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Soldering Cable ends

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems to
> bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing
> seems to work.
>
> Jeff


There are some extremely-caustic acid fluxes that will do the job; the stuff
I used to use back in the day had all manner of nasty warning labels and
contained chemicals probably best not breathed. Crimp-style cable ends are
probably a better way to go.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
post #2 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

On 2007-10-29, Jeff <none@nothingX.com> wrote:
>
> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of solder
> and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems to bead up
> and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing seems to
> work.


Use a blob of glue or a crimp instead. I soldered a cheap generic cable
once easily, but then I tried it on a fancy Teflon one and as you say
nothing would stick (although I wasn't as determined as you).
post #3 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff
....could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
derailleur cable ends?
I believe some (der) cables are actually stainless, which would explain their reluctance to take on solder(applied by soldering iron) rather well.
I've repeatedly promised myself that "the next time" I need to replace cables I'm going to bring out the brazing gear if they won't take solder.
For brazing I got stuff that's compatible with stainless, but I don't know if the higher temperature will cause more trouble than the properly sealed cable end solves....
post #4 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Why do you want do that? I always put a kind of "hat" in lead at the
end of these cable gripped with a plier. These hats are here (in France
sold by every lbs)

c

Jeff wrote:
>
> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but
> nothing seems to work.
>
> Jeff
>
>
post #5 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Quote:
Originally Posted by c
Why do you want do that?
It makes it possible to pull the cable out of its sheath, wipe it down, regrease lightly and reinstall w/o the end fraying or getting caught somewhere in the sheath. Besides, it's not that unusual that the crimped ends come off.
post #6 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Jeff wrote:
>
> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but
> nothing seems to work.
>
> Jeff
>
>


I heat the end & rub it with a stick of hot melt glue.
post #7 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

"Jeff" <none@nothingX.com> wrote in message
news:47255e53$0$26403$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
>
> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems to
> bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing
> seems to work.
>
> Jeff



I gave up trying in this modern era of teflon coated or stainless steel
inners. Now I use a 15mm length of 3mm plastic heatshrink tubing. A lifetime
supply readily available in red blue white black and yellow from an
electronics shop and shrunk with a Bic gas lighter flame. Looks neat, keeps
cable end under control and easily peeled off if necessary with a sharp
hobby knife.

Peter.
post #8 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends


>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
>> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
>> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing
>> seems to work.

>



Silver Solder...and an iron hot enough.
-tom
post #9 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 08:35:42 -0700, Tom Nakashima wrote:

>>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
>>> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
>>> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing
>>> seems to work.

>>

>
>
> Silver Solder...and an iron hot enough.
> -tom


Irons are unlikely to get hot enough for silver solder.

Silver-bearing soft solder they would do - but the original poster's
complaint would probably still hold; the addition of a small amount
(typically ~5%) of silver to soft solder does little or nothing for wetting
the surface; for that he need a flux suitable for the metal(s) to be
joined.
post #10 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

"Peter Howard" <bbrover109@bbbigpond.net.au> wrote in message
news:LPjVi.6544$CN4.3096@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>
> "Jeff" <none@nothingX.com> wrote in message
> news:47255e53$0$26403$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
>>
>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
>> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
>> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but nothing
>> seems to work.
>>
>> Jeff

>
>
> I gave up trying in this modern era of teflon coated or stainless steel
> inners. Now I use a 15mm length of 3mm plastic heatshrink tubing. A
> lifetime supply readily available in red blue white black and yellow from
> an electronics shop and shrunk with a Bic gas lighter flame. Looks neat,
> keeps cable end under control and easily peeled off if necessary with a
> sharp hobby knife.
>



Peter,
Brilliant, thanks for the idea. Used to solder old cables OK, resorted to
crimp-ons for modern cables, but didn't like the frayed ends when removing
'em to regrease.
Kerry
post #11 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

"Jeff" <none@nothingX.com> wrote in message
news:4725d5c7$0$26479$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
>
> "Peter Howard" <bbrover109@bbbigpond.net.au> wrote in message
> news:LPjVi.6544$CN4.3096@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>>

>
>> I gave up trying in this modern era of teflon coated or stainless steel
>> inners. Now I use a 15mm length of 3mm plastic heatshrink tubing. A
>> lifetime supply readily available in red blue white black and yellow from
>> an electronics shop and shrunk with a Bic gas lighter flame. Looks neat,
>> keeps cable end under control and easily peeled off if necessary with a
>> sharp hobby knife.
>>
>> Peter.

>
> Yes, I like it. I have a ton of this stuff and just tried it. ...but you
> sure you're using 3mm? I have 1/16th that shrinks to 1/32 (about half your
> diameter) and it fits nicely. ...much cleaner than solder or end caps and
> can be removed if necessary. ...might even have to go out and get some
> colored stuff as mine is all black.
>
> Thanks
>
> Jeff
>
>

Oops! Glad you picked that up before I misled anyone else. I just went and
looked and the stuff I have is indeed 1.5mm. I used black on my latest
cabling job with a black teflon coated wire. I mentioned the colours because
a splash of colour could make a nice accent.
I must have been thinking of the length of 3mm I bought within the last week
for a LED bike light project.
I hate those little alloy top hat caps. Crimp them too tight and the end of
cable gets distorted and frays the instant you remove the cap again. Crimp
them too loose and the cap is self-removing.

Peter
post #12 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Dear Jeff,
the trick is buy new teflon coated cables, maybe new housing, clean
wax with Finish Line teflon wax - let one coat dry on cable - fill
housing with FL, notice how the nipple's design to do this - and let
sit filled in sun.
BUY CABLE CRIMP ENDS
install/reinstall and crimp cable end on cable.
soldering cable end is impossible - heat inceases the multistrand
wicking action to waaaayyyy
beyond a flux capacity to reduce the flowing goop.
post #13 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

"Kerry Montgomery" <kamontgo@teleport.com> wrote in message
news:13ic48em3gr80af@corp.supernews.com...
>
> "Peter Howard" <bbrover109@bbbigpond.net.au> wrote in message
> news:LPjVi.6544$CN4.3096@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
>>
>> "Jeff" <none@nothingX.com> wrote in message
>> news:47255e53$0$26403$88260bb3@free.teranews.com...
>>>
>>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
>>> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just seems
>>> to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it, but
>>> nothing seems to work.
>>>
>>> Jeff

>>
>>
>> I gave up trying in this modern era of teflon coated or stainless steel
>> inners. Now I use a 15mm length of 3mm plastic heatshrink tubing. A
>> lifetime supply readily available in red blue white black and yellow from
>> an electronics shop and shrunk with a Bic gas lighter flame. Looks neat,
>> keeps cable end under control and easily peeled off if necessary with a
>> sharp hobby knife.
>>

>
>
> Peter,
> Brilliant, thanks for the idea. Used to solder old cables OK, resorted to
> crimp-ons for modern cables, but didn't like the frayed ends when removing
> 'em to regrease.
> Kerry
>
>


:-) and see my reply to Jeff above who picked up that I meant to say 1.5mm
(or 1/16th) heatshrink.
post #14 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

I am sorry, it seems that the lead 'hats' are named ferrule or tip in
English.

c wrote:
> Why do you want do that? I always put a kind of "hat" in lead at the
> end of these cable gripped with a plier. These hats are here (in France
> sold by every lbs)
>
> c
>
> Jeff wrote:
>
>>
>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types of
>> solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder just
>> seems to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable, sanded it,
>> but nothing seems to work.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
>>
post #15 of 30

Re: Soldering Cable ends

Doug Cimper writes:

>> ...could someone tell me what the tricks are to soldering brake and
>> derailleur cable ends? I've now tried with a few different types
>> of solder and flux and different amounts of heat and the solder
>> just seems to bead up and fall off. I've degreased the cable,
>> sanded it, but nothing seems to work.


> I have tried to solder them and got nowhere too. The cables in
> question appeared to be stainless steel, which would explain a lot
> of may failure.


> What I prefer to do is cut them with an emery cut-off wheel in a
> Dremel moto-tool on high speed. The wires are cut so easily that
> they still stay straight and the cut end can still easily be fed
> through a jacket, where a "normal" pair of cable cutters (otherwise
> known as 'the right tool for the job') leaves the end all bent up a
> mess.


A good pair of diagonal cutters will cut good control and brake cables
off without a splayed end because these cables are made of hard
strands that spring back to their original shape after cutting. The
real problem is anchor bolts on derailleurs and brakes that crimp the
wire and cause it to splay. I was always impressed by the brake cable
clamp on Campagnolo Record brakes that clamped the cable with no
damage regardless of how tight it was camped.

Today, with liability claims as they are (with technically impractical
juries) non-crimping clamps are hard to find. Cable crimp sleeves are
not the solution because the cable cannot be pulled out of holes into
which they were threaded.

Stainless wires are easily silver soldered but most of us don't have
the flux or oxy-acetylene torch to do it.

Jobst Brandt
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