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Low Carb for the Lazy Man

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
etc.
post #2 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

"overhung" <kyhangdog@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1149172935.972534.214390@y43g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
> etc.
>



Why do you need advice? What you'd fix at home you simply order when you're
out. But since you're admittedly lazy, I wouldn't hold out much hope that
you're going to stick with a low-carb diet. The see-food diet is the diet
of choice for lazy people. Besides, eating home leaves you with some
excellent choices you probably won't get when you're out. Drinks are a fine
example. You won't be offered a glass of Crystal Light or sugar-free
Koolaid.
post #3 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

Besides, eating home leaves you with some
> excellent choices you probably won't get when you're out. Drinks are a
> fine
> example. You won't be offered a glass of Crystal Light or sugar-free
> Koolaid.
>
>


hmm. i don't know if you are kidding or not.
post #4 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

In article <1149172935.972534.214390@y43g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
"overhung" <kyhangdog@gmail.com> wrote:

> Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
> etc.
>


Tough question. Eating LC (whether Atkins or whatever) is NOT for the
lazy. It is hard work everyday, and there is no going back to "normal
eating" as so many people like to call it (a misnomer, I believe).

--
***************************
Wayne Crannell
Atkins+ 10/21/01
249/141
***************************
post #5 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

"nanner" <nospam@nospam.nospam> wrote in message
news:09Dfg.16$xb6.0@fe08.lga...
> Besides, eating home leaves you with some
> > excellent choices you probably won't get when you're out. Drinks are a
> > fine
> > example. You won't be offered a glass of Crystal Light or sugar-free
> > Koolaid.
> >
> >

>
> hmm. i don't know if you are kidding or not.
>
>



What makes yout think I'm kidding? Have you ever been served Crystal Light
in a restaurant? Around here we just don't get that on a menu.
post #6 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

Wayne Crannell wrote:

> Tough question. Eating LC (whether Atkins or whatever) is NOT for the
> lazy. It is hard work everyday, and there is no going back to "normal
> eating" as so many people like to call it (a misnomer, I believe).


That is definitely true - trying to substantially (and permanently!)
change my eating habits has been one of the hardest things i've ever
done!
post #7 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

overhung wrote:
> Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
> etc.


I know how tough it can be. I like to cook but am frequently so tired
when I get home from work that I just don't feel like doing it.

A few ideas:

1) Buy bagged salad, frozen vegetables, and already-cut-up vegetable
trays. Deli meat is in a ready-to-eat form, as are some of the
precooked meats at the grocery store. Cheese is that way too, just cut
it up. Eggs aren't hard to cook, put them in the water before you get
into the shower in the AM and they'll generally be done by the time you
get out.

2) Find a few things that work for your diet that you can tolerate
cooking, then on a weekend cook a LOT of them and freeze or fridge it
for the coming week, separated into individual portions.
We do this a lot - grill a pile of meat on Sunday and eat it for the
rest of the week, topped with different stuff and with steamed frozen
vegs on the side.

3) Eating out can be hard but most places have salads on the menu. Or
get a burger and don't eat the bun, and ask for them to swap in a
vegetable or salad for the fries. Most places have some sort of
workable option on the menu.

LQ
post #8 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

Luna wrote:

:: I guess my eating can get kind of monotonous without all the fancy
:: recipes, but I don't really care. It's enough variety for health,
:: and the tradeoff is that I don't have to be thinking about food and
:: cooking all the time.

I think you eat a lot like I do....I keep things simple....
post #9 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

Roger Zoul wrote:
>
> I think you eat a lot like I do....I keep things simple....


Same here - meat & vegetable, meat & salad, eggs & vegetable, fish &
vegetable, fish & salad, chicken & salad, chicken & vegetable etc etc.

Its a bit boring but it means I don't have to think much about what
each meal is going to be. And the way the year has been going so far,
that's a good thing...

On weekends I may try something more interesting, but during the week
the menu looks like that.

LQ
post #10 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

GreenRaven@att.net wrote:
:: Roger Zoul wrote:
:::
::: I think you eat a lot like I do....I keep things simple....
::
:: Same here - meat & vegetable, meat & salad, eggs & vegetable, fish &
:: vegetable, fish & salad, chicken & salad, chicken & vegetable etc
:: etc.
::
:: Its a bit boring but it means I don't have to think much about what
:: each meal is going to be. And the way the year has been going so far,
:: that's a good thing...
::
:: On weekends I may try something more interesting, but during the week
:: the menu looks like that.
::
:: LQ

See, that's it. Bore yourself through the week and have something a little
different on weekends. Then, that will seem quite special by comparison (at
least for me it does).
post #11 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

overhung wrote:
>
> Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
> etc.


I find myself scanning menus out of habit. As a result I skipped
over the plentifull and easy low carb items on most menus and
I had to search again.

So take it as a challenge - Read the whole menu trying to ditch
your old habits. Then learn the patterns. Then build new habits
of skimming menus for stuff. Then you'll discover it's easy.

It's all a matter of training the mind and the eyes for what to see
and what to ignore.
post #12 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

In article <1149180252.157103.180070@j55g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
(GreenRaven@att.net) says...
> 2) Find a few things that work for your diet that you can tolerate
> cooking, then on a weekend cook a LOT of them and freeze or fridge it
> for the coming week, separated into individual portions.
> We do this a lot - grill a pile of meat on Sunday and eat it for the
> rest of the week, topped with different stuff and with steamed frozen
> vegs on the side.


ITA! My favorite time-saver is my Tilia FoodSaver with it's jar
attachment. I cut up a bunch of jicama and celery and add maybe some
olives and green onions (but I've stopped with the green onions for now)
and use it as either a salad base or a stir-fry base. I usualy make a
week's worth at a time, separate them into mason jars and then suck the
air out with the FoodSaver. It keeps AMAZINGLY well and all I have to
do is dump it into a bowl or frying pan and add cheese, dressing/sauce,
meat or whatever I feel like adding at the time of cooking. That way I
get my veggies but I don't have to make a big production out of it each
time, and the base provides plenty of food for a meal in and of itself.

--
Saffire
205/140/135-140 (aka JUST RIGHT!)
Atkins since 6/14/03
Progress photo: http://photos.yahoo.com/saffire333

*** This post originated in alt.support.diet.low-carb -- its appearance
in any other forum is deceptive and unauthorized. ***
post #13 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

<inthepinks@gmail.com> wrote

> you need to try to get rid of your laziness.


I beg to differ. Laziness is an important source of all human invention.

--
Bob
http://www.kanyak.com
post #14 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

In article <ZIOfg.106125$dW3.45120@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>,
"Tracey" <pepita@redherring.com> wrote:

> "overhung" <kyhangdog@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1149172935.972534.214390@y43g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> > Any advice on sticking with low carb, when I hate to cook? Eating out,
> > etc.

>
>
> Actually, for me, Low carb is easy for the I hate to cook crowd (me).
> Simple: Tossing a steak on the grill or a chicken breast in the broiler is
> totally mindless. Open a bag of salad and you've got a meal. Other ideas:
> can of tuna and bag of salad. Stir fry or steam some pre-cut veggies from
> the salad bar at the grocery store. Raw veggies and ranch dressing, cook a
> burger on the grill (no bun, of course). All I eat is simple things like
> this.
>
>


This is interesting, and it all relates to a fundamental mind shift from
food as an event to food as fuel, even though the process of weight loss
and maintenance becomes an event unto itself.

Before my "weight adjustment," food was a grand affair, and I have to
admit that I do miss this aspect. I was an amateur gourmet chef, with an
emphasis on Cajun, Creole, and Thai foods, and the process of food was
an entertainment - possibly THIS was part of the 100 pound problem I was
carrying with me. I remember 20 years ago as a grad student watching the
"Great Chefs" series in the late evenings and planning meals for the
next day. Every day would be a food event with the art of cooking being
the point but the consumption of thousands of calories worth of sauces,
jasmine rice, and homemade pastas being the result. While I applaud
those who continue to attempt gourmet creations with an LC focus, it
isn't quite the same, and I wonder if the search for substitutes by so
many is part of the reason for so much eventual failure? Maybe the point
is that continued long-term success means that one cannot eat chocolate
chip cookies AT ALL rather than trying to find an LC substitute. THAT is
the true lifestyle change.

Most of my culinary creativity these days comes from the use of spices
in an almost alchemist approach to combinations of flavors. I'm afraid
the days of gumbo and etouffee are sadly gone....not necessarily because
they are not possible under LC, but because I still remember the real
thing, and it's not the same.

<soapbox>
Finally, the truth is that NO taste/food/texture and the resulting
emotional salve is worth going back. Of course one piece of birthday
cake or a cookie won't hurt, but obviously to be 100 pounds overweight
means there is no such thing as ONE anything, and when the potential
LCer admits this basic fact, s/he will have long term success.
</soapbox>

--
***************************
Wayne Crannell
Atkins+ 10/21/01
249/141
***************************
post #15 of 18

Re: Low Carb for the Lazy Man

I agree and consider myself a fairly lazy cook, though my love of tasty
things inspires me to go beyond the steak and salad routine. One lazy trick
I like is big pots of stuff that can be eaten for more than one meal. I
especially like hearty soups in the cool weather. If you don't like to eat
the same thing several days running you can freeze meal size portions to
spread them out. When you divide the work of preparing a big pot of
something by the number of meals it provides it isn't that much work. I
hate to keep reposting some of my favorites but will if people want them,
they can google my posts for soup to find them as well.


In news:12804mfdu25ue1a@news.supernews.com,
Opinicus <gezgin@spamcop.net> stated
| <inthepinks@gmail.com> wrote
|
|| you need to try to get rid of your laziness.
|
| I beg to differ. Laziness is an important source of all human
| invention.
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