so one can begin at any age. I have lots to learn, like what to take on a biking camping trip. I am trying to do this "Ultralite".
You sound like an experienced cyclest. Do you do much camping with your bike? I need more input for this sort of bike touring. Can you make suggestions?
Looks like you got a good deal if you only paid one dollar for that bike. Looks to me like it is a mountain / off road comfort bike. Especially if it has 26 inch wheels. When I say I have 700x35 the 700cc is the diameter and the 35 is the width of the tire. As what you should take on you bike camping trip. I would take what ever you think you would need if you were going on a hiking trip. Tent, sleeping bag, change of clothes, food and so on. I guess it all depends how long you are going to be on the road. Don’t forget items for you bike. Extra tub, flat repair kit, pump, ect. Good luck
post #13 of 17

Re: Hybrid bike for touring????

Quote:
Originally posted by frusso
I have a comfort (hybrid) bike that I’m planning on using for some tours of up to 7 days. I have done some long rides of 75/80 miles and felt very comfortable. Everything I’ve read from the experts say a hybrid bike is for riding around town and should not be used for touring. A good touring bike will run 700x35 tires. I have 700x35 tires. A good touring bike will have a triple 48x38x28 with a rear cassette of 12x34. I have a triple 48x36x26 with a rear cassette of 11x32. The only difference is in the handlebars. Instead of road style handlebars I have a semi flat bar with bar ends. Anyone out there using a Hybrid for long distance touring?

Thank you
Frank
Last summer i used a trek hybrid for two week touring. It was from Portland, Maine to Quebec City. The bike handled ok, the only problem i had is that I couldn't bend las low as a touring bike. The bike can carry a lot of weight (i was carring about 30-40 punds in the back)
post #14 of 17

Re: Re: Hybrid bike for touring????

Quote:
Originally posted by cchs
Last summer i used a trek hybrid for two week touring. It was from Portland, Maine to Quebec City. The bike handled ok, the only problem i had is that I couldn't bend las low as a touring bike. The bike can carry a lot of weight (i was carring about 30-40 punds in the back)
Did you camp during that tour? That sounds like a great trip. Were there bike routes that you followed or did you take local roads for biking?
I have a poll going about bike touring and camping and need lots of advise about how others do long tours (one week or more)
What are your experiences?
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by HeidelbergBarbi
I wish to ask a "newbie" question as I am relatively new to biking. What is a 700x35 wheel? I have 26" wheels marked 726x4. What does your term 26x32 mean? Is it referring to the chain ring to the sprocket? I have 3 chain rings (of course) the largest having 48 teeth. Is this the reference point?
I think this is a hybrid bike though I am not sure. I picked it up at an auction for one dollar and took with me to Europe (Germany) where I am doing a lot of touring. Right or wrong, I am having a ball touring with whatever kind of bike this is. I took up the biking sport at the age of 55 so one can begin at any age. I have lots to learn, like what to take on a biking camping trip. I am trying to do this "Ultralite".
You sound like an experienced cyclest. Do you do much camping with your bike? I need more input for this sort of bike touring. Can you make suggestions?
Very interesting bicycle; it looks like it could be folded.
"700 X 35" refers to a tire size with the 700C diameter 622 mm bead seat diameter, and 35 refers to the width of 35 mm.
The term "26 x 32" is referring to 26 tooth front sprocket teeth and 32 rear cog teeth. This is a low gear suitable for climbing a rather steep grade with a touring load.
Camping on a bike is what "loaded touring" is about.
I suggest you start a new topic with any questions you have.
Some good starting articles:

<http://www.adventurecycling.org/features/howto.cfm>

<http://sheldonbrown.com/touring/index.html>

Your idea of "Ultralite" is very smart.
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