or Connect
Cycling Forums › Forums › Bikes › Cycling Equipment › What makes a good climbing bicycle?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What makes a good climbing bicycle?

post #1 of 49
Thread Starter 
What makes a good climbing bicycle? Please give examples! Super thanks!
post #2 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

the climber on it. example Rasmussen.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
What makes a good climbing bicycle? Please give examples! Super thanks!
post #3 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by FREDBLACK
the climber on it. example Rasmussen.
+1 on the climber. It's all in the motor. Most of the weight issues that surround a climbing bike really don't apply to the real world. I guess wight savings may factor into the top pros, but most even mid lvel pros consider themselves lucky to have one road bike and one TT bike. Personally, I like to climb on all AL frames bacause I prefer the stiffness.
post #4 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

I agree with the responses so far. The engine. Work on the engine. But that wasn't the question. What are the qualities of a good climbing bike?

Considering that while climbing your cadence drops, your torque must increase for a give power output. So I'd say the lateral stiffness of the frame, wheels, cranks and handlebars are all semi-important. I calculated it out a few times and the losses in those parts aren't big. Maybe a Watt or two at most.

Weight is also important. Though it's easy to get carried away and miss the big picture. If you and your bike and all your gear come in at 180 pounds, 1 pound isn't a lot. In fact, if you neglect wind resistance and rolling resistance one pound is only ~0.5% difference in power output at the same speed. Again a Watt or two depending on your output.

I'd say the most important part is getting a comfortable, efficient position on the bike. Relaxing and opening up the upper body to allow your chest and lungs to expand to their full capacity. Learning your optimal cadence and rhythm. Knowing when to stand and when to climb seated. These can all affect your performance in a huge way.

John Swanson
www.bikephysics.com
post #5 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
What makes a good climbing bicycle? Please give examples! Super thanks!
Climbing bikes should have light and stiff frames, you should be able to sit in an upright position comfortably, and the wheels should be light with less focus on aerodynamics and more focus on reduced rotational mass. Fortunately, road bikes aren't that specialized (as opposed to skiing where a GS ski would have much different properties than a slalom ski). Assuming no changes are going to be made to the engine, I would always opt for the lightest frame and wheels possible.. Consider a triple or compact chainset as well, if the intended use is long steep climbs. Examples? If I was building a bike solely for climbing (and money was no object) it would be something like this:
Frame: Litespeed Ghisallo
Components: Campy Record with carbon compact crankset.
Wheels: Zipp 202 or Campy Hyperion Ultra's
Bear in mind, don't sacrifice too much downhill stability. Most long tough climbs are followed with screaming descents. If you're shimmying at 45 mph, you won't care how many grams you just saved on that whippy fork...
post #6 of 49
Thread Starter 

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterF
Climbing bikes should have light and stiff frames, you should be able to sit in an upright position comfortably, and the wheels should be light with less focus on aerodynamics and more focus on reduced rotational mass. Fortunately, road bikes aren't that specialized (as opposed to skiing where a GS ski would have much different properties than a slalom ski). Assuming no changes are going to be made to the engine, I would always opt for the lightest frame and wheels possible.. Consider a triple or compact chainset as well, if the intended use is long steep climbs. Examples? If I was building a bike solely for climbing (and money was no object) it would be something like this:
Frame: Litespeed Ghisallo
Components: Campy Record with carbon compact crankset.
Wheels: Zipp 202 or Campy Hyperion Ultra's
Bear in mind, don't sacrifice too much downhill stability. Most long tough climbs are followed with screaming descents. If you're shimmying at 45 mph, you won't care how many grams you just saved on that whippy fork...
So...is the trek madone ssl better than the cervelo soloist carbon or R3?
post #7 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
What makes a good climbing bicycle? Please give examples! Super thanks!
Go to: analyticcycling.com. You can enter any hypotheticals and their computer program will answer all your questions.
post #8 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
So...is the trek madone ssl better than the cervelo soloist carbon or R3?
Yes. I mean definitely not. Well, sometimes, but then again ... It would depend on what you mean by "better". As you make your question more specific, it will tend to answer itself. Good luck in sorting it out.
post #9 of 49
Thread Starter 

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
So...is the trek madone ssl better than the cervelo soloist carbon or R3?
Is the Trek Madone SSL better than the Cervelo Soloist Carbon in durability and assisting in climb. I was curious because I think I remember Trek wanting to call their crown jewel bicycle "The Climbing Bicycle," but Disco decided against it. The Soloist Carbon's down tube is thin, so I was woundering if that gives the proper amount of energy transfer and durability.
post #10 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nas_kaj
Is the Trek Madone SSL better than the Cervelo Soloist Carbon in durability and assisting in climb. I was curious because I think I remember Trek wanting to call their crown jewel bicycle "The Climbing Bicycle," but Disco decided against it. The Soloist Carbon's down tube is thin, so I was woundering if that gives the proper amount of energy transfer and durability.
Almost all of the pro climbing bike framesets, YOU can buy. All of the pro framesets, I know about, have a threaded boss under the bottom bracket to add a lead weight to, to bring the bike up to the UCI minimum of just under 15lbs. Why? For the same reason a sailboat has it's lead keel centered and as low as possible. Buy/ride what the pros do and worry about geometry and if it's too quick for you. There is no answer to your question's, unless you provide an infinite number of parameters you want the bike to perform to, and your ability.
post #11 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

The best climbing bike is the one that you think is the best. Everyone has an opinion on what is more important. There are always balances. Is it better to be lighter and not as stiff or stiff and not as light. Loosing the rotational mass in the wheels is great for going up but you loose stability when going down the other side. The way to have the best climbing bike is to have the best climbing engine. Overall lighter is better if you can maintain the stiffness.
post #12 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by unicos
The best climbing bike is the one that you think is the best. Everyone has an opinion on what is more important. There are always balances. Is it better to be lighter and not as stiff or stiff and not as light. Loosing the rotational mass in the wheels is great for going up but you loose stability when going down the other side. The way to have the best climbing bike is to have the best climbing engine. Overall lighter is better if you can maintain the stiffness.
The best climbing bike, is any one the pros ride. It's at the UCI minimum weight, it's stiff enough not to sacrafice energy transfer, and it's stable enough to descend at 55mph+. Most of these are availible to the public.
post #13 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Rotational mass has no effect at all on climbing. 100 grams of the rims is no different to 100grams off your **** or seatpost or bars etc.


Quote:
Originally Posted by unicos
The best climbing bike is the one that you think is the best. Everyone has an opinion on what is more important. There are always balances. Is it better to be lighter and not as stiff or stiff and not as light. Loosing the rotational mass in the wheels is great for going up but you loose stability when going down the other side. The way to have the best climbing bike is to have the best climbing engine. Overall lighter is better if you can maintain the stiffness.
post #14 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 11ring
Rotational mass has no effect at all on climbing. 100 grams of the rims is no different to 100grams off your **** or seatpost or bars etc.
You mean, at a constant speed and not when sprinting or trying a breakaway?
post #15 of 49

Re: What makes a good climbing bicycle?

Yes. But accelerating like this is not specific to climbing, so to say a bike with good acceleration is a good climbing bike doesn't really make sense.

Rotating weight does affect acceleration.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lks
You mean, at a constant speed and not when sprinting or trying a breakaway?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling Equipment
Cycling Forums › Forums › Bikes › Cycling Equipment › What makes a good climbing bicycle?