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Country Roads & DOGS - Page 4

post #46 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

Judging from the lenght of this thread, there must not be a single biker out
there that hasn't been chased by a dog or two.

I once had a weanie dog that would come out of his garage (door always left
about 6 inches from closed) to chase me as I rode by. One day he he was so
determined to harrass me he failed to see the car passing between us and he
turned into a weiner burger. Problem Solved!!!

They should all be that easy.
post #47 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS


> What a shame! Was the little dog a real problem to begin with?


I consider any dog that leaves his property to chase a biker a problem.
This particular dog would try to bite my feet as I peddled the bike by his
house. Most dogs will leave me alone after I give them a face full of
household ammoina, but this dog was too fast for that, and too persistant to
ignore.


> Catching you was just his Walter Mittie fantasy, like that cartoon of
> chickens dreaming they soar like eagles.


Catching me may have been a fantasy. I have a fantasy too! Mine is that
dog owners would obey the county leash laws.

> Dogs are okay, it's the insane straight truck drivers that give me the

shakes!

I'll agree with your concerns over insane truck drivers. The way these guys
treat bikers on the county roads in S/W Missouri will eventually leave one
or us laying on the road kinda line the afore mentioned weanie dog!!

Allen
>
>
>
post #48 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 18:08:18 -0400, Rick Onanian <spamsink@cox.net> wrote:

>On Fri, 09 Jul 2004 18:54:26 -0700, Bernie
><bmcilvan@mouse-potato.com> wrote:
>>Goat Roper wrote:
>>>I once had a weanie dog that would come out of his garage (door always left
>>>turned into a weiner burger. Problem Solved!!!
>>>

>>What a shame! Was the little dog a real problem to begin with?

>
>That breed is a problem, whether or not it chases bicycles.
>
>> Catching you was just his Walter Mittie fantasy, like that cartoon of
>>chickens dreaming they soar like eagles.

>
>They are more like retarded turkeys than chickens.
>
>>Dogs are okay, it's the insane straight truck drivers that give me the
>>shakes!

>
>Today, while taking the lane on a rural two-lane, got buzzed pretty
>close by a speeding tractor trailer.


Bet he had a story already in planning:

He came out of nowhere...
Suddenly swerved in front of me...
I didn't see him...
;-D

[Actually, according to that expose about how they do those long runs with
no sleep, I worry that the guy is already asleep or in some amphet.-induced
stupor.]

-B
post #49 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

Goat Roper wrote:
>> What a shame! Was the little dog a real problem to begin with?

>
> I consider any dog that leaves his property to chase a biker a
> problem. This particular dog would try to bite my feet as I peddled
> the bike by his house. Most dogs will leave me alone after I give
> them a face full of household ammoina, but this dog was too fast for
> that, and too persistant to ignore.
>
>
>> Catching you was just his Walter Mittie fantasy, like that cartoon
>> of chickens dreaming they soar like eagles.

>
> Catching me may have been a fantasy. I have a fantasy too! Mine is
> that dog owners would obey the county leash laws.
>
>> Dogs are okay, it's the insane straight truck drivers that give me
>> the shakes!

>
> I'll agree with your concerns over insane truck drivers. The way
> these guys treat bikers on the county roads in S/W Missouri will
> eventually leave one or us laying on the road kinda line the afore
> mentioned weanie dog!!


Yeah, maybe they should just give you "a face full of household ammoina
(sic)" instead?

Bill "bike riding not mortal combat, unless you want it to be" S.
post #50 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:35:43 GMT, "Goat Roper" <xxxxx@sssss.fffff>
wrote:

>as I peddled the bike by his house.


How much were you asking for it?
post #51 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

> Yeah, maybe they should just give you "a face full of household ammoina
> (sic)" instead?
>

Perhaps, but it wouldn't be the same unless I jump out of a ditch and try to
bite the driver ;-)))
post #52 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

"Zippy the Pinhead" <the_corporate_hose@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ck31f05ro736ttcbgiia69qua71iv15u0h@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 22:35:43 GMT, "Goat Roper" <xxxxx@sssss.fffff>
> wrote:
>
> >as I peddled the bike by his house.

>
> How much were you asking for it?
>


I guess you would have to get the dog's point of view on that one. But
wait, he is road kill so I guess we'll never find out for sure unless you
are willing to accept my testimony ;-)
post #53 of 79

Re: Country Roads & DOGS

Of course you are correct, but I would certainly sell my bike if I could
get enough to buy a better bike. The flattened dog, on the other hand, lost
all material value in the instant that he was ambushed by the car's front
left tire.

Allen
post #54 of 79

I have a little experience with this and I have a method that has always worked for me.  It is a little odd though and some people would rather be chased by dogs then to try this but here goes. Go down to the store and buy a really good water gun.  Before you go out riding again fill it up with your own urine (take a pee into it).   When the dog chases you, squirt him in the eyes and nose real good. 99 times out a hundred, the dog will never chase you again and will most likely run and hide from you.  This is because dogs use urine to demonstrate dominance and are extremely sensitive to it's smell.  The ammonia in human urine will burn the dogs eyes, but the sent of the person's urine will be programed into the dogs brain and it will instinctively fear that person and in some cases all people.  This has never failed to work for me.  But I have to warn you that even though it will not harm the dog (it is simply using it's natural instincts against it), there are few owners that will complain that their trained watch dog is no longer any good because it runs and hides from people now. Not that this has ever happened to me. Ha Ha Ha! (Evil laugh)  It is also not a good idea to stop and innocently ask the owner of the dog why his watch dog runs and hides under the car when you ride by. LOL!

post #55 of 79

I consider myself somewhat of an expert on what not to do if chased by a dog, having been bitten 8 times over they past few years.

 

  1. Do not ignore an attacking dog.
  2. Don't try to outrun him unless you are sure you can do it.
  3. If trying to spray with water or noxious chemicals, make sure your aim is true, even when pedaling hard.
  4. If you kick and miss you may get bitten, or fall down, or both.
  5. If there are more than1 dog, don't pay so much attention to the one snarling and snapping that you don't see the quiet one sneaking up behind you. (same as #1)

 

Yelling sometimes works and is worth a try, you can always switch to a backup plan.

 

Getting of the bike and using it as a shield/weapon is probably the best, but be prepared for a long siege, some dogs don't give up easily.  If the dog(s) aren't too close, bending down to pick up a rock (real or imaginary) often works wonders.  If there is a nice stick handy, you can usually dispense with the bike as defense and go on the offense.  Dogs recognize and (most) respect a good offense.

post #56 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleexplorer View Post

I have a little experience with this and I have a method that has always worked for me.  It is a little odd though and some people would rather be chased by dogs then to try this but here goes. Go down to the store and buy a really good water gun.  Before you go out riding again fill it up with your own urine (take a pee into it).   When the dog chases you, squirt him in the eyes and nose real good. 99 times out a hundred, the dog will never chase you again and will most likely run and hide from you.  This is because dogs use urine to demonstrate dominance and are extremely sensitive to it's smell.  The ammonia in human urine will burn the dogs eyes, but the sent of the person's urine will be programed into the dogs brain and it will instinctively fear that person and in some cases all people.  This has never failed to work for me.  But I have to warn you that even though it will not harm the dog (it is simply using it's natural instincts against it), there are few owners that will complain that their trained watch dog is no longer any good because it runs and hides from people now. Not that this has ever happened to me. Ha Ha Ha! (Evil laugh)  It is also not a good idea to stop and innocently ask the owner of the dog why his watch dog runs and hides under the car when you ride by. LOL!


I just jump off my bike and grab the angry animal and carry them off to the front door of their owners house.  By this time the dog is screaming angry and will tear the living shoot out of the first thing they can clamp thier mouth on.  Please note I get bit quite often during the process. I kick open the front door and toss the dog in the house and leave. 
 

post #57 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleexplorer View Post

I have a little experience with this and I have a method that has always worked for me.  It is a little odd though and some people would rather be chased by dogs then to try this but here goes. Go down to the store and buy a really good water gun.  Before you go out riding again fill it up with your own urine (take a pee into it).   When the dog chases you, squirt him in the eyes and nose real good. 99 times out a hundred, the dog will never chase you again and will most likely run and hide from you.  This is because dogs use urine to demonstrate dominance and are extremely sensitive to it's smell.  The ammonia in human urine will burn the dogs eyes, but the sent of the person's urine will be programed into the dogs brain and it will instinctively fear that person and in some cases all people.  This has never failed to work for me.  But I have to warn you that even though it will not harm the dog (it is simply using it's natural instincts against it), there are few owners that will complain that their trained watch dog is no longer any good because it runs and hides from people now. Not that this has ever happened to me. Ha Ha Ha! (Evil laugh)  It is also not a good idea to stop and innocently ask the owner of the dog why his watch dog runs and hides under the car when you ride by. LOL!


I just thought about this and it hit me. Save the 99 cents for the squirt gun and really put the fear into the dog and jump off your bike and urinate right on it.ROTF.gif
 

post #58 of 79
Quote:


I just thought about this and it hit me. Save the 99 cents for the squirt gun and really put the fear into the dog and jump off your bike and urinate right on it.ROTF.gif
 



Are you sure that exposing the family jewels in front of a blood thirsty dog is what you want to do just to save a buck?  Then again it might just save you a thousand dollar trip to the urologist for a vasectomy!  ROTF.gif  

 

But if more bike riders would get a concealed gun license, they could just shoot the dog.  Then maybe more dog owners would keep their dogs controled. I personally have never owned a dog that has ever bitten a human.  I just won't tolerate it.  I was attacked by two pit bulls when I was 6 years old while riding.  They got me by each leg and bit me up pretty bad.  The owners were two teenage boys that were watching and laughing up until they saw that their dogs were going to kill me and they called them off.  They left me their injured and bleeding.  I had to ride my bike for over a mile with a flat tire to get home.  My dad called the Sheriff and had the dogs destroyed.  Back in those days that is what happened to any dog that attacked a human.  I was utterly terrified of dogs for years until I realized that my fear was activating their natural instinct to hunt.  Dogs are not regular domestic animal.  They are wild animals that were domesticated long ago for use as hunting aids.  99% of all original breeds of dogs were bred for a specific hunting purpose, not for cuddly pet purposes.  This means that they are still dominated by their wild instincts to hunt and kill.  Dogs have hyper senses and can detect when you are afraid of them.  But they also can detect when you are mad and angry.  When I discovered this, I converted my utter fear of them into a boiling rage and hatred for an aggressive dog.  It is amazing what happens when a snarling dog comes at you and then detects that you are emotionally enraged and are about to kill it.  In most cases the dog will sense that they have gone from the hunter to the hunted and run away.  But this only works with untrained dogs.  It does not work on trained attack dogs and mentally retarded dogs.  But this technique has saved me from several potential dog attacks.  Although it takes a lot of mental strength to control one's emotions when you are confronted by a blood thirsty dog.  That is why I came up with the conversion technique of converting fear into rage, it's much easier to do.  But don't think I am not serious about killing the dog if it bites me.  I really will and the dog can sense that.  You can't fake a dog out.  You have to mean it or it won't work.  No dog has ever lived that has ever attacked me or one of my family or friends.  And that goes for any animal.  A couple of years ago one of my roosters spurred a 4 year old girl.  3 minutes later it was missing it's head. It made some good chicken and dumpling, which the little girl thoroughly enjoyed.  I do not tolerate animals that attack humans.

post #59 of 79

Things I have learned to do in dealing with dog attack:

 

Using a "command voice," saying firmly but loudly, STOP!

 

If I can't avoid or get away, I use the bicycle as a shield between me and the dog.

 

Sprays are a mild deterrent to a dog and may make them more aggressive.  (I have had dogs back off when I hit them with some pepper spray though)

 

I carry a stick in my back pocket that I whittled a blunt point on.  I use it to either whack their snout or poke them in the nose with if it becomes necessary.  In the cases that I had to take it out, because of a dog, the dog sees it and backs off.

 

If attacted by multiple dogs (dog pack) I try to discern which is the alpha and beta dogs (leader and number two) and make my defensive moves to discourage them and if I am effective the rest will probably stop their attack.

 

I have thousands of bicycle miles on and off road.  City and country and, imo, city can be as bad and even worse than country.  Off-roading a mountain bike in parks (city, county, state, and national) has a high rate of dog attack for me, because many people allow their dogs to run loose there (illegally).  (I don't ride in dog parks)  smile.gif

post #60 of 79

Most working breeds descend from Mastiffs, including many herding breeds.  Just getting away from the breed-specific ignorance that often fuels dog discussions.

 

Likely - you rolling by is triggering the dog's "prey drive" and he's chasing because his brain tells you to.  I'm not sure where you live, but here, even in rural areas, you simply can't have a dog that can run off your property (chasing or not) and bother other people.  I mean - it happens for sure, but you at least have legal recourse.

However, in my experience, dogs mostly chase for the fun of chasing.  They're bored, and you're triggering their natural instinct (especially herding breeds), to chase something.  Tail carriage is a great indicator of their intentions, though even that isn't always accurate.  How do they look chasing?  Running/barking, and tails wagging?  Tails straight up and stiff?  Hackles up?

 

I won't say "I guarantee," but I'm fairly confident that with most of those dogs, you could simply stop, and they'd run up without attacking you, sniff you a bit, and lose interest.  

 

As was said earlier though, if you can out-run, then do so. :)

 

The absolute worst thing you could do is have another dog running with you - especially any Mastiff (a "thug-breed" that will always be in the wrong, regardless of who is the agressor). I say that as the owner of a Rottweiler, and someone who knows that certain breeds will always be wrong (even though breed-specific thinking is rubbish).  The last thing dogs should be encouraged to do, is "stand up" to one another, especially if your dog is the visiting team.

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