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Road cycling Etiquette

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
post #2 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerdz
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
Never draft anyone you do not know. Drafting behind a car is possibly illegal where you are and always dangerous.Cars stop much more quickly than a bike.
When you pass announce "on your left" or "passing on your left".
Meeting another cyclist,this could have variations but I would recommend pulling along side and commenting about their bike or their bike equipment.
This is always a good point of mutual interest.
Of course there are those that do not wish to stop as they may be in a training mode and don't want to break their rhythm.
post #3 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerdz
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
I have drafted and shared pulls with people I do not know, but do always speak up and don't draft someone that doesn't want you there. Some people are quite nervous about having someone they do not know following them closely. If you are going to draft it is also polite to offer to share pulls on the front if you can.

As far as introducing yourself to an older person, that I think is more culturally linked than bicycle linked. I don't personally feel that I can't talk to older or younger people, men or women, that I don't know, but we don't have a lot of social rules here that dictate that kind of thing. I'm going to make an assumption here that you are pretty young. If you would like to meet some more experienced riders, but don't feel you should initiate contact with older folks, maybe you can find a local bicycling club?

Have lots of fun with your new bike!!
post #4 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eden
I have drafted and shared pulls with people I do not know, but do always speak up and don't draft someone that doesn't want you there. Some people are quite nervous about having someone they do not know following them closely. If you are going to draft it is also polite to offer to share pulls on the front if you can.

As far as introducing yourself to an older person, that I think is more culturally linked than bicycle linked. I don't personally feel that I can't talk to older or younger people, men or women, that I don't know, but we don't have a lot of social rules here that dictate that kind of thing. I'm going to make an assumption here that you are pretty young. If you would like to meet some more experienced riders, but don't feel you should initiate contact with older folks, maybe you can find a local bicycling club?

Have lots of fun with your new bike!!
I agree. I'll draft off anyone who's faster than me (pretty much everyone). But, you always ask or announce that you are there. Like Eden said, some people, including me, do not like someone just tagging along, three inches off of your rear tire.
As far as passing, I always try to make some noise before I get within "On your left" range. That way they don't freak out if they are not paying attention.
As to drafting behind an automobile...I think Jan Ullrich said it best, three or four days ago, when he said: "OUCH!!" "GOTT in Himmel!!"
post #5 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

I was drafting off a big guy that was as fast as me, this weekend on PCH. He didn't seem to mind, but in that PCH can be very dangerous, I didn't want to just chime in with a yell to announce myself, for fear of startling him. Which, on PCH at the wrong time of day can be fatal. No joke.
Is there a standard call out for drafting like saying "On your left" when passing?
post #6 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

I always call out "Passing on your left!" and then greet with "Hi, good morning!" (or whatever) as I do. If I'm getting passed, I'll also initiate "hi". Bicyclists are mostly all friendly and out there for the same reasons.

Drafting anyone closely seems pretty scary, and definitely no tailgating cars. I'm not sure I'd even notice the benefit at my speeds (15-24 mph)?
post #7 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

drafting behind cars is a must!

and if you get the chance to overtake anthing with four wheels, take it.


I live in the countryside.. but i ride into towns to play with the traffic
post #8 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerdz
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
Do not draft off of vehicles. You will likley run into the rear of a car one day when the drive turns or hits the brakes for an emergency.

Also announce your presence when you over take someone. Say hi or just wave your hand as you pull along side.

Also DO NOT draft off a faster rider without asking permission. Many riders, myself included DO NOT want inexperienced riders drafting from us. It is just a safety concern. I have been taken down by inexperinced riders (couldn't keep his speed under control and hit my wheel going downhill) and broke several ribs and had blood in my right lung due to it and had to sit out the whole race season. Needless to say i only participate in group rides of people i know.
post #9 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerdz
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
In my place, when we pass someone, we just slow down a bit and säy " bai maayong buntag/hapon) hi good morning/afternoon which ever applies. if he nods then he´s a snob. Just concentrate on your and continue. If he replies then you maybe able to start a conversation with him. This way you may learn something bike-related mostly.
Best is to find a group during your rides and im sure that group would be more than willing to share what you need to know.
DRAFTING BEHIND A VEHICLE IN THE PHILIPPINES - I WOULD HIGHLY SUGGEST NOT TO. BETTER BE IN FRONT OF THE VEHICLE AND LET HIM DO THE DRAFTING. MORE SAFER DI BA?
post #10 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by complience
drafting behind cars is a must!

and if you get the chance to overtake anthing with four wheels, take it.


I live in the countryside.. but i ride into towns to play with the traffic
If you like traffic, you'd love it here in Renton, Washington!
post #11 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpenrose
If you like traffic, you'd love it here in Renton, Washington!
Ha! Imagine how congested it is here, in So Cal.
post #12 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Hey Alpenrose, what are you doing in Renton? At least you have the Cedar River Trail, huh? I do most of my commuting on I-90 (hence my screen name).

Seeing your screen name was a real blast from the past for me. I grew about four miles from Alpenrose, and used to hang out over there all the time as a kid, way back in the early 70s.

While I agree that drafting vehicles is too dangerous and usually a mistake, the idea that a car can stop faster than a bicycle is ridiculous. To that I say, get your brakes fixed!
post #13 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Always share your Balut at the rest stops.
post #14 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

It isn't me advocating drafting cars!

Yes, I picked the name for the Alpenrose Dairy, where I won my first bicycle racing medal back in '63, on a dirt track, with my 3-speed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ike90
Hey Alpenrose, what are you doing in Renton? At least you have the Cedar River Trail, huh? I do most of my commuting on I-90 (hence my screen name).

Seeing your screen name was a real blast from the past for me. I grew about four miles from Alpenrose, and used to hang out over there all the time as a kid, way back in the early 70s.

While I agree that drafting vehicles is too dangerous and usually a mistake, the idea that a car can stop faster than a bicycle is ridiculous. To that I say, get your brakes fixed!
post #15 of 16

Re: Road cycling Etiquette

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerdz
Hello all!!

I've started roadcycling just this month after getting my new Giant-OCR3. I'm just curious about cycling etiquette which would apply to the following:
a. Co-riders
1. If you happen to catch up to a cyclist, and want to overtake him/her, do you do as cars do, meaning pass through the left side?
2. Say you want to introduce yourself, and the other rider is an older person, is it polite to initiate the gesture?
3. Do you have to ask permission to draft with a rider you dont know?


b. Vehicles
1. Is drafting behind a van or car appropriate?


I'm sure these situations seem weird, but in the Philippines, some riders can be snobs, and i just need some advice on how to handle it.
Thanks a lot.
1. It is preferred to pass on the left and definitely some vocal warning is essential - the rider is usually unaware of your presence.
2. I do not enjoy conversation while riding since it is dangerous, especially in a group - I get annoyed when others do and have seen unpleasant results (luckily not serious). Still, when riding alone without too much traffic and not too fast it is acceptable.
3. Here in Israel the roadies community is relatively small but growing fast. In the past drafting casually was common, today it is expected to ask permission. When I join a group I do not know I always stay behind, at least for a while. When riding downhill I always keep a dinstance from other riders.

As for drafting cars: Some of my best friends do, I resent it very much since it is highly dangerous, especially if the driver is unaware of your presence. The car's breaks are far better than yours, in addition to the total absence of response time. A year ago one of the country's leading cyclers got hit by a bus while drafting a car in front of that bus.
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