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First ride review: Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart 20.6 mile ride.

post #1 of 56
Thread Starter 
Bought this bike from Walmart when I returned the Roadmaster Mountain
Fury. Checked Schwinn Sidewinder out at Walmart before buying. NO
problems noted and yes, I checked the pedals this time. Took it home,
adjusted the seat, added $9 Schwinn cyclometer from Walmart and my GPS
mount for the Garmin Etrex Legend. Pumped tires to 65psi. Bike weighs a
ton and is a few pounds heavier than the Roadmaster Mountain Fury. But I
did not buy this bike to ride in pelotons, I bought it to commute and
for exercise.

Did the 20.6 miles today including a several 100 feet climb within a
mile and some dirt roads. Bike performed almost perfectly. Gears shifted
without any problems, brakes worked outstanding. Bike rode real quiet
except for the 26x1.9 tires humming on the road. Bike seemed faster on
the dirt roads than the paved roads but probably just my perception. The
bike has a front suspension fork but I really don't see the point in it
on this bike. Only minor problem was the end of the front derailleur
cable stuck out a little bit and kept hitting the pedals making the
annoying (click, click, click sound each time the pedal hit). Corrected
by taking a taking a trash bag twisty and connecting the cable to the
frame. Might have to adjust the seat angle slightly. This bike performed
great in my opinion on this first ride. Maybe I got a lemon for the
Roadmaster Mt Fury as someone else had good reports on it. I'll report
after I reach 100 miles on it.
post #2 of 56

Re: First ride review: Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart 20.6 mile ride.

keep a log.
come back after 1000 miles
and after yawl take the hubs apart to check bearings and cones.
post #3 of 56

Re: First ride review: Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart 20.6 mile ride.

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 14:26:14 -0500, PSB <noemail@spam.com>
wrote:

>Bought this bike from Walmart when I returned the Roadmaster Mountain
>Fury. Checked Schwinn Sidewinder out at Walmart before buying. NO
>problems noted and yes, I checked the pedals this time. Took it home,
>adjusted the seat, added $9 Schwinn cyclometer from Walmart and my GPS
>mount for the Garmin Etrex Legend. Pumped tires to 65psi. Bike weighs a
>ton and is a few pounds heavier than the Roadmaster Mountain Fury. But I
>did not buy this bike to ride in pelotons, I bought it to commute and
>for exercise.
>
>Did the 20.6 miles today including a several 100 feet climb within a
>mile and some dirt roads. Bike performed almost perfectly. Gears shifted
>without any problems, brakes worked outstanding. Bike rode real quiet
>except for the 26x1.9 tires humming on the road. Bike seemed faster on
>the dirt roads than the paved roads but probably just my perception. The
>bike has a front suspension fork but I really don't see the point in it
>on this bike. Only minor problem was the end of the front derailleur
>cable stuck out a little bit and kept hitting the pedals making the
>annoying (click, click, click sound each time the pedal hit). Corrected
>by taking a taking a trash bag twisty and connecting the cable to the
>frame. Might have to adjust the seat angle slightly. This bike performed
>great in my opinion on this first ride. Maybe I got a lemon for the
>Roadmaster Mt Fury as someone else had good reports on it. I'll report
>after I reach 100 miles on it.


Dear PSB,

At first I considered challenging you to a duel over your
boast that your Schwinn Sidewinder is a few pounds heavier
than my Fury Roadmaster, but then I looked at the
specifications:

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=1913343

Good God! Your Sidewinder's shipping weight is 50 pounds,
while my poor little Fury ships at only 40 pounds:

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...304#long_descr

My trusty steed tipped the electronic scales at a veterinary
office at a svelte 34.2 pounds with its sidestand,
water-bottle frame, and reflectors stripped off.

I long to know whether your Sidewinder exceeds forty pounds.

Carl Fogel
post #4 of 56
Thread Starter 

Re: First ride review: Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart 20.6 mileride.

I'll try to get a weight for the bike minus the rear rack I just put on
it. There's not doubt, my bike is a tank. Maybe it will last like one.
post #5 of 56

Re: First ride review: Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart 20.6 mile ride.

yeah, the log.
i have a bicyclists mag calendar.
gee, when did i redo the headset? june? Sept? hmmm

in the roadtest genre-
one uses a checklist for each part and system with categories following
for what it does
so at the time it used to do that, you'll see it happening and know why
it did it
not the secondary effects
(you know the expletive deleted drives a camino with the door bottoms
rusting out?
that's a secondary effect)
so when you ride, you can check the parts function and wear off-
rear wheel now 1/64th loose at rear axle, out 1/4 at rim 1/17/05
rear wheel now 3/32 at RAx, out 3/4 at rim 1.20.05
rear wheel falls off
1.20.05
post #6 of 56

Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Once upon a time, Schwinn bikes were incredibly durable and low maintenance.
You couldn't break them. We mountain biked the hilly trails east of Kansas
City long before mountain biking was officially invented. My friends Sears
or Huffy bikes were always falling apart.

But like so many products before, labels that meant quality over many
decades can be turned into big profits by slapping them onto junk.

The manufacturers of Department store bikes know the average cheap bike is
ridden about 75 miles in its lifetime. So if you design a bike that will
last 750, you are designing it for 10 times the average lifespan. I've seen
this with the bearings, cranks, etc. coming apart for the rare DS bike that
sees real use.

On the other hand, I've ridden at least 7,500 miles on my latest quality
bike. I've replaced one spoke. Speaking of maintenance, people obsess
about the few hours a year I spend fixing flats (I used to too, to be
honest) but will spend a few hours a month cleaning their cars. Cars get
dirty, bikes get flats, it is the way.

What saddens me is the masses think spending one or two car payments on a
bike is silly, so they buy heavy, poor handling, braking, shifting bikes;
which only reinforce the illusion that bikes are crap in general.

Saddest yet are these rules are applied in spades to kids bikes, because
they spend even less on a bike the kid will outgrow. So kids learn the myth
from early childhood. That's why you see parents hauling their little kids
in their cars to the park, where they drive around little electric cars.

I have often wondered how such people reconcile news about the Tour de
France, where cyclists zip all over France in two weeks, but somehow the act
like riding your bike 5 miles to work is like crossing the Andes.



<datakoll@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104954365.967185.308660@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> keep a log.
> come back after 1000 miles
> and after yawl take the hubs apart to check bearings and cones.
>
post #7 of 56
Thread Starter 

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Ron Hardin has more miles on his Huffys. I also know many roadies who
reguarly spend 100's a year just on maintenance of their $2,000 bikes.
In fact, if these expensive bikes were so unbreakable, LBS'es would be
out of business by the droves as repairs fuel the LBS, not bike sales.

I know the LBS in my area has a week long wait to repair bicycles and
nearly all of them are non-department store bikes. Sure seems to be a
lot of high ends bikes that need fixing doesn't it?

I am so glad you are an exception to the rule about high end bicycles.

:-)
post #8 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

"PSB" <noemail@spam.com> wrote in message
news:2g1Dd.14597$7N4.6188@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> Ron Hardin has more miles on his Huffys. I also know many roadies who
> reguarly spend 100's a year just on maintenance of their $2,000 bikes.
> In fact, if these expensive bikes were so unbreakable, LBS'es would be
> out of business by the droves as repairs fuel the LBS, not bike sales.
>
> I know the LBS in my area has a week long wait to repair bicycles and
> nearly all of them are non-department store bikes. Sure seems to be a
> lot of high ends bikes that need fixing doesn't it?
>
> I am so glad you are an exception to the rule about high end bicycles.
>
> :-)


My $300 Ibex Corrida is about a hundred times more well built and performs
better than a $150 Wal - Schwinn. I've seen bikes at my LBS for not much
more than at a big box store---I guess people don't research their
purchases. :-)
post #9 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 02:37:29 GMT, "Gooserider"
<noway@mousepotato.com> wrote:

[snip

>My $300 Ibex Corrida is about a hundred times more well built and performs
>better than a $150 Wal - Schwinn. I've seen bikes at my LBS for not much
>more than at a big box store---I guess people don't research their
>purchases. :-)


Dear Gooserider,

Out of curiosity, is your Ibex Corrida about a hundred times
cheaper, a hundred times faster, a hundred times lighter, or
a hundred times more reliable than my $57.71, 19 mph
average, 32-pound, one-flat-in-10-months-and-1200-miles Fury
Roadmaster?

Or is its superiority only one order of magnitude?

:-) (This is a technical newsgroup, after all, so research
is a two-edged sword.)

:-) (I do expect that your bike is nicer.)

Carl Fogel
post #10 of 56
Thread Starter 

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Gooserider wrote:

>
> My $300 Ibex Corrida is about a hundred times more well built and performs
> better than a $150 Wal - Schwinn.


So I assume you have owned a Schwinn from Walmart for quite some time
then to make such a statement? I didn't think so. We'll see if my
Schwinn holds up to the test of time. Maybe it won't. I'll keep posting
reports on the progress just like others have on their store bought bikes.

http://www.ibexbikes.com/Stacks/Series_Corrida.html

Shows your bike to be a road bike. While you would kick my ass on a
paved road, let's take your bike vs my bike on a dirt sandy road here in
South Carolina. You won't make it half a mile. See, I bought my bike
for the roads I ride on. A road bike don't cut it.

But the one thing I noticed, people who actually ride department store
bikes on this group have little problems with them. Carl Fogel, Ron
Hardin among others. Nor do they spend $100's of dollars each year at
the LBS for tune ups, truings, etc. like many of the roadies who ride
high priced bikes do.
post #11 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

> Concerning the maintenance requirements of a bicycle, it's a mystery to
> me why more cyclists don't take the chore upon themselves.


A. It requires fine motor skills
B. It requires patience
C. It's not fun
D. Actually, it's downright BORING. Boring, boring, boring.
E. It takes up valuable time that could be spent reading posts on Usenet.

I hope this clears up the mystery for you.


--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
Home of the meditative cyclist:
http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
post #12 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

"Luke" <luca@ca.inter.net> wrote in message
news:050120052303421295%luca@ca.inter.net...
>
> Concerning the maintenance requirements of a bicycle, it's

a mystery to
> me why more cyclists don't take the chore upon themselves.

Adjusting
> derailleurs and brakes; chain, chainring and cassette

replacement;
> trueing wheels; adjusting cones; etc.; these can be

accomplished with a
> minimal investment in tools and learning. A beauty of the

bicycle is
> its sympathy to the backyard mechanic.
>

Time and money are limited resources. Sometimes one resource
is more limited than another.

I don't change the oil in my car any more, either.
post #13 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Haston
Once upon a time, Schwinn bikes were incredibly durable and low maintenance.
You couldn't break them. We mountain biked the hilly trails east of Kansas
City long before mountain biking was officially invented. My friends Sears
or Huffy bikes were always falling apart.

But like so many products before, labels that meant quality over many
decades can be turned into big profits by slapping them onto junk.

The manufacturers of Department store bikes know the average cheap bike is
ridden about 75 miles in its lifetime. So if you design a bike that will
last 750, you are designing it for 10 times the average lifespan. I've seen
this with the bearings, cranks, etc. coming apart for the rare DS bike that
sees real use.

On the other hand, I've ridden at least 7,500 miles on my latest quality
bike. I've replaced one spoke. Speaking of maintenance, people obsess
about the few hours a year I spend fixing flats (I used to too, to be
honest) but will spend a few hours a month cleaning their cars. Cars get
dirty, bikes get flats, it is the way.

What saddens me is the masses think spending one or two car payments on a
bike is silly, so they buy heavy, poor handling, braking, shifting bikes;
which only reinforce the illusion that bikes are crap in general.

Saddest yet are these rules are applied in spades to kids bikes, because
they spend even less on a bike the kid will outgrow. So kids learn the myth
from early childhood. That's why you see parents hauling their little kids
in their cars to the park, where they drive around little electric cars.

I have often wondered how such people reconcile news about the Tour de
France, where cyclists zip all over France in two weeks, but somehow the act
like riding your bike 5 miles to work is like crossing the Andes.



<datakoll@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104954365.967185.308660@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> keep a log.
> come back after 1000 miles
> and after yawl take the hubs apart to check bearings and cones.
>
I used to break parts on my Schwinn Varsity constantly, although not rims. My friends on Sears road bikes were constantly breaking rims, but everything else stayed together. When I got to college, I got a Sears, worked fine till the rust from outdoor parking took it's toll.
post #14 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Robert Haston wrote:

> Saddest yet are these rules are applied in spades to kids bikes, because
> they spend even less on a bike the kid will outgrow. So kids learn the myth
> from early childhood. That's why you see parents hauling their little kids
> in their cars to the park, where they drive around little electric cars.


Argh, I want to scream when I see these idiot parents with those stupid
cars.

Yet explaining to a parent why they shouldn't buy that $50 bike at
Target or Wal-Mart bike, and should spend $150 at a bike shop, is
fricking impossible!

And sure as sh-t, since you (or I) are considered the free bike repair
person for an extended family, we'll be called upon to try to get that
$50 Target or Wal-Mart bike on the road.

Now I should state that Costco is selling some decent bikes, not for
$50, but for around $150; the assembly sucks, but the components are
equivalent to the low end $250 bike shop bikes.
post #15 of 56

Re: Sad Story: was Schwinn Sidewinder from Walmart

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSB
Ron Hardin has more miles on his Huffys. I also know many roadies who
reguarly spend 100's a year just on maintenance of their $2,000 bikes.
In fact, if these expensive bikes were so unbreakable, LBS'es would be
out of business by the droves as repairs fuel the LBS, not bike sales.

I know the LBS in my area has a week long wait to repair bicycles and
nearly all of them are non-department store bikes. Sure seems to be a
lot of high ends bikes that need fixing doesn't it?

I am so glad you are an exception to the rule about high end bicycles.

:-)
dude there are a ton of faults in your reasoning. there is no way you can deem walmart bikes and high-end performance bikes comparable due to the fact that you see a lot of high-end bikes in for repairs at the local LBS. people who decide to invest a crapload of money on a bike are sure to ride many more miles and would therefore be in need of repairs. the fact that you mentioned in your first post that you would update us after you hit 100 miles is a testament to that. i'd put money down that the average owner of a bike that costs more than $2000 does 100 miles the first day on his or her new bike.

anyway, i'm not picking a fight, enjoy your new ride.
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