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osgood-schlatter adult recurrence?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Anyone out there seeing something that looks like a recurrence of
Osgood-schlatter "disease" from their earlier days?

I suffered pretty badly back when I started riding seriously and just before
I began racing (13-15 years old); went to three different doctors, of which
the first said to stop any sort of strenuous exercise (fat chance of THAT!)
or else I could be crippled for life, the second said that exercise would be
the best thing for it, and the third said they honestly didn't know, but
figured I would be pain-limited from doing any serious damage to myself. The
last guy turned out to be correct, and within 6 months the condition had
largely gone away. Best thing about it was the side-benefit of learning to
set aside pain in your mind.

OK, so no last effects after that first 6 months, aside from a pretty big
bulge below each kneecap. Even that gradually subsided over the years,
particularly in my left knee. My right knee, on the other hand, stayed more
visible and over the last 10 years or so may have actually increased a bit
in size. More recently, there's a bit of tenderness when putting pressure on
it when sitting on the floor.

Anybody else (mid-life age; I'm 52) seeing anything like this? There's no
real pain associated with it, for what it's worth, it just lets me know it's
there once in a while. The only reason I bring it up at all is that I've
noticed I'm standing more now when climbing, which *might* be an adaptation
to it (Osgood-Schlatters tends to be more painful during deeper knee bends).

Thanks-

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
post #2 of 10

Re: osgood-schlatter adult recurrence?

On Jan 28, 10:43 pm, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <mik...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> Anyone out there seeing something that looks like a recurrence of
> Osgood-schlatter "disease" from their earlier days?
>
> I suffered pretty badly back when I started riding seriously and just before
> I began racing (13-15 years old); went to three different doctors, of which
> the first said to stop any sort of strenuous exercise (fat chance of THAT!)
> or else I could be crippled for life, the second said that exercise would be
> the best thing for it, and the third said they honestly didn't know, but
> figured I would be pain-limited from doing any serious damage to myself. The
> last guy turned out to be correct, and within 6 months the condition had
> largely gone away. Best thing about it was the side-benefit of learning to
> set aside pain in your mind.
>
> OK, so no last effects after that first 6 months, aside from a pretty big
> bulge below each kneecap. Even that gradually subsided over the years,
> particularly in my left knee. My right knee, on the other hand, stayed more
> visible and over the last 10 years or so may have actually increased a bit
> in size. More recently, there's a bit of tenderness when putting pressure on
> it when sitting on the floor.
>
> Anybody else (mid-life age; I'm 52) seeing anything like this? There's no
> real pain associated with it, for what it's worth, it just lets me know it's
> there once in a while. The only reason I bring it up at all is that I've
> noticed I'm standing more now when climbing, which *might* be an adaptation
> to it (Osgood-Schlatters tends to be more painful during deeper knee bends).
>
> Thanks-
>
> --Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


No experience with recurrance, but my son, 12, had a painful case last
year. His physio suggested we try IMS (intramuscular stimulation) ,
sorta like accupuncture, in his hip. The idea was to release a spasm
in his sartorious I think. Anyway, worked a charm. Almost instant
relief and no recurrance. Not sure if it applies to adults, but she
said she didn't usually use it on kids, so it must have some
relevance. If you want more details, I can ask her.
post #3 of 10

Re: osgood-schlatter adult recurrence?

OSGOOD-SCHLATTER DISEASE is off topic for this newsgroup. Please include OT
in the subject line so that we know it's off topic so us serious racer types
don't get confused.



"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:NWznj.5855$hI1.5544@nlpi061.nbdc.sbc.com...
> Anyone out there seeing something that looks like a recurrence of
> Osgood-schlatter "disease" from their earlier days?
>
> I suffered pretty badly back when I started riding seriously and just
> before I began racing (13-15 years old); went to three different doctors,
> of which the first said to stop any sort of strenuous exercise (fat chance
> of THAT!) or else I could be crippled for life, the second said that
> exercise would be the best thing for it, and the third said they honestly
> didn't know, but figured I would be pain-limited from doing any serious
> damage to myself. The last guy turned out to be correct, and within 6
> months the condition had largely gone away. Best thing about it was the
> side-benefit of learning to set aside pain in your mind.
>
> OK, so no last effects after that first 6 months, aside from a pretty big
> bulge below each kneecap. Even that gradually subsided over the years,
> particularly in my left knee. My right knee, on the other hand, stayed
> more visible and over the last 10 years or so may have actually increased
> a bit in size. More recently, there's a bit of tenderness when putting
> pressure on it when sitting on the floor.
>
> Anybody else (mid-life age; I'm 52) seeing anything like this? There's no
> real pain associated with it, for what it's worth, it just lets me know
> it's there once in a while. The only reason I bring it up at all is that
> I've noticed I'm standing more now when climbing, which *might* be an
> adaptation to it (Osgood-Schlatters tends to be more painful during deeper
> knee bends).
>
> Thanks-
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
>
>
>
post #4 of 10

Re: osgood-schlatter adult recurrence?

On Jan 29, 1:43 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <mik...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
> Anyone out there seeing something that looks like a recurrence of
> Osgood-schlatter "disease" from their earlier days?
>

I had a fairly severe case when younger, that went undiagnosed until
later in my teens. A few years ago, ( I'm 54 now ) I whacked my knee
against a steel stanchion at work, which remained quite painful and
swollen for over a week. My orthopedist (thankfully a Masters class
regional champ) ended up removing a small calcium nodule from the
tendon. It seems that these nodules often become embedded in the
tendon of O/S patients, acting like small time bombs. When the
nodule irritates the tendon via a small trauma, the tendon becomes
inflamed. The surgery was quite easy, and recovery was about a
week....the surgeon only has to separate the strands of the tendon,
not cut them. Relief was immediate, and the big bumps below the
kneecap have become much smaller....(mine used to protrude beyond my
knee cap).

In short, see a good ortho...preferably one with sports medicine
background

//jtd//
post #5 of 10

Re: osgood-schlatter adult recurrence?

In article <NWznj.5855$hI1.5544@nlpi061.nbdc.sbc.com>,
"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

> Anyone out there seeing something that looks like a recurrence of
> Osgood-schlatter "disease" from their earlier days?
>
> I suffered pretty badly back when I started riding seriously and just before
> I began racing (13-15 years old); went to three different doctors, of which
> the first said to stop any sort of strenuous exercise (fat chance of THAT!)
> or else I could be crippled for life, the second said that exercise would be
> the best thing for it, and the third said they honestly didn't know, but
> figured I would be pain-limited from doing any serious damage to myself. The
> last guy turned out to be correct, and within 6 months the condition had
> largely gone away. Best thing about it was the side-benefit of learning to
> set aside pain in your mind.
>
> OK, so no last effects after that first 6 months, aside from a pretty big
> bulge below each kneecap. Even that gradually subsided over the years,
> particularly in my left knee. My right knee, on the other hand, stayed more
> visible and over the last 10 years or so may have actually increased a bit
> in size. More recently, there's a bit of tenderness when putting pressure on
> it when sitting on the floor.
>
> Anybody else (mid-life age; I'm 52) seeing anything like this? There's no
> real pain associated with it, for what it's worth, it just lets me know it's
> there once in a while. The only reason I bring it up at all is that I've
> noticed I'm standing more now when climbing, which *might* be an adaptation
> to it (Osgood-Schlatters tends to be more painful during deeper knee bends).


I think the first physician was right.

--
Michael Press
post #6 of 10

  Hello,

  

   My name is Joshua and I was notified that I had osgood Schlatters disease i am 15 years old and i love playing basketball but my knee restricts me to do so much in basketball. I feel like i am making it worse when i play basketball and that i should stop. Although it is too hard for me to do so so i cant. After looking this up online i read that this disease wont go away until i m finished growing or even permanently. This really sucks and i feel like me not playing basketball is not benefiting my knee at all since i wont go away for a while. I have pain while i play at times. Is it okay if i play through it i do not know what to do.. HELPP??

post #7 of 10

Hi, Thanks for sharing your experience with your 12 yr old. i have a 12 year old going trough the same. is only been 3 weeks now. we stopped sports for now. with excercises, i am interested to learn about the IMS (acupunture). Thanks. it would really help me to help my son go through this experience.

post #8 of 10

I had OS as a child. The symptoms came on when I was about 12 years old and I had been heavily involved in Swimming sports.

I am now 59 years old and still have recurring symptoms. The symptoms were very sore knees and unable to bear the pain when I knelt on the floor.

Fortunately our family doctor was right on the money with his diagnosis. I was told to immediately cease swimming and to keep my legs straight at all times.

To facilitate this my right leg was put in a plaster cast. After 6 weeks the cast was removed and the symptoms had seemed to have gone.

To this day I still have the very knobby knees that most sufferers seem to describe.

As the years went by, the only symptom I would get was an ache in my left leg (the one not in plaster). No problems with the right leg.

The ache would only come on if I was overly physically tired or exposed to cold temperatures.

Placement of heat on my left leg would relieve the pain in about an hour every time.

Over the last 6 months the pain in my left leg has come more often and lasted longer, needing longer sessions with heat to relieve it.

I don't know if this due to naturally aging, or if there is an underlying leftover from OS that is slowly rearing it's head.

I will be consulting my doctor ASAP as the pain has not gone for about two weeks this time...........

post #9 of 10

OS is painful but rarely does it result in lasting issues. Intervention other than rest, ibuprofen, cold and elevation is rarely necessary. I have never heard of immobilization being required.

 

I am also surprised that swimming would aggravate OS. Swimming is very low stress on the joints / tendons. On the other hand, had a partial tear of my right patellar tendon jumping during a B Ball game - it healed up on its own by doing home rehab and less stressful exercises.

 

Wikipedia has a pretty good summary of the condition: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osgood%E2%80%93Schlatter_disease

post #10 of 10
During the ages of 12-19,your bones are growing at a very rapid rate. However, the length of your muscles can't catch up to that and therefore are producing an increased amount of tension on the tendon - bone interface. This increased tension, along with the demands of Physical activity, can lead to irritation of the tendon - bone interface, or in this case, your tibia and your patellar tendon. One thing you can do is to do stretching exercises to your quadriceps to help increase the length of the muscle as to not create increase tension on the patellar tendon.
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