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MTB transport in a pickup truck

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What is the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike. I could just lay it down, like I used to do with my BMX bikes, but I'm concerned that this might damage a mountain bike. Seems like the downward pedal/crank will be pushed upward creating stress against the frame via the bottom bracket. Admitadely, I'm not an engineer; can't determine if this is a valid concern. Is this practice OK? I have seen some carriers - bars that mount across the bed with receptacles for the front fork - that I like, but are pretty expensive. After buying a bike, helmet and some other odds and ends, it's tough for me to come up with another $100+ for a carrier. Is that the only way to go? Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Ferdinand wrote:
> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What is
> the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup
> truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike. I could
> just lay it down, like I used to do with my BMX bikes, but I'm
> concerned that this might damage a mountain bike. Seems like the
> downward pedal/crank will be pushed upward creating stress against the
> frame via the bottom bracket. Admitadely, I'm not an engineer; can't
> determine if this is a valid concern. Is this practice OK? I have
> seen some carriers - bars that mount across the bed with receptacles
> for the front fork - that I like, but are pretty expensive. After
> buying a bike, helmet and some other odds and ends, it's tough for me
> to come up with another $100+ for a carrier. Is that the only way to
> go? Thanks in advance.
>
>



Throw it in the back. Just don't throw it too hard. It'll be OK.



miles
post #3 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

don't just lie it down, it'll slide around too much in the back of your
truck, I know from experience. if you don't have a bedliner, it will
scratch up the bed and also do some cosmetic damage to the bike (pedals,
bars, fork, frame). not too much danger of damaging your bike via the
BB but why risk it.

the cheapest way to secure it for transport is motorcycle tie-downs to
the handlebars (Home Depot, about $15). this works quite well but won't
prevent theft if you need to park it anywhere...if you don't want to
mount a skewer-type mount in your truck bed (which is a little better
and locks are available), they have these removable bars that press
against the inside of your truck bed walls and you can secure the front
fork to those as well. I don't know a price but it's fairly inexpensive.

good luck,
bri

Ferdinand wrote:

>I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What is
>the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup
>truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike. I could
>just lay it down, like I used to do with my BMX bikes, but I'm
>concerned that this might damage a mountain bike. Seems like the
>downward pedal/crank will be pushed upward creating stress against the
>frame via the bottom bracket. Admitadely, I'm not an engineer; can't
>determine if this is a valid concern. Is this practice OK? I have
>seen some carriers - bars that mount across the bed with receptacles
>for the front fork - that I like, but are pretty expensive. After
>buying a bike, helmet and some other odds and ends, it's tough for me
>to come up with another $100+ for a carrier. Is that the only way to
>go? Thanks in advance.
>
>
>
>


--

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post #4 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Shawn wrote:

> I have two of these:
> http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...e.cfm?SKU=3702
> bolted to a 2x4. If I forget where I put the "rack", I lay the bikes
> down in the bed. No big deal. I figure if the bike can't handle
> bouncing along in the back of a truck, I don't want to ride it down a
> trail at 30 mph. I do try to avoid pedals in spokes or laying them on
> their derailleurs, but its never been a problem.



oh yeah...derailleurs. I knew I forgot something else important, if you
continually just lay the bike down instead of carry it in the back the
right way. ;-)

sort of important, anyway (yeah yeah, no need for SS people to bark up,
we know you're there)

bri
--

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post #5 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Shawn wrote:
> Ferdinand wrote:
>> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What
>> is the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup
>> truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike.


repost: Canadian style
http://www.specialtyoutdoors.com/misc/IMG_1808w.jpg
post #6 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

"Ferdinand" <Ferdinand.1eibom@no-mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote in
message news:Ferdinand.1eibom@no-mx.forums.cyclingforums.com...
>
> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What is
> the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup
> truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike. I could
> just lay it down, like I used to do with my BMX bikes, but I'm
> concerned that this might damage a mountain bike. Seems like the
> downward pedal/crank will be pushed upward creating stress against the
> frame via the bottom bracket. Admitadely, I'm not an engineer; can't
> determine if this is a valid concern. Is this practice OK? I have
> seen some carriers - bars that mount across the bed with receptacles
> for the front fork - that I like, but are pretty expensive. After
> buying a bike, helmet and some other odds and ends, it's tough for me
> to come up with another $100+ for a carrier. Is that the only way to
> go? Thanks in advance.
>
>
> --
> Ferdinand
>


Just lay it down, derailleur side up and bungee the front and rear so if you
slam on the brakes it doesn't come through the rear window. I have a rubber
bed mat to keep it from sliding around. I have a long cable and lock so I
can lock it to the truck through the eyelits when needed. This all works
great, until you try to haul more than one bike.
post #7 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Try a 2x10 with two or three of these bolted to it:
http://www.deltacycle.com/images/hit.../suvsllock.jpg

I've been using this setup for about 15 years, it's inexpensive, and
it works well.

JD
post #8 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

"Pete" <ptr@ThievingBastardsWorkAt_usaf.com> wrote in message news:<ab%dd.15316$ra2.6260@fe1.columbus.rr.com>...
> "Ferdinand" <Ferdinand.1eibom@no-mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote
>
> >... it's tough for me
> > to come up with another $100+ for a carrier. Is that the only way to
> > go? Thanks in advance.

>
> I built a lattice-type rack out of scrap 2x4 and 2x6.
>
> 2x6 spaced to hold the back wheel(s), bungie cord to hold the bike(s)
> steady.


Bungie cords are a trip. Remember that pic of the dude who got his
eye put out by one when he was using one to secure a bicycle? If
you're going to use bungies, wear glasses.

JD
post #9 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

miles todd wrote:
> Ferdinand wrote:
>> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What
>> is the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a pickup
>> truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike. I could
>> just lay it down, like I used to do with my BMX bikes, but I'm
>> concerned that this might damage a mountain bike. Seems like the
>> downward pedal/crank will be pushed upward creating stress against
>> the frame via the bottom bracket. Admitadely, I'm not an engineer;
>> can't determine if this is a valid concern. Is this practice OK? I
>> have seen some carriers - bars that mount across the bed with
>> receptacles for the front fork - that I like, but are pretty
>> expensive. After buying a bike, helmet and some other odds and
>> ends, it's tough for me to come up with another $100+ for a carrier.
>> Is that the only way to go? Thanks in advance.
>>
>>

>
>
> Throw it in the back. Just don't throw it too hard. It'll be OK.
>
>
>
> miles


Yup, wouldn't want to damage the truck.

The bike can handle the small amount of pressure exerted on it when it's
laying down.

Gary
post #10 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

small change wrote:
> Shawn wrote:
>> Ferdinand wrote:
>>> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this: What
>>> is the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a
>>> pickup truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike.

>
> repost: Canadian style
> http://www.specialtyoutdoors.com/misc/IMG_1808w.jpg


Just don't make a hard left turn!

Gary
post #11 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

GeeDubb wrote:
> small change wrote:
>> Shawn wrote:
>>> Ferdinand wrote:
>>>> I'm back into biking after a long hiatus. My question is this:
>>>> What is the least expensive way to transport a bike in the bed of a
>>>> pickup truck (F-150) without significant risk of damaging the bike.

>>
>> repost: Canadian style
>> http://www.specialtyoutdoors.com/misc/IMG_1808w.jpg

>
> Just don't make a hard left turn!
>
> Gary


It's very solid. The mat is maybe 1.5" rubber floor mat, and those bikes
are rock solid. Moving pads or old carpet would work in a pinch. That set up
belongs to my shuttling friends, and it has seen an awful lot of dirt
roads.

Penny
post #12 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Shawn says:

>If a manufacturer isn't designing to accommodate rack use they deserve
>every class action lawsuit they get. Being on a rack is part of being a
>bike.
>BTW, I've never heard of a failure of the bike due to being on a rack,
>not that I go searching for such info.


When you think about it, not many modern cars (and certainly no trucks) can
achieve a 1g-plus cornering acceleration, which makes even the most radical
manoeuvre when rack-mounted only about 41% more than holding the bike out
sideways using its tyres. If your fork can't handle this, don't try
braking....

Steve
post #13 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck


I take the reason for the manufacturer doing this is that the fork is
designed to receive a shock upwards and backwards EVENLY DISTRIBUTED AT THE DROPOUTS.


Hi, ever heard of turning?


Try this, lie under your bike with the front wheel removed holding onto each
leg at the dropouts. Then get someone to pull sideways at say 1 kg (2.2lb)
force on the bars. Hard to hold? Try them pushing down or pulling up on the
bars at 1 kg (2.2lb) force...Easy to resist?
The dropouts are not designed for this. The dropouts will experience
compression on one side and extension on the other, after a time whatever,
that is, the dropouts will fatigue that is why I take it the warrantee will
not be honoured.


Okay, now you try this. Ride your bike really fast down a hill while turning left and right, dodging boulders and trees.
Think about it, every time you turn there is a sideways force on the fork.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

Thanks all for the responses - several good points that I hadn't yet considered. I made my first trip with the bike on its side, held in position with rope. I am going to cut some rope, etc in order to be able to haul it standing up with the front wheel in place. Seems to minimize the risk of damage, plus I can show off my bike. I don't plan to leave it unattended, but an considering installing an eye or two to cable to deter theft.
post #15 of 17

Re: MTB transport in a pickup truck

DP wrote:
> "JD" <dij@usafcct.com> wrote in message
> news:ebf270c9.0410221238.7a9140ca@posting.google.com...
>> Try a 2x10 with two or three of these bolted to it:
>> http://www.deltacycle.com/images/hit.../suvsllock.jpg
>>
>> I've been using this setup for about 15 years, it's inexpensive, and
>> it works well.
>>
>> JD

>
> I built basically the same setup but I don't need to take the wheel
> off. Fit's in the back of my Ranger pickup perfecly. Matter of fact
> built a second for my wife!


Er, you mean her bike, right?

Bill "well, pickups ARE practical" S.
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