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Friction shifting Vs Index

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have bikes that have both.
Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with
my friction shifter I can always get it just right.
Might sound crazy but does anyone PREFER friction??
post #2 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

28 Sep 2004 01:16:27 GMT,
<20040927211627.29600.00001455@mb-m29.aol.com>,
fx199@aol.com (Fx199) wrote:

>Might sound crazy but does anyone PREFER friction??


My Shimanot thumb shifters can go either way. But, after trying
indexed shifting for a few months, I left them in friction mode.
And I don't much like my SRAM twist grips either.
OTOH, I love my Campagnolo bar cons.
--
zk
post #3 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

"Fx199" <fx199@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040927211627.29600.00001455@mb-m29.aol.com...
> I have bikes that have both.
> Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with
> my friction shifter I can always get it just right.
> Might sound crazy but does anyone PREFER friction??


I've recently purchased 2, virtually unused, old bikes, both with friction
shifters. I rode both for a while, as they were, just to reacquaint myself
with 25 year old technology. It was OK, but not really fun. I think a bike
should "disappear beneath you", and these drivetrains didn't do that at
all. Some index shifting gets a bit balky and vague, but I've found bar-end
shifters to be always crisp and precise. After converting these old bikes
they were a joy to ride, before that, they were a bit of a chore.
post #4 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

I prefer friction for the front and index for the rear.
post #5 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

On 28 Sep 2004 01:16:27 GMT, Fx199 wrote:

> I have bikes that have both.
> Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with
> my friction shifter I can always get it just right.
> Might sound crazy but does anyone PREFER friction??


It's ok when you're sitting down and have plenty of time to
fiddle around, but try it when you're standing or sprinting.
Indexing makes it possible to shift whenever you like.

--
bpo gallery at http://www4.tpgi.com.au/users/mvw1/bpo
post #6 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

ad6mj wrote:
> I prefer friction for the front and index for the rear.


Must...resist. Must...resist.

Bill "restraint" S.
post #7 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

"maxo" <maxo@NOSPAMhome.se> wrote in message
newsan.2004.09.28.16.03.27.527949@NOSPAMhome.se...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 01:16:27 +0000, Fx199 wrote:
>
> > I have bikes that have both.
> > Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with my

friction
> > shifter I can always get it just right. Might sound crazy but does

anyone
> > PREFER friction??

>
> Index is great, I'm especially taken with bikes that have internal hub
> gearing and indexing--totally lets you focus on the road.
>
> My road bike is friction because I like the simplicity of it and the
> virtually silent shifting. The reliability is a huge plus. I do use a
> modern cassette and chain, which helps shifting enormously.


Yes, but modern cassettes are designed to shift easily, making them more
prone to unintended shifts if not perfectly centered.

> Being able to
> get replacement parts for a couple bucks is nice.


Other than "brifters", index shifting parts are pretty cheap these days.
The difference between a friction-only DT shifter and an indexed/friction
selectable one is trivial.

> I ride alone and do ride
> fast, but if I miss one out of a hundred shifts, it's not going to kill

me
> to adjust the lever--I'm not in that much of a hurry.


It may bite you if you're standing and your chain skips.
post #8 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 16:05:39 +0000, maxo wrote:

> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 01:16:27 +0000, Fx199 wrote:
>
>> I have bikes that have both.
>> Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with my
>> friction shifter I can always get it just right. Might sound crazy but
>> does anyone PREFER friction??


I used to think that, before IĀ got indexed shifters. Of course, some of
it depends on the kind of indexed shifter you get; downtube indexed
shifters would be less of an improvement than "brifters".

But since I got Ergo shifters, I would never consider going back.

> My road bike is friction because I like the simplicity of it and the
> virtually silent shifting.


Who? Silent? I used to ride in groups back when we all had friction.
Rattle-rattle, scrape, ping. Missed shifts were common, as were the
poorly adjusted derailleur that just made weird noises.

> The reliability is a huge plus.


Something else contrary to my experience. My old Campy Record shifters
were constantly in need of adjustment. The resistance would never stay
where it should be, and usually would work loose, causing autoshifts.
I haven't even thought about adjusting my road bike shifters since I
serviced the bike last Winter.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Arguing with an engineer is like mud wrestling with a pig... You
_`\(,_ | soon find out the pig likes it!
(_)/ (_) |
post #9 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:35:01 +0000, Peter Cole wrote:

>> fast, but if I miss one out of a hundred shifts, it's not going to kill

> me
>> to adjust the lever--I'm not in that much of a hurry.

>
> It may bite you if you're standing and your chain skips.


Fortunately, though, you can't shift friction shifters while standing.
Bad idea, anyway, but your hands are pulling on the bars, not giving you a
chance to reach down to the levers. Shifting while standing is something
no one considered until we got brifters. Most modern systems
tolerate such abuse fairly well, but it is abuse. Choose your gear before
you get out of the saddle.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and
_`\(,_ | Excellence.
(_)/ (_) |
post #10 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

Doesn't anyone here ride off road? I can't imagine what it would be like to
try downshifting on a steep hill with technical terrain without indexing.
If you ride off road, and your indexing is not spot on, you work on the bike
before the next ride!
post #11 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

"David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote in message
newsan.2004.09.28.17.59.13.367174@lehigh.edu...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:35:01 +0000, Peter Cole wrote:
>
> >> fast, but if I miss one out of a hundred shifts, it's not going to

kill
> > me
> >> to adjust the lever--I'm not in that much of a hurry.

> >
> > It may bite you if you're standing and your chain skips.

>
> Fortunately, though, you can't shift friction shifters while standing.
> Bad idea, anyway, but your hands are pulling on the bars, not giving you

a
> chance to reach down to the levers. Shifting while standing is something
> no one considered until we got brifters. Most modern systems
> tolerate such abuse fairly well, but it is abuse. Choose your gear

before
> you get out of the saddle.


Sure, but was I was thinking of was the case where you shift (badly) then
stand & have the chain skip. This sort of thing always seemed to happen in
rolling hill climbs where you downshift seated, then soon after stand to
muscle over the top. In those cases autoshifts always seemed to happen at
the worst time -- when you were putting out maximum force on the pedals.
post #12 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

"maxo" <maxo@NOSPAMhome.se> wrote in message
newsan.2004.09.28.18.23.03.422164@NOSPAMhome.se...
> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 13:56:08 -0400, David L. Johnson wrote:
>
> >> My road bike is friction because I like the simplicity of it and the
> >> virtually silent shifting.

> >
> > Who? Silent? I used to ride in groups back when we all had friction.
> > Rattle-rattle, scrape, ping. Missed shifts were common, as were the
> > poorly adjusted derailleur that just made weird noises.
> >

>
> Yes, absolutely silent. Silent running, almost imperceptable shifts.


The only way I could tell my friction shift was good was by ear -- trim it
until it quiets down. Index shifting just goes "click".
post #13 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 19:40:57 GMT, Peter Cole
<peter_cole_no_spam_at_all@comcast.net> wrote:

> "maxo" <maxo@NOSPAMhome.se> wrote in message
> newsan.2004.09.28.18.23.03.422164@NOSPAMhome.se...
>> On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 13:56:08 -0400, David L. Johnson wrote:
>>
>> >> My road bike is friction because I like the simplicity of it and the
>> >> virtually silent shifting.
>> >
>> > Who? Silent? I used to ride in groups back when we all had friction.
>> > Rattle-rattle, scrape, ping. Missed shifts were common, as were the
>> > poorly adjusted derailleur that just made weird noises.
>> >

>>
>> Yes, absolutely silent. Silent running, almost imperceptable shifts.

>
> The only way I could tell my friction shift was good was by ear -- trim
> it
> until it quiets down. Index shifting just goes "click".
>
>


Having had both, I'd never to back to friction shifting.

--
Bob in CT
Remove ".x" to reply
post #14 of 29

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

On 28 Sep 2004 01:16:27 GMT, Fx199 <fx199@aol.com> wrote:

> I have bikes that have both.
> Often an index shifter will be vauge or ratchet, whereas with
> my friction shifter I can always get it just right.
> Might sound crazy but does anyone PREFER friction??


Yes. I like to twiddle it until it sounds right. Hate automatics
in cars too since I want to do the thinking and not the geartrain.
Bill Baka

--
Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 

Re: Friction shifting Vs Index

>Subject: Re: Friction shifting Vs Index
>From: maxo maxo@NOSPAMhome.se
>Date: 9/28/2004 11:05 AM US


>Index is great, I'm especially taken with bikes that have internal hub
>gearing and indexing--totally lets you focus on the road.



What bike would that be exactly??
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