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Maintenance Manuals

post #1 of 239
Thread Starter 
Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
does for auto repair.

I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol
post #2 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

sutherland's

http://www.amazon.com/Sutherlands-Ha...1039436&sr=8-2


On Sep 29, 12:05 am, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> does for auto repair.
>
> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol
post #3 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

In article <1191039479.922619.176200@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups.com>,
BigJulie <julianshapiro@gmail.com> wrote:

> sutherland's
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Sutherlands-Ha...herland/dp/091
> 4578065/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4791940-4852967?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191039436&sr=8-2
>
>
> On Sep 29, 12:05 am, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> > is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> > don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> > that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> > pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> > does for auto repair.
> >
> > I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
> > keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
> > into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
> > the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol


At a much lower price, Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance
(and the similar Road Bike Maintenance) are good Chilton-level books.
I'd just get the one for your primary kind of ride, as much of the
material overlaps, and the differences aren't liable to catch you out
unless you're a roadie and you decide to start doing your own fork
maintenance on your MTB.

Sheldonbrown.com seems like it has directions on virtually every
mechanical repair known to cycling, so it's almost as good as having
your own bike manual.

I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book on bicycle wheels, called
"The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the theory of wheels and the
proper procedure for wheelbuilding.

--
Ryan Cousineau rcousine@sfu.ca http://www.wiredcola.com/
"I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
post #4 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 28, 10:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> does for auto repair.
>
> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol


Sutrherlands, Zinn books and the Park book are all great for your
reference library. Add Schraener's and Brandt's books on
wheelbuilding.
post #5 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 28, 11:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> does for auto repair.
>

If you need immediate help, the Park Tool site is really a superb
resource.

http://parktool.com/repair/
post #6 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

landotter wrote:
> On Sep 28, 11:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
>> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
>> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
>> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
>> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
>> does for auto repair.
>>

> If you need immediate help, the Park Tool site is really a superb
> resource.
>
> http://parktool.com/repair/
>


also available as ' the big blue book of bicycle repair'

--
/Marten

info(apestaartje)m-gineering(punt)nl
post #7 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

Mark wrote:

>
> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol
>


the usual suspects:
bicycles & tricycles / sharp/ mit press
bicycling science/wilson /mit/ press
touring bikes Tony oliver out of print
bicycle design, mike burrows
Shimano 2010 catalogue aka The Data book


--
/Marten

info(apestaartje)m-gineering(punt)nl
post #8 of 239
Thread Starter 

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 29, 8:54 am, landotter <landot...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sep 28, 11:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> > is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> > don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> > that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> > pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> > does for auto repair.

>
> If you need immediate help, the Park Tool site is really a superb
> resource.
>
> http://parktool.com/repair/


No not immediate help. When I was a kid a bike lasting very long
wasn't happening. Part of it was because we were on them constantly
and part because about all we ever did to keep them going was keep the
chain oiled, (with extra motor oil or the old 3 in one oil) brakes and
fix flats and tires. Yeah I tinker with many things. But the more I
tinker, the more I learned that there usually is a reason they do
things like they do.

Sometimes its for the Sears reason. I ended up with a Sears lawn
tractor that I had to work on yesterday. When they put the cover on
what I was working on they didn't use a phillips or slotted screw.
They didn't use something the common allen wrench would take off
either. Instead they used a star bit knowing full well most people
that might try to work on it wouldn't have one. I did. ha ha. Yet
the average homeowner would get frustrated trying to get that simple
thing out and you guessed it call Sears to get them to do the repair
for them.

My recent bike purchase would likely be called entry level and in the
scheme of things would be considered relatively inexpensive. Though
its not the $100 Walmart special, its not the $1000 bike either.
Still it cost as much as my first car and this time I want to learn
how to keep it riding well. Maybe I will have more fun on my bike
than I had in my first car. On second thought I doubt it.

Mark
post #9 of 239
Thread Starter 

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 29, 8:54 am, landotter <landot...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sep 28, 11:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> > is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> > don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> > that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> > pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> > does for auto repair.

>
> If you need immediate help, the Park Tool site is really a superb
> resource.
>
> http://parktool.com/repair/


No not immediate help. When I was a kid a bike lasting very long
wasn't happening. Part of it was because we were on them constantly
and part because about all we ever did to keep them going was keep the
chain oiled, (with extra motor oil or the old 3 in one oil) brakes and
fix flats and tires. Yeah I tinker with many things. But the more I
tinker, the more I learned that there usually is a reason they do
things like they do.

Sometimes its for the Sears reason. I ended up with a Sears lawn
tractor that I had to work on yesterday. When they put the cover on
what I was working on they didn't use a phillips or slotted screw.
They didn't use something the common allen wrench would take off
either. Instead they used a star bit knowing full well most people
that might try to work on it wouldn't have one. I did. ha ha. Yet
the average homeowner would get frustrated trying to get that simple
thing out and you guessed it call Sears to get them to do the repair
for them.

My recent bike purchase would likely be called entry level and in the
scheme of things would be considered relatively inexpensive. Though
its not the $100 Walmart special, its not the $1000 bike either.
Still it cost as much as my first car and this time I want to learn
how to keep it riding well. Maybe I will have more fun on my bike
than I had in my first car. On second thought I doubt it.

Mark
post #10 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 28, 11:05 pm, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
> does for auto repair.
>
> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol


I've also found the Zinn books and the wheel book by Gerd Schraner to
be good sources. I don't have Jobst's book yet but probably will
someday.

Smokey
post #11 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

"jim beam" <spamvortex@bad.example.net> wrote in message
news:mZSdnW2KsY96yWPbnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@speakeasy.net...
> Ryan Cousineau wrote:
>> In article <1191039479.922619.176200@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups.com>,
>> BigJulie <julianshapiro@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> sutherland's
>>>
>>> http://www.amazon.com/Sutherlands-Ha...herland/dp/091
>>> 4578065/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4791940-4852967?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191039436&sr=8-2
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sep 29, 12:05 am, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
>>>> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
>>>> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
>>>> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
>>>> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
>>>> does for auto repair.
>>>>
>>>> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
>>>> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
>>>> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
>>>> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol

>>
>> At a much lower price, Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance (and
>> the similar Road Bike Maintenance) are good Chilton-level books. I'd just
>> get the one for your primary kind of ride, as much of the material
>> overlaps, and the differences aren't liable to catch you out unless
>> you're a roadie and you decide to start doing your own fork maintenance
>> on your MTB.
>>
>> Sheldonbrown.com seems like it has directions on virtually every
>> mechanical repair known to cycling, so it's almost as good as having your
>> own bike manual.
>>
>> I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
>> here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book

>
> /a/ book.
>
>> on bicycle wheels, called "The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the
>> theory of wheels and the proper procedure for wheelbuilding.
>>

>
> procedure, yes. theory? some of it is badly awry. spoke tension "as
> high as the rim can bear" for example is based on a fundamental
> misunderstanding by the author and that is of the most practical [and
> costly] consequence to the novice builder - excess tension can cause a
> higher propensity for rim buckling and directly cause rim cracking. the
> book should should be amended to specify spoke tension "as determined by
> the rim manufacturer".


I guess that we all saw that coming...sad
post #12 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

Frank Drackman wrote:
> "jim beam" <spamvortex@bad.example.net> wrote in message
> news:mZSdnW2KsY96yWPbnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@speakeasy.net...
>> Ryan Cousineau wrote:
>>> In article <1191039479.922619.176200@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups.com>,
>>> BigJulie <julianshapiro@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> sutherland's
>>>>
>>>> http://www.amazon.com/Sutherlands-Ha...herland/dp/091
>>>> 4578065/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4791940-4852967?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191039436&sr=8-2
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Sep 29, 12:05 am, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>>> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
>>>>> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
>>>>> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
>>>>> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
>>>>> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
>>>>> does for auto repair.
>>>>>
>>>>> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
>>>>> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
>>>>> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
>>>>> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol
>>> At a much lower price, Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance (and
>>> the similar Road Bike Maintenance) are good Chilton-level books. I'd just
>>> get the one for your primary kind of ride, as much of the material
>>> overlaps, and the differences aren't liable to catch you out unless
>>> you're a roadie and you decide to start doing your own fork maintenance
>>> on your MTB.
>>>
>>> Sheldonbrown.com seems like it has directions on virtually every
>>> mechanical repair known to cycling, so it's almost as good as having your
>>> own bike manual.
>>>
>>> I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
>>> here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book

>> /a/ book.
>>
>>> on bicycle wheels, called "The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the
>>> theory of wheels and the proper procedure for wheelbuilding.
>>>

>> procedure, yes. theory? some of it is badly awry. spoke tension "as
>> high as the rim can bear" for example is based on a fundamental
>> misunderstanding by the author and that is of the most practical [and
>> costly] consequence to the novice builder - excess tension can cause a
>> higher propensity for rim buckling and directly cause rim cracking. the
>> book should should be amended to specify spoke tension "as determined by
>> the rim manufacturer".

>
> I guess that we all saw that coming...sad
>
>


And completely wrong, it's not what the book says at all.
post #13 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sat, 29 Sep 2007 16:38:15 -0400, Peter Cole
<peter_cole@comcast.net> wrote:

>Frank Drackman wrote:
>> "jim beam" <spamvortex@bad.example.net> wrote in message
>> news:mZSdnW2KsY96yWPbnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@speakeasy.net...
>>> Ryan Cousineau wrote:
>>>> In article <1191039479.922619.176200@y42g2000hsy.googlegroups.com>,
>>>> BigJulie <julianshapiro@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> sutherland's
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.amazon.com/Sutherlands-Ha...herland/dp/091
>>>>> 4578065/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4791940-4852967?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191039436&sr=8-2
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Sep 29, 12:05 am, Mark <mblackwell1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>>>>> Well as I am increasingly intrigued by the mechanics of bikes. There
>>>>>> is a lot I just have never taken apart, put back together, and frankly
>>>>>> don't fully understand how things work. I wondered if there is a book
>>>>>> that is accepted as "the book to have on bike maintenance" that shows
>>>>>> pictures and step by step instructions much the way the Chiltons book
>>>>>> does for auto repair.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'd also be interested in books on bike design. Now I would like to
>>>>>> keep the theory to a practical level. No I have no idea to turn this
>>>>>> into an engineering project. I am already married to an engineer and
>>>>>> the last thing one needs is two engineers in the same house. lol
>>>> At a much lower price, Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance (and
>>>> the similar Road Bike Maintenance) are good Chilton-level books. I'd just
>>>> get the one for your primary kind of ride, as much of the material
>>>> overlaps, and the differences aren't liable to catch you out unless
>>>> you're a roadie and you decide to start doing your own fork maintenance
>>>> on your MTB.
>>>>
>>>> Sheldonbrown.com seems like it has directions on virtually every
>>>> mechanical repair known to cycling, so it's almost as good as having your
>>>> own bike manual.
>>>>
>>>> I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
>>>> here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book
>>> /a/ book.
>>>
>>>> on bicycle wheels, called "The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the
>>>> theory of wheels and the proper procedure for wheelbuilding.
>>>>
>>> procedure, yes. theory? some of it is badly awry. spoke tension "as
>>> high as the rim can bear" for example is based on a fundamental
>>> misunderstanding by the author and that is of the most practical [and
>>> costly] consequence to the novice builder - excess tension can cause a
>>> higher propensity for rim buckling and directly cause rim cracking. the
>>> book should should be amended to specify spoke tension "as determined by
>>> the rim manufacturer".

>>
>> I guess that we all saw that coming...sad
>>

>
>And completely wrong, it's not what the book says at all.


Dear Peter,

Here's what the 3rd edition says:

FINDING THE RIGHT TENSION

The following method works well in determining proper spoke tension
for conventional road rims of up to 43 0 grams with 36 spokes. Tighten
all the spokes a quarter turn at a time, starting at the valve stem
hole. Once a distinct tone can be made by plucking, and spokes are not
easily squeezed together by grasping them in pairs, it is time to
check tension. After each round of tightening, test the tension by
stress relieving. If the wheel becomes untrue in two large waves
during stress relieving, the maximum, safe tension has been exceeded.
Approach this tension carefully to avoid major rim distortions. When
the wheel loses alignment from stress relieving, loosen all spokes a
half turn before retruing the wheel

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
post #14 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

In article <1LadnYtQHvW8CmPbnZ2dnUVZ_sCtnZ2d@comcast.com>,
"Frank Drackman" <frankdrack@yahoo.com> wrote:

> "jim beam" <spamvortex@bad.example.net> wrote in message
> news:mZSdnW2KsY96yWPbnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@speakeasy.net...
> > Ryan Cousineau wrote:


> >> I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
> >> here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book

> >
> > /a/ book.
> >
> >> on bicycle wheels, called "The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the
> >> theory of wheels and the proper procedure for wheelbuilding.
> >>

> >
> > procedure, yes. theory? some of it is badly awry...

>
> I guess that we all saw that coming...sad


Actually, thanks to killfiles, I didn't see it at all.

--
Ryan Cousineau rcousine@sfu.ca http://www.wiredcola.com/
"I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
post #15 of 239

Re: Maintenance Manuals

On Sep 29, 10:44 pm, Ryan Cousineau <rcous...@sfu.ca> wrote:
> In article <1LadnYtQHvW8CmPbnZ2dnUVZ_sCtn...@comcast.com>,
> "Frank Drackman" <frankdr...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > "jim beam" <spamvor...@bad.example.net> wrote in message
> >news:mZSdnW2KsY96yWPbnZ2dnUVZ_gOdnZ2d@speakeasy.net...
> > > Ryan Cousineau wrote:
> > >> I make no submission on most bike design books, but regular contributor
> > >> here Jobst Brandt literally wrote the book

>
> > > /a/ book.

>
> > >> on bicycle wheels, called "The Bicycle Wheel," and it covers both the
> > >> theory of wheels and the proper procedure for wheelbuilding.

>
> > > procedure, yes. theory? some of it is badly awry...

>
> > I guess that we all saw that coming...sad

>
> Actually, thanks to killfiles, I didn't see it at all.
>
> --
> Ryan Cousineau rcous...@sfu.cahttp://www.wiredcola.com/
> "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
> to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos


Which killfile do you use> And is it applicable to Google groups?

Been here before...some authors beg for killfile.
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