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Oregano: ground vs leaves

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Scott <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

>I'm making lasagna this weekend and want to know what's the conversion
>rate between ground oregano and oregano leaves. I've search on google
>and all I can find is fresh vs. dried oregano leaves. Every recipe I
>seen calls for leaves. Ground oregano is all I have on hand know. Or
>will it be worth it to just buy oregano leaves?


As a wild-ass guess, a teaspoon of leaves would be about 1/4 teaspoon
of ground.

But if your ground oregano is more than a few months old, and you
have a Mexican grocer nearby, a 99-cent package of Mexican oregano
leaves is your best bet.

Steve
post #2 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Scott wrote:
> I'm making lasagna this weekend and want to know what's the conversion
> rate between ground oregano and oregano leaves. I've search on google
> and all I can find is fresh vs. dried oregano leaves. Every recipe I
> seen calls for leaves. Ground oregano is all I have on hand know. Or
> will it be worth it to just buy oregano leaves?


I've never even heard of ground oregano? LOL
I have fresh growing, and dried in the freezer. When using fresh I use
more than dried. That's all I can tell you. I imagine ground would be
easy to go too heavy on, so perhaps you should add it cautiously and
increase to taste?
post #3 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Scott wrote:
> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that call for no
> sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of sugar so now I'm confused
> on how much sugar I should use.


None. It is lasagna you're making, not dessert.
Goomba (who can't imagine why someone would want to add sugar to lasagna..?)
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Scott <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Goomba38 wrote:


>> Goomba (who can't imagine why someone would want to add sugar to
>> lasagna..?)


>That's also what I thought, but every jar of spaghetti sauce I've seen
>uses sugar. Maybe that's why when I use spaghetti sauce in my lasagna it
>just didn't seem right.


Adding unnecessary sugar and unnecessary salt makes food products
sell better. Unfortunately it doesn't make them taste better.
This is a bit of a paradox but it seems to be true.

Steve
post #5 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

In article <V9CdnSWkC-YB0_XbnZ2dnUVZ_r-onZ2d@giganews.com>,
Scott <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Goomba38 wrote:
> > Scott wrote:
> >> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that call for no
> >> sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of sugar so now I'm confused
> >> on how much sugar I should use.

> >
> > None. It is lasagna you're making, not dessert.
> > Goomba (who can't imagine why someone would want to add sugar to
> > lasagna..?)

>
> That's also what I thought, but every jar of spaghetti sauce I've seen
> uses sugar. Maybe that's why when I use spaghetti sauce in my lasagna it
> just didn't seem right.


Some people add sugar to their tomato sauce to be used with pasta. I'd
rather not, myself, although I'll eat it. Spaghetti sauce in the jar
isn't much different than tomato sauce from a can with added sugar and
salt, except it's more expensive.
post #6 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Scott wrote:
> Peter wrote:
>> "Scott" <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:YJOdnR0ZjbNd1PXbnZ2dnUVZ_h2pnZ2d@giganews.com...
>>> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that call for
>>> no sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of sugar so now I'm
>>> confused on how much sugar I should use.

>>
>> Sugar is lasagna? Is this a joke?
>>

>
> Nope, I've seen numerous recipes that call for sugar.


Don't do everything people tell you to do. I recently saw a recipe from
a very eager amateur whose recipes in the main are good. It had 4
ingredients, every one of them a fake food. The last ingredient was
Cool Whip. His last word was "Enjoy!" I just said no.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
post #7 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

George wrote

>> Adding unnecessary sugar and unnecessary salt makes food products
>> sell better. Unfortunately it doesn't make them taste better.
>> This is a bit of a paradox but it seems to be true.
>> Steve


> For sure, but someone must like the industrial taste because it is
> getting more difficult to find tomato sauces or dishes made with
> tomatoes that aren't loaded with sugar and salt.


And what can the reason be? They pick theyr tomatoes underripe to cut
times on soil and have longer produce life, then add sugar based to
make up for un-ripeness. Thay probably should be using some
anti-acidic to reduce the acidity of un-ripe tomatoes.
Here in Italy it's getting the same, many brands already sell
sugar-added tomato sauce, while the ingredients' list used to read
just "Pomodori, sale" (Tomatoes, salt).
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rose'
post #8 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

"Scott" <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:WuadnYG5DI7uwvXbnZ2dnUVZ_hqdnZ2d@giganews.com...
> Scott wrote:
>> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that
>> call for no sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of
>> sugar so now I'm confused on how much sugar I should use.

>
> After doing some intense searching on google I found this:
>
> Adding sugar or salt - both of which have a natural affinity
> with tomatoes
> - should be a personal preference and not to counteract and
> mask a problem.
> A little sugar, just to enhance the tomato's natural sweetness
> yet not enough
> to be noticed at first taste is all that is needed.
> The amount will vary from batch to batch.
>


This is the most sensible post I've seen in this thread on the
subject of sugar in Italian sauces. The first time I ever ate a
homecooked meal with an Italian family, I was surprised that the
lady of the house added about a tablespoon of sugar to her
spaghetti sauce for 8 people. It *was* good and I've always
added a little despite the pundits who profess themselves
horrified.

I grow oregano and it is less pungent than the dried. I would
use half a cup of fresh chopped oregano or a tablespoon of
dried.
--
Jim Silverton
Potomac, Maryland
post #9 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

In article <V9CdnSWkC-YB0_XbnZ2dnUVZ_r-onZ2d@giganews.com>,
Scott <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

> That's also what I thought, but every jar of spaghetti sauce I've seen
> uses sugar. Maybe that's why when I use spaghetti sauce in my lasagna it
> just didn't seem right.


Making a marinara sauce for spaghetti is dirt easy. Then you can add
salt or sugar to taste. I have used a half tsp of sugar occasionally to
cut down on the tang of canned diced tomatoes. I think homemade is way
better than store bought and much cheaper too.
On the other hand, what I make may not be spaghetti sauce, but I use it
anyway.

leo

--
<http://web0.greatbasin.net/~leo/>
post #10 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Goomba38 wrote:
> Scott wrote:
>
>> I'm making lasagna this weekend and want to know what's the conversion
>> rate between ground oregano and oregano leaves. I've search on google
>> and all I can find is fresh vs. dried oregano leaves. Every recipe I
>> seen calls for leaves. Ground oregano is all I have on hand know. Or
>> will it be worth it to just buy oregano leaves?

>
>
> I've never even heard of ground oregano? LOL
> I have fresh growing, and dried in the freezer. When using fresh I use
> more than dried. That's all I can tell you. I imagine ground would be
> easy to go too heavy on, so perhaps you should add it cautiously and
> increase to taste?


Dried oregano leaves usually concentrate the flavor of the herb. Good
rule of thumb is twice as many teaspoons, or other unit of measure, of
fresh leaves compared to dried. I dehydrate my own oregano for
wintertime use and usually just crush it in my hand before adding to
whatever I'm cooking. Same with thyme and basil.

George
post #11 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

On Jun 7, 5:36 pm, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
wrote:
>The first time I ever ate a
> homecooked meal with an Italian family, I was surprised that the
> lady of the house added about a tablespoon of sugar to her
> spaghetti sauce for 8 people. It *was* good and I've always
> added a little despite the pundits who profess themselves
> horrified.
> Jim Silverton
> - Show quoted text -


My grandmother (b.1893) of German descent 'always' added sugar to
tomatoes (garden tomatoes). To me, a pinch of sugar added to any kind
of canned tomatoes is de rigeur.
Dee Dee
post #12 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

On Jun 7, 6:49 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:

>
> Dried oregano leaves usually concentrate the flavor of the herb. Good
> rule of thumb is twice as many teaspoons, or other unit of measure, of
> fresh leaves compared to dried. I dehydrate my own oregano for
> wintertime use and usually just crush it in my hand before adding to
> whatever I'm cooking. Same with thyme and basil.
>
> George


I thought it was 1 to 3 - dried to fresh.
Dee Dee
post #13 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

In article <YJOdnR0ZjbNd1PXbnZ2dnUVZ_h2pnZ2d@giganews.com>,
Scott <sws2000@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that call for no
> sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of sugar so now I'm confused
> on how much sugar I should use.


Do whatever results in the flavor you like best. There's no wrong or
right answer. Trial and error is how most cooks get their best results.
post #14 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Dee Dee wrote:

> On Jun 7, 6:49 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Dried oregano leaves usually concentrate the flavor of the herb. Good
>>rule of thumb is twice as many teaspoons, or other unit of measure, of
>>fresh leaves compared to dried. I dehydrate my own oregano for
>>wintertime use and usually just crush it in my hand before adding to
>>whatever I'm cooking. Same with thyme and basil.
>>
>>George

>
>
> I thought it was 1 to 3 - dried to fresh.
> Dee Dee
>

Depends on the herb and how it was processed. I use a dehydrator but
sometimes just put the leaves out on the cabinet on a towel to air dry.
The latter usually has a stronger flavor. We use a lot of herbs just for
gifts to family and friends during the holiday season so I generally
dehydrate them.

George
post #15 of 15

Re: Oregano: ground vs leaves

Scott wrote:
> Another related question is I've seen lasagna recipes that call for no
> sugar and others that call for up to 2tbs of sugar so now I'm confused
> on how much sugar I should use.


NO sugar in lasagna!!

None.

Nope.

Serene
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