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How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I wanted to share this.

My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
chunks, I was ready to give up.

So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
one I tried worked beautifully.

I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
parts water to 1 part detergent.

Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.

Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
disappeared.

I didn't know it could be so easy.

-A
post #2 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

axlq wrote:

> I wanted to share this.
>
> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>
> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
> one I tried worked beautifully.
>
> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>
> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>
> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
> disappeared.
>
> I didn't know it could be so easy.
>
> -A

Hmph! I just use a heavy sprinkling of baking soda with a little
water and let sit. Bring to a boil and everything comes off. It's a
lot cheaper and does a better job.
post #3 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

~patches~ wrote:
> axlq wrote:
>
>> I wanted to share this.
>>
>> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
>> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
>> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
>> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
>> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>>
>> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
>> one I tried worked beautifully.
>>
>> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
>> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
>> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>>
>> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>>
>> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
>> disappeared.
>>
>> I didn't know it could be so easy.
>>
>> -A

>
> Hmph! I just use a heavy sprinkling of baking soda with a little water
> and let sit. Bring to a boil and everything comes off. It's a lot
> cheaper and does a better job.



I use lye to dissolve burnt food in stainless steel pans. I'd use
washing soda, but it seems to have totally disappeared from the stores.

-Bob
post #4 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

zxcvbob wrote:

> ~patches~ wrote:
>
>> axlq wrote:
>>
>>> I wanted to share this.
>>>
>>> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
>>> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
>>> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
>>> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
>>> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>>>
>>> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
>>> one I tried worked beautifully.
>>>
>>> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
>>> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
>>> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>>>
>>> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>>>
>>> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
>>> disappeared.
>>>
>>> I didn't know it could be so easy.
>>>
>>> -A

>>
>>
>> Hmph! I just use a heavy sprinkling of baking soda with a little
>> water and let sit. Bring to a boil and everything comes off. It's a
>> lot cheaper and does a better job.

>
>
>
> I use lye to dissolve burnt food in stainless steel pans. I'd use
> washing soda, but it seems to have totally disappeared from the stores.
>
> -BB

Bob, talking about plain old fashioned baking soda you know the kind
you bake with not washing soda.
post #5 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

~patches~ wrote:
> zxcvbob wrote:
>>
>> I use lye to dissolve burnt food in stainless steel pans. I'd use
>> washing soda, but it seems to have totally disappeared from the stores.
>>

>
> Bob, talking about plain old fashioned baking soda you know the kind
> you bake with not washing soda.
>



I know. I was talking a bout washing soda, and wondering why it has
disappeared from the markets.

-Bob
post #6 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

zxcvbob wrote on 25 Sep 2005 in rec.food.cooking

> I know. I was talking a bout washing soda, and wondering why it has
> disappeared from the markets.
>
> -Bob
>


AFAIK washing soda is just larger flakes of baking soda.

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
post #7 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
> zxcvbob wrote on 25 Sep 2005 in rec.food.cooking
>
>
>>I know. I was talking a bout washing soda, and wondering why it has
>>disappeared from the markets.
>>
>>-Bob
>>

>
>
> AFAIK washing soda is just larger flakes of baking soda.
>


Nope, it's a different chemical. Washing soda (a.k.a. "soda ash") is
sodium carbonate. Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate.

Bob
post #8 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

zxcvbob wrote:

> ~patches~ wrote:
>
>> zxcvbob wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> I use lye to dissolve burnt food in stainless steel pans. I'd use
>>> washing soda, but it seems to have totally disappeared from the stores.
>>>

>>
>> Bob, talking about plain old fashioned baking soda you know the kind
>> you bake with not washing soda.
>>

>
>
> I know. I was talking a bout washing soda, and wondering why it has
> disappeared from the markets.
>
> -Bob

It hasn't. Check under the name of Mule Team 20 or something like that.
I forget. Anyway it will do a nice job. It comes in a box that is
sort of pale green with mules on it.
post #9 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

In article <dh6n4h$8tl$1@blue.rahul.net>, axlq@spamcop.net (axlq)
wrote:

> I wanted to share this.
>
> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>
> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
> one I tried worked beautifully.
>
> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>
> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>
> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
> disappeared.
>
> I didn't know it could be so easy.
>
> -A


Wow.
Thanks!

I always just soaked in vinegar and that did not always work.
A little bleach sometimes works as well, but this sounds easier, and
less caustic. :-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
post #10 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware


>
> > ~patches~ wrote:


> It hasn't. Check under the name of Mule Team 20 or something like that.
> I forget. Anyway it will do a nice job. It comes in a box that is
> sort of pale green with mules on it.



Borax 20 Mule Team washing soda. Box description is correct and of
course found in the laundry aisle.
post #11 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

In article <1127682977.804426.281680@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
"Sheldon" <PENMART01@aol.com> wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > In article <dh6n4h$8tl$1@blue.rahul.net>, axlq@spamcop.net (axlq)
> > wrote:
> >
> > > I wanted to share this.
> > >
> > > My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
> > > The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
> > > remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
> > > a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
> > > chunks, I was ready to give up.
> > >
> > > So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
> > > one I tried worked beautifully.
> > >
> > > I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
> > > with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
> > > parts water to 1 part detergent.
> > >
> > > Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
> > >
> > > Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
> > > disappeared.
> > >
> > > I didn't know it could be so easy.
> > >
> > > -A

> >
> > Wow.
> > Thanks!
> >
> > I always just soaked in vinegar and that did not always work.
> > A little bleach sometimes works as well, but this sounds easier, and
> > less caustic. :-)

>
> Ammonia.
>
> Sheldon
>


I'll try that next time.
Fortunatley, I rarely burn stuff.

Cheers!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-*****." -Jack Nicholson
post #12 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

bobbi_hatch1@yahoo.com wrote:

<snip>

> > Shouldn't that be _20 Mule Team Boraxo_? They used to sponsor a

> televison show years ago.


If memory serves, the host toward the end was Ronald Reagan.
post #13 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

~patches~ <noones_home@thisaddress.com> wrote in
news:11jdshkl14kcb7@corp.supernews.com:

> zxcvbob wrote:
>
>> ~patches~ wrote:
>>
>>> axlq wrote:
>>>
>>>> I wanted to share this.
>>>>
>>>> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
>>>> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
>>>> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
>>>> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
>>>> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>>>>
>>>> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
>>>> one I tried worked beautifully.
>>>>
>>>> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
>>>> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
>>>> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>>>>
>>>> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>>>>
>>>> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
>>>> disappeared.
>>>>
>>>> I didn't know it could be so easy.
>>>>
>>>> -A
>>>
>>>
>>> Hmph! I just use a heavy sprinkling of baking soda with a little
>>> water and let sit. Bring to a boil and everything comes off. It's a
>>> lot cheaper and does a better job.

>>
>>
>>
>> I use lye to dissolve burnt food in stainless steel pans. I'd use
>> washing soda, but it seems to have totally disappeared from the stores.
>>
>> -BB

> Bob, talking about plain old fashioned baking soda you know the kind
> you bake with not washing soda.
>
>


Baking soda is one of my best friends in the kitchen. It totally works on
just about anything and it will also soak up grease. Good stuff.

Michael

--
Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
post #14 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

"axlq" <axlq@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:dh6n4h$8tl$1@blue.rahul.net...
> I wanted to share this.
>
> My expensive copper-bottom stainless stell cookpot got burnt.
> The black carbon deposits stuck to the bottom were impossible to
> remove by scouring. After 15 minutes of exhausting scrubbing with
> a scotchbrite pad, aided by a dull knife to scrape off the bigger
> chunks, I was ready to give up.
>
> So I searched the web and found a whole bunch of suggestions. The
> one I tried worked beautifully.
>
> I put dishwasher detergent into the pot (liquid Cascade in my case)
> with some water, filling it to about 1/2 inch. I'd say there were 2
> parts water to 1 part detergent.
>
> Then I put it on the stove and let it simmer for 20 minutes.
>
> Amazing. The carbon deposits slowly dissolved, and completely
> disappeared.
>
> I didn't know it could be so easy.


I've cooked off cooked and burned on stuff from pans more or less like that
for some time, but using vinegar, bicarb, dish soap, salt - whatever I had
to hand and thought would help - not lost a pan yet! Think it was my nan I
first saw do that when I was about 6 y/o, bless the now deceased wise-arsed
old gal!

',;~}~


Shaun aRe
post #15 of 15

Re: How I removed burnt carbon from cookware

"zxcvbob" <zxcvbob@charter.net> wrote in message
news:3pocknFbao5qU1@individual.net...
> Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
> > zxcvbob wrote on 25 Sep 2005 in rec.food.cooking
> >
> >
> >>I know. I was talking a bout washing soda, and wondering why it has
> >>disappeared from the markets.
> >>
> >>-Bob
> >>

> >
> >
> > AFAIK washing soda is just larger flakes of baking soda.
> >

>
> Nope, it's a different chemical. Washing soda (a.k.a. "soda ash") is
> sodium carbonate. Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate.
>
> Bob


Yup, just the one carbonate in washing soda (they make it from baking soda
but sell what's left over of that there carbonate to sparkling drinks
companies yaknow).





Shaun aRe
--
Living Life Large Like Loud Lemon Lipped Laughter.
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