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Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is a
work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.

I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
on the road with a nice old road bike.
post #2 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

Tim McNamara wrote:
> In article <46c7a440$0$23600$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>,
> marcus9000@gmail.com wrote:
>
>> tom.doud@gmail.com wrote:
>>> I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
>>> cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
>>> original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
>>> model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is a
>>> work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.
>>>
>>> I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
>>> mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
>>> So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
>>> on the road with a nice old road bike.
>>>

>> It was the Schwinn next in line below the Paramounts.
>> I don't follow vintage Schwinns, but value wise assuming it is in good
>> condition I would guess at $300 to $500, being complete with original
>> components I would think it would be of interest to collectors of things
>> Schwinn and might well be worth more.

>
> I think you're seriously overestimating the value, but I could be quite
> wrong about that. If it brought $150 I'd be surprised, but then the
> "vintage" bike market is a weird beast that doesn't follow logical
> rules.


The market for anything that is "collectible" does not follow logical rules.

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
post #3 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

<tom.doud@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1187485114.996690.280860@a39g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
> I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
> cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
> original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
> model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is a
> work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.
>
> I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
> mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
> So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
> on the road with a nice old road bike.
>


http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/bik/400030094.html $125


--
Chas. verktygjunk@aol.spamski.com (Drop spamski to E-mail me)
post #4 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

Andrew Muzi mused:
> ...
> (a human body is, what 87c worth of chemicals?


Reminds me of Carl Sagan mixing all the ingredients to make a person in
a vat. I was highly disappointed when no human climbed out.

A more accurate measure of worth might be to see what the local
rendering plant is paying per unit weight.

> As a slave, a human's worth $50 or $100 in Sudan, Tom Sherman can be all yours for $50K/year.
> Prices vary)


Hey, I am slightly more expensive than that!

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
post #5 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

"Tom "Johnny Sunset" Sherman" <sunsetss0003@innvalid.com> wrote in message
news:46c8b463$0$25578$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
> Andrew Muzi mused:
> > ...
> > (a human body is, what 87c worth of chemicals?

>
> Reminds me of Carl Sagan mixing all the ingredients to make a person in
> a vat. I was highly disappointed when no human climbed out.
>
> A more accurate measure of worth might be to see what the local
> rendering plant is paying per unit weight.
>


Off to the abattoir with you.

We need to be cautious however to prevent the spread of mad cowboy
disease.

Chas.
post #6 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

<marcus9000@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:46c9b5e8$0$23559$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com...
> Donald Gillies wrote:
> > tom.doud@gmail.com writes:
> >
> >> I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
> >> cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
> >> original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
> >> model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is

a
> >> work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.

> >
> >> I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
> >> mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
> >> So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
> >> on the road with a nice old road bike.

> >
> >
> > Parts worth $150 - $200
> > Frame worth $0.
> > Any carbon-steel frame from europe ("Raleigh Record") is lighter than

yours.
> >
> > - Don Gillies
> > San Diego, CA

>
> I think you are mixing this up with Schwinn flash welded, seamed tubing
> frames, Continental, Varsity et al.
>
> While Schwinn fillet brazed lightweights were not particularly light in
> comparison to some bike frames, they are IMO not tanks, ride nicely,
> handle well and are far better quality than the example Raleigh Record.
>
> The Superior was hand built from seamless straight gauge chrome-moly
> tube (4130) and fillet brazed not welded.
> I think it represents one of the high points in production American
> frames and a construction technique we will probably never see again.
>
> For more info see: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/schwinn-braze.html
>
>
> Marcus
>


Yes but..... They still used heavier wall thickness tubing than comparable
mid range European bikes of that era.

How much did Schwinn Superiors weigh? European bikes with 3 main tubes
made of straight gage or butted alloy steel tubes and equipped with alloy
components weighed in at 24-26 Lbs. with clinchers - ~ 2Lbs. less with
sewups.

I'm not sure what the marketoid term "flash welding" means. Were Pipa de
Schwinn bikes arc, TIG or MIG welded? To me flash welding would seem to
mean spot welded which is a process usually used for welding sheet metal.

I remember seeing several Varsity style Schwinns with fillet brazing that
failed at the head tube. They were fillet brazed not welded. Customers
brought them into our shop with the fork, bars and head tube in one hand
and the rest of the bike in the other. The brazing material remained on
the top and down tubes but there was a very poor bond to the head tube.

The seamed pipe that the lower priced Schwinns were made of had a wall
thickness of 2.5mm to 3mm. These bikes weighed in at 38-40 Lbs. Similar
quality lugged European bikes weighed in around 28-32 Lbs.

Most of the Japanese bikes from the early 1970s were made from the same
kind of pipe as the low end Schwinns and weighed up to 36 Lbs. with steel
components. The importers started having some of these bikes made from
heavy wall 4130 alloy steel tubing - total marketing BS. They were still
heavy clunkers that rode and handled like a wheel barrow.

One reason for using thick wall tubing is to overcome the low strength and
fatigue resistance of cheap carbon steel. Alloy steels like Reynolds,
Columbus and the different brands made from 4130 steel are 2 to 3 times
stronger and have much higher fatigue resistance that plain carbon steel
pipe.

The cost difference between 1018 carbon steel and 4130 alloy steel tubing
in 1976 was less than $5.00 USD for a set of frame tubes. This was the
cost to a manufacture not the price custom builders paid for tube sets
from Reynolds, Columbus etc.

Chas.
post #7 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

On Aug 18, 5:58 pm, tom.d...@gmail.com wrote:
> I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
> cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
> original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
> model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is a
> work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.
>
> I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
> mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
> So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
> on the road with a nice old road bike.


On the Schwinn web site is a collectors forum. You could try asking
your question there. There are some very knowledgeable people on that
forum.

Good luck,
Tom
post #8 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

On Aug 20, 11:33 am, marcus9...@gmail.com wrote:
> Donald Gillies wrote:
> > tom.d...@gmail.com writes:

>
> >> I just dusted off my old 1976 Schwinn Superior. It looked so good, I
> >> cleaned it off and had my LBS give it a once over. It has all the
> >> original parts, even the tubes/tires. This is the fillet brazed
> >> model, hand-made in Chicago, according to a site I saw. The frame is a
> >> work of art, narrow metal frame with smooth joints.

>
> >> I'm just wondering what kind of value this bike has. I mostly
> >> mountain bike, but I thought of using this for some cross training.
> >> So, it there a market out there? If not, I'll just enjoy a few miles
> >> on the road with a nice old road bike.

>
> > Parts worth $150 - $200
> > Frame worth $0.
> > Any carbon-steel frame from europe ("Raleigh Record") is lighter than yours.

>
> > - Don Gillies
> > San Diego, CA

>
> I think you are mixing this up with Schwinn flash welded, seamed tubing
> frames, Continental, Varsity et al.
>
> While Schwinn fillet brazed lightweights were not particularly light in
> comparison to some bike frames, they are IMO not tanks, ride nicely,
> handle well and are far better quality than the example Raleigh Record.
>
> The Superior was hand built from seamless straight gauge chrome-moly
> tube (4130) and fillet brazed not welded.
> I think it represents one of the high points in production American
> frames and a construction technique we will probably never see again.


Unless you buy a LandShark.

/s


>
> For more info see:http://www.sheldonbrown.com/schwinn-braze.html
>
> Marcus- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -
post #9 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

A Muzi wrote:

> Construction technique is alive and well.
> This fillet brazed steel frame was built August 2007:
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/JACKHOLN.JPG


OMG, Andrew posted a pic without a hot babe in it!

Bill "let it not be a trend, friend" S.
post #10 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

A Muzi wrote:
>> A Muzi wrote:
>>> Construction technique is alive and well.
>>> This fillet brazed steel frame was built August 2007:
>>> http://www.yellowjersey.org/JACKHOLN.JPG

>
> Bill Sornson wrote:
>> OMG, Andrew posted a pic without a hot babe in it!
>> Bill "let it not be a trend, friend" S.


> Yes, I have a propensity to ask any woman standing around, "Hey hold
> this bike a second! [snap camera]". One of my better bad habits.


Don't ever change! (However, I preferred thinking that they rode and/or
owned the bikes pictured; made 'em -- the women, that is -- that much more
attractive.)

> heck I just shoot snapshots:
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/WFDJHZ.JPG
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/CANDYMUM.JPG
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/ITALGIRL.JPG
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/PEUGIRL.JPG
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/ORDNARI.JPG
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...st/FIXMIMI.JPG


All very cool.

> if you have time to kill, our photo library is once more perusable:
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/


Consider it clicked.
post #11 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

A Muzi wrote:

> if you have time to kill, our photo library is once more perusable:
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/


Oh-oh. Expect to be picketed by (The Most Reverend) Al Sharpton!

http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...%231pmp_ho.jpg

Bill "what's in a /name/?" S.
post #12 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

A Muzi wrote:
>> A Muzi wrote:
>>> if you have time to kill, our photo library is once more perusable:
>>> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/

>
> Bill Sornson wrote:
>> Oh-oh. Expect to be picketed by (The Most Reverend) Al Sharpton!
>> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...%231pmp_ho.jpg
>> Bill "what's in a /name/?" S.

>
> I uploaded that for someone here on r.b.t. by request. Didn't even
> notice the name in the halcyon pre-Imus days.


We won't mention your "upskirt" file, either.

Bill "research purposes only" S.
post #13 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

"Scott Gordo" <blubberpuss@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1187639289.809663.126510@k79g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
> On Aug 20, 11:33 am, marcus9...@gmail.com wrote:
>> Donald Gillies wrote:
>>
>> While Schwinn fillet brazed lightweights were not particularly light in
>> comparison to some bike frames, they are IMO not tanks, ride nicely,
>> handle well and are far better quality than the example Raleigh Record.
>>
>> The Superior was hand built from seamless straight gauge chrome-moly
>> tube (4130) and fillet brazed not welded.
>> I think it represents one of the high points in production American
>> frames and a construction technique we will probably never see again.

>
> Unless you buy a LandShark.
>


Doesn't Curtlo still fillet? Or does he weld and file?

http://www.curtlo.com/photo-gallery.html

Greg
--
Ticketmaster and Ticketweb suck, but everyone knows that:
http://ticketmastersucks.org
"Ya gotta stop riding the brakes,
ya gotta stop robbing the cradle" - Chris D
post #14 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

On Mon, 20 Aug 2007 19:42:54 -0500, A Muzi <am@yellowjersey.org> wrote:

>>>> A Muzi wrote:
>>>>> if you have time to kill, our photo library is once more perusable:
>>>>> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/

>
>>> Bill Sornson wrote:
>>>> Oh-oh. Expect to be picketed by (The Most Reverend) Al Sharpton!
>>>> http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...%231pmp_ho.jpg
>>>> Bill "what's in a /name/?" S.

>
>> A Muzi wrote:
>>> I uploaded that for someone here on r.b.t. by request. Didn't even
>>> notice the name in the halcyon pre-Imus days.

>
>Bill Sornson wrote:
>> We won't mention your "upskirt" file, either.
>> Bill "research purposes only" S.

>
>We have many interests, what can I say?


http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/WFD&ZEF1.JPG

Ouch.

Ron
post #15 of 34

Re: Schwinn Superior 1976 marketable?

On Aug 20, 11:48 am, Scott Gordo <blubberp...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > The Superior was hand built from seamless straight gauge chrome-moly
> > tube (4130) and fillet brazed not welded.
> > I think it represents one of the high points in production American
> > frames and a construction technique we will probably never see again.

>
> Unless you buy a LandShark.
>
> /s


A couple FWIWs: I owned a Schwinn Superior of that era (1978-80-ish:
my high school years) and I remember as a decent bike for the era.
*Definitely* heavy... the seattube was a non-standard 1 3/16"
diameter. However, since I'm a big kid (6-foot-4 before I graduated),
the extra stiffness of the large tubes made is a stable long-distance
bike.

It required a particular Huret front derailleur to fit, and I remember
that the rear derailleur hanger was peculiar, also. The headset was
Schwinn standard, so the only quality "replacement" nowadays would be
from the BMX market. The seatpost was also oversize, so you're not
going to find an easy replacement for it, either.

I do miss it. It had a bombproof quality that I've found in few other
bikes.

Nowadays, I *do* own a fillet-brazed LandShark. It's a track frame
that I'm turning into a roadworthy fixie.

Jeff
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