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Food management

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Hi everbody

I'm planning my next tour and it looks like I'll be cyling in Northern Europe as of June.

Anyway, I've made several tours before but have never taken a stove with me. This time I'm not quite sure if I should invest in the MSR Whisperlite.

I wonder how other long distance cyclists handle their food management. Do you take a stove or do you eat out? Do you prefer warm meals or just live on sandwiches and bananas?
post #2 of 3

Re: Food management

Quote:
Originally Posted by camino10
Hi everybody

I'm planning my next tour and it looks like I'll be cycling in Northern Europe as of June.

Anyway, I've made several tours before but have never taken a stove with me. This time I'm not quite sure if I should invest in the MSR Whisperlite.

I wonder how other long distance cyclists handle their food management. Do you take a stove or do you eat out? Do you prefer warm meals or just live on sandwiches and bananas?
I used to use the Whisperlite International but now use the dragonfly as it will simmer a lot better and gives good cooking control. Running it on unleaded petrol it cost about 15c a day for fuel.

Porridge is a good way to start the day or get to the bakery in town and indulge. We were in France in June 2005 and the day's were 38-40degrees C so we were on the road by 6 am and would finish the ride at 12. Then either stop in a restaurant before setting up camp or clean up first depending on how close the camp ground was to the town. Eat a nice lunch (plat du jour) washed down with some chilled rose. wander and explore then buy some things for dinner and go back and cook a nice meal and have some more rose.
Front panniers were used for food and cooking gear.
We ate very well.

Cheers

Geoff
post #3 of 3

Re: Food management

I like to be able to cook when I want or make tea or coffee so I carry a Trangia.
The fuel is alcohol which while being slower than some cookers is simple and clean, you also get pots and wind shield as part of the kit.
I eat out when I feel like it and cook at other times.
Being able to cook also gives you more options for camp sites and routes.
A hot meal seems to replenish the mind and body better than cold especially on a cold night.
Cheers
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