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how much dha in sardines?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
how much dha do sardines have? thanks
post #2 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

You had better hope there isn't much, if you are eating them.

For example:

"...addition of cod liver oil to to the diet elevated the rate of
peroxidation by 20-fold."

And that was on top of the 10-fold increase over rats on the fat free
diet (when corn oil was added.

Source: from the text of the following:

Free Radic Biol Med. 1988;5(2):95-111.

A role for dietary lipids and antioxidants in the activation of
carcinogens.

Gower JD.

Division of Comparative Medicine, Clinical Research Centre, Harrow,
Middlesex, U.K.

The ways in which dietary polyunsaturated fats and antioxidants affect
the balance between activation and detoxification of environmental
precarcinogens is discussed, with particular reference to the
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo(a)pyrene. The structure and
composition of membranes and their susceptibility to peroxidation is
dependent on the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of the cell
and its antioxidant status, both of which are determined to a large
degree by dietary intake of these compounds. An increase in the PUFA
content of membranes stimulates the oxidation of precarcinogens to
reactive intermediates by affecting the configuration and induction of
membrane-bound enzymes (e.g., the mixed-function oxidase system and
epoxide hydratase); providing increased availability of substrates
(hydroperoxides) for peroxidases that cooxidise carcinogens (e.g.,
prostaglandin synthetase and P-450 peroxidase); and increasing the
likelihood of direct activation reactions between peroxyl radicals and
precarcinogens. Antioxidants, on the other hand, protect against lipid
peroxidation, scavenge oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive
carcinogenic species. In addition some synthetic antioxidants exert
specific effects on enzymes, which results in increased detoxification
and reduced rates of activation. The balance between dietary
polyunsaturated fats, antioxidants and the initiation of carcinogenesis
is discussed in relation to animal models of chemical carcinogenesis
and the epidemiology of human cancer.

Biochemist Ray Peat has cited much older studies, such as how dogs fed
fish oil all died of cancer:

"Fifty years ago, it was found that a large amount of cod liver oil in
dogs' diet increased their death rate from cancer by 20 times, from the
usual 5% to 100%. A diet rich in fish oil causes intense production of
toxic lipid peroxides, and has been observed to reduce a man's sperm
count to zero. [H. Sinclair, Prog. Lipid Res. 25, 667, 1989.]"

Source: http://www.healthythyroid.com/vegetableoils.htm

Stop listening to the hype (mostly from people who want to sell you
supplements) and start doing your own thinking and research!
post #3 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

On 22 Aug 2005 17:31:07 -0700, "montygram" <nazztrader@lycos.com>
wrote:
>
>You had better hope there isn't much, if you are eating them.
>
>For example:
>
>"...addition of cod liver oil to to the diet elevated the rate of
>peroxidation by 20-fold."
>


Maybe peroxidation of of fish oils is a good thing? For example:
http://www.jacn.org/cgi/content/abstract/14/4/325
post #4 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

If you read the Gower study, you will understand why this is not the
case. A healthy body will adapt, and sometimes idiot researchers use
this to say that something "raises antioxidant levels," but that cannot
be sustained. First, vitamin E levels fall, then SOD activity picks
up, but then there's not enough selenium, magnesium, zinc, etc. and
cancer's on its way. Or something else that's worse. Gower explains
how the omega 3 and 6 PUFAs activate processes that generate
carcinogens in vivo. He shows that this does not happen when animals
are fed butter or coconut oil. If you are serious about this, stop
posting and start reading. Your local library can probably get you a
copy of this study, or perhaps a local university library has it.
After you read it, then post back what your thoughts are.
post #5 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

Here's the abstract of the study you cite. From the abstract, it
sounds like the kinds of papers I've been citing for years. If you
think they are saying that consuming fish oil is not potentially
dangerous, please quote the exact statement. Fish oil in general is so
unstable that cancer cells can't use it to grow. As I've stated many
times here, fish oil appears to be similar to chemotherapy, that is,
poison. If you think it's so great, go ahead and subject yourself to
chemotherapy - that's what eating more than small amounts of fish oil
does to your body. The evidence is there, and what I cited above is
just the tip of the evidenciary iceberg here. Yes, it's true that if
you eat massive amounts of the right antioxidants, you might be able to
avoid damaging yourself, but nobody knows exactly how to do this.
Since there is no evidence to suggest that fish oil should be consumed
for any reason (except to inhibit arachidonic acid metabolization,
which can be accomplished in far safer ways), the only reason to do so
is because the snake oil salesmen of yesterday have become the fish oil
salesmen of today. So if you keep eating a high PUFA diet, that fish
oil might come in handy - it will be a lot cheaper than chemotherapy,
and in a nation like the USA, with no healthcare for tens of millions,
that's not something to sneeze at.

Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol 14, Issue 4 325-335,
Copyright © 1995 by American College of Nutrition

JOURNAL ARTICLE
Fish oil, lipid peroxidation and mammary tumor growth

M. J. Gonzalez
University of Puerto Rico, School of Public Health, Dept. Human
Development, San Juan 00936.

There is evidence that the level and especially the type of dietary fat
can be an important determinant of mammary tumor development and
growth. Diets containing high levels of fish oil have been shown to
inhibit or suppress mammary tumor growth. Various mechanisms have been
proposed to explain this modulatory activity of dietary fish oil or
fats in general on tumor growth; of special interest is lipid
peroxidation. The oxidation of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
present in fish oil, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and
docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can produce an array of secondary products
of lipid oxidation that may possess a cytostatic or cytolytic capacity.
post #6 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

montygram wrote:
> You had better hope there isn't much, if you are eating them.


If you are NOT going to answer the question then don't reply, Dim-Wit.

The rule of thumb is that two or 3 servings of a cold water fatty fish
like sardines, provides all the Omega-3 EFAs any human being needs.

You need them, but the actual required amount is quite small.

Exercise does a better job of reducing inflammation then taking
excessive amounts of Omega-3 EFAs does. Simply cut off excess
consumption of your Omega-6 FAs by STOP eating junk food.

Further, trying to chronically control your cholesterol blood levels by
taking huge amounts of fish oil capsules, in lieu of exercising, is
just plain stupid in my humble opinion.
post #7 of 7

Re: how much dha in sardines?

On 22 Aug 2005 17:31:07 -0700, "montygram" <nazztrader@lycos.com>
wrote:

>You had better hope there isn't much, if you are eating them.


You'd best ignore montygram.

Enjoy some sardines.
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