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Upgrading Sidepull Brakes - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dieseldan
When I got into road riding after MTB, I found the stopping distance to be scary. Most of the problem could be in your head. Since you're going faster, your stopping distance is greater.
Yeah I think there's an element of that too, but I'm pretty sure things could be better.
post #17 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

OK new one for you all. The new brakes I bought have a recessed fixing bolt and the hole in my frame is not big enough for this. Is drilling out the hole a good idea? It doesn't have too far to go but I'm not really liking the sound of it too much.

Whady'a think?

Here's a picture by the way, sorry about the quality but its the e-bay picture rather than one of my own!
LL
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Answering my own posts.....you can tell its a slow day at work. I've found this article just in case anyone is still reading and may find it of interest

http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_r.html#recessed

its about how to fit recessed bolt callipers to old frames (if you hadn't guessed)
post #19 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
Answering my own posts.....you can tell its a slow day at work. I've found this article just in case anyone is still reading and may find it of interest

http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_r.html#recessed

its about how to fit recessed bolt callipers to old frames (if you hadn't guessed)
Yes, it can be done. But why would you want to? Your old 600 calipers will work just fine with new pads, and new cables and housings - all without the risk of buggering your frame.

BTW, the fact that your 600 calipers are nutted (v. recessed) almost certainly means they are of "pre-SLR" vintage.
post #20 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
OK new one for you all. The new brakes I bought have a recessed fixing bolt and the hole in my frame is not big enough for this. Is drilling out the hole a good idea? It doesn't have too far to go but I'm not really liking the sound of it too much.

Whady'a think?

Here's a picture by the way, sorry about the quality but its the e-bay picture rather than one of my own!
From the "fade" paint job and the graphics, I would guess your Raleigh is late '80s -early 90s. Does it have eyelets on the forkends and/or dropouts? How long are the chainstays?

I do wonder where that Stronglight crank came from....
post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Re the drilling out I was going to try one of the less destructive methods since I'm in agreement about the risks of buggering up the frame.

I don't think that there were any eyelets at the front, I haven't really looked at the back and as for the stays I'll get my tape out at the weekend!
post #22 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
Re the drilling out I was going to try one of the less destructive methods since I'm in agreement about the risks of buggering up the frame.

I don't think that there were any eyelets at the front, I haven't really looked at the back and as for the stays I'll get my tape out at the weekend!
Replace cables and pads, and see how the original brakes work with these. Don't start drilling the frame unless you are still not satisfied.
post #23 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
I've just bought a new (secondhand) Road bike and I am loving it. However with my new found speed and the side pull brakes I'm finding that stopping leaves a little to be desired. Is it worth getting dual pivot brakes? Should I just get new brake blocks (the current ones are hardly worn, but they may be a bit old)?
my 2 cents. dual pivot brakes are awesome. i'd say get dual pivot for your front brakes; the difference is noticeable and appreciable. as for your rear, single pivot is fine, since rear brakes are more for modulation than for stopping. the newest campy brakesets have dual in the front and single in the back.

sd
post #24 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldseed
my 2 cents. dual pivot brakes are awesome. i'd say get dual pivot for your front brakes; the difference is noticeable and appreciable. as for your rear, single pivot is fine, since rear brakes are more for modulation than for stopping. the newest campy brakesets have dual in the front and single in the back.

sd
Yeah, "Differential Brakes". LOL! Makes me wonder if Campy hired away some of the Shimano marketing team.

FWIW, last time I looked, a dealer could order Record or Chorus brakesets as all dual-pivot, all single-pivot, or mixed. It is nice to know that those who appreciate the superior modulation of single pivot brakes can still get them for both wheels, if they want to.
post #25 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

OK I now have the dual pivots (Campag mirage. Sorry single pivot guys) on the bike. I didn't do any drilling but followed Sheldon Browns work around of putting the front one at the back (longer bolt all the way through the tube) and the back one at the front (shorter bolt through front wall of tube only and fixing bolt inside the tube)

My verdict is that I prefer the dual pivots for braking stopping me sharp when I needed it with little effort at the lever. I liked the single pivots for looks but I'm not that vain!

Next I went out in the rain and realised that I might as well have not had any brakes.....I guess that one is down to pads since they were at least as good as the V brakes on my mountain bike in the dry.

Next up identification team:

Yes there are eyelets on the fork end and also the stays and the rear stays are 17 1/2" from the centre of the BB to the outside edge of the dropout.

The plot thickens or maybe doesn't I don't know.
post #26 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
Thanks for the advice,sounds like I may have over eagerly splashed out on the new brakes!

I forgot to look at the number on the back, so no further identifiaction there then. I did notice with the 600s that if I increased the clearance from the rim that although I have to move the lever more overall I get more mechanical advantage when the force really needs applying. So I think that I'll continue to have a play around and sell on whichever brakes don't make the rub.

I think that the frame is a Raleigh roadrace (definitely Raleigh but not sure about the roadrace bit ...slightly incomplete ebay history!) I didn't find it in the dumpster I'm afraid but Boudreaux was making the point that since I didn't say what the bike was that putting it in the dumpster might be the cheapest upgrade option!
The presence of eyelets on the fork ends and rear dropouts, combined with the longish chainstays indicate that this is a "sport touring" or even a full touring bike and not a racing bike. My guess, from the little info at hand, is that it's a sport tourer- i.e., a bike with a bit more relaxed geometry than a racing bike (more stable, less twitchy) and with the added utility of being able to accept fenders and a rear rack. IOW, a nice bike for all around riding, even centuries, but not so good for crit racing.
post #27 of 28

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by bajs-eye
OK I now have the dual pivots (Campag mirage. Sorry single pivot guys) on the bike. I didn't do any drilling but followed Sheldon Browns work around of putting the front one at the back (longer bolt all the way through the tube) and the back one at the front (shorter bolt through front wall of tube only and fixing bolt inside the tube)

My verdict is that I prefer the dual pivots for braking stopping me sharp when I needed it with little effort at the lever. I liked the single pivots for looks but I'm not that vain!

Next I went out in the rain and realised that I might as well have not had any brakes.....I guess that one is down to pads since they were at least as good as the V brakes on my mountain bike in the dry.

Next up identification team:

Yes there are eyelets on the fork end and also the stays and the rear stays are 17 1/2" from the centre of the BB to the outside edge of the dropout.

The plot thickens or maybe doesn't I don't know.
I'm curious about this combination. The Mirage brakes don't have a quick release, because they are designed to be used with the campy Ergo shifters that have the quick release for tire changing as part of the brake/shift handles. Are you running small enough tires that it is not an issue?

Otherwise... with no quick release on either end... how are you getting the wheels on and off?
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 

Re: Upgrading Sidepull Brakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by strummer_fan
I'm curious about this combination. The Mirage brakes don't have a quick release, because they are designed to be used with the campy Ergo shifters that have the quick release for tire changing as part of the brake/shift handles. Are you running small enough tires that it is not an issue?

Otherwise... with no quick release on either end... how are you getting the wheels on and off?
Good question and one which I didn't really think about before buying the brakes! Fortunately for me its those skinny tyres that let me get away with it, so no problems even when the pads are really close to the rims (which mine aren't because I prefer the feel of them when they are a bit further away)

I'll try and sort out some further conundrums by my totally random component choices for the future!
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