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Race Report: fattie master self-esteem sandbag crit!

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Due to a confluence of events, it was easy for me to get to tonight's
mid-week training crit, a dead-flat industrial park crit which I favor
because the roads are wide, and did I mention the dead flatness?

Most of the race featured a noteworthy headwind on the start-finish
straight. This was only my second training crit of the year, owing to
rain-outs and scheduling issues.

So, I signed up for the "C" group, a matter of scheduling more than
sandbagging, but I didn't expect to be competitive in "B" quite yet.
Nonetheless, I was curious as to how my fitness would be among the
novices and first-timers.

Dead flat race with lots of wind, so the early action was very limited:
desultory attacks, minimal pace for nearly half the race. I hung near
the front, never dropping further back than about 10th wheel.

I had two capable teammates in the race, and as the prime bell finally
rang, I was still near the front of the race, and halfway around the
short (2km?) lap, I started shouting at my teammates to get in line. At
that point I was about 4th wheel, more or less, with the leaders showing
no interest in attacking.

So I dragged it out, and lead out my teammate for the prime sprint.

You know you're pulling pretty well when you launch your teammate to the
prime and still finish second in the sprint. I'm sure he enjoyed me
yelling "faster!" at him as he crossed the line.

As soon as I crossed the line, I was bagged, and four riders (including
my other teammate) formed up a break. 1:4 struck me as good odds, so I
slipped into the pack to recover, and I came good within a lap.

At that point, I spent the rest of the race near the front of the chase
group with my prime-winning teammate, just watching the leaders gain a
few seconds per lap. They stayed away, with me doing nothing to help the
chasers.

So now it's a sprint for fifth place. Blah blah blah, some guys went
sorta fast, I stayed near the front on their wheels, another guy went
fast, I found a few inches between two guys, I went really fast, and I
walked away with the bunch sprint handily, looking genuinely powerful as
I finished.

My teammate in the break got fourth.

Lessons: sprint is still there. On flat courses, I probably don't
deserve to race with the "C" group now. But hey, I am a fat Cat 4. The
finish sprint looked impressive, but the part I am happiest about was
smoothly leading out my teammate, and recovering from the effort without
blowing up and getting spit out the back. The only thing left to decide
is whether I should sandbag this series until they kick me to "B", or
voluntarily move.

You should come to Vancouver Joseph: the racing would suit you quite
nicely!

--
Ryan Cousineau rcousine@gmail.com http://www.wiredcola.com/
"In other newsgroups, they killfile trolls."
"In rec.bicycles.racing, we coach them."
post #2 of 6

Re: Race Report: fattie master self-esteem sandbag crit!

On May 23, 5:23 am, Ryan Cousineau <rcous...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Due to a confluence of events, it was easy for me to get to tonight's
> mid-week training crit, a dead-flat industrial park crit which I favor
> because the roads are wide, and did I mention the dead flatness?
>
> Most of the race featured a noteworthy headwind on the start-finish
> straight. This was only my second training crit of the year, owing to
> rain-outs and scheduling issues.
>
> So, I signed up for the "C" group, a matter of scheduling more than
> sandbagging, but I didn't expect to be competitive in "B" quite yet.
> Nonetheless, I was curious as to how my fitness would be among the
> novices and first-timers.
>
> Dead flat race with lots of wind, so the early action was very limited:
> desultory attacks, minimal pace for nearly half the race. I hung near
> the front, never dropping further back than about 10th wheel.
>
> I had two capable teammates in the race, and as the prime bell finally
> rang, I was still near the front of the race, and halfway around the
> short (2km?) lap, I started shouting at my teammates to get in line. At
> that point I was about 4th wheel, more or less, with the leaders showing
> no interest in attacking.
>
> So I dragged it out, and lead out my teammate for the prime sprint.
>
> You know you're pulling pretty well when you launch your teammate to the
> prime and still finish second in the sprint. I'm sure he enjoyed me
> yelling "faster!" at him as he crossed the line.
>
> As soon as I crossed the line, I was bagged, and four riders (including
> my other teammate) formed up a break. 1:4 struck me as good odds, so I
> slipped into the pack to recover, and I came good within a lap.
>
> At that point, I spent the rest of the race near the front of the chase
> group with my prime-winning teammate, just watching the leaders gain a
> few seconds per lap. They stayed away, with me doing nothing to help the
> chasers.
>
> So now it's a sprint for fifth place. Blah blah blah, some guys went
> sorta fast, I stayed near the front on their wheels, another guy went
> fast, I found a few inches between two guys, I went really fast, and I
> walked away with the bunch sprint handily, looking genuinely powerful as
> I finished.
>
> My teammate in the break got fourth.
>
> Lessons: sprint is still there. On flat courses, I probably don't
> deserve to race with the "C" group now. But hey, I am a fat Cat 4. The
> finish sprint looked impressive, but the part I am happiest about was
> smoothly leading out my teammate, and recovering from the effort without
> blowing up and getting spit out the back. The only thing left to decide
> is whether I should sandbag this series until they kick me to "B", or
> voluntarily move.
>
> You should come to Vancouver Joseph: the racing would suit you quite
> nicely!
>
> --
> Ryan Cousineau rcous...@gmail.comhttp://www.wiredcola.com/
> "In other newsgroups, they killfile trolls."
> "In rec.bicycles.racing, we coach them."


Ryan,

Sounds like fun! We need pics!

I detect a common theme. Yelling! This should not be underestimated as
a motivational tool.

If the racing is good, and the field size is good, I think you should
stick to the C's until you podium. Then you can think about moving to
B. Don't worry about the others, I mean somebody has to lose, right?
If group C is wasting your time, move. But otherwise punish them for a
while.

I'd like to have a go at a race like that. I might wuss out in the
corners, and the repeated accelerations might wipe me out, but not
being worried about crashing into trees, rocks, or oncoming tractors
might put me at enough ease to make up for it.

Joseph
post #3 of 6

Re: Race Report: fattie master self-esteem sandbag crit!

In article
<rcousine-C64159.20231422052008@[74.223.185.199.nw.nuvox.net]>,
Ryan Cousineau <rcousine@gmail.com> wrote:
> Lessons: sprint is still there. On flat courses, I probably don't
> deserve to race with the "C" group now. But hey, I am a fat Cat 4. The
> finish sprint looked impressive, but the part I am happiest about was
> smoothly leading out my teammate, and recovering from the effort without
> blowing up and getting spit out the back. The only thing left to decide
> is whether I should sandbag this series until they kick me to "B", or
> voluntarily move.


Stay in C learning how to win.

--
Michael Press
post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Re: Race Report: fattie master self-esteem sandbag crit!

In article
<8df737d1-8334-46d3-acc0-425d8a2dfc21@e53g2000hsa.googlegroups.com>,
"joseph.santaniello@gmail.com" <joseph.santaniello@gmail.com> wrote:

> On May 23, 5:23 am, Ryan Cousineau <rcous...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Due to a confluence of events, it was easy for me to get to tonight's
> > mid-week training crit, a dead-flat industrial park crit which I favor
> > because the roads are wide, and did I mention the dead flatness?


> > Lessons: sprint is still there. On flat courses, I probably don't
> > deserve to race with the "C" group now. But hey, I am a fat Cat 4. The
> > finish sprint looked impressive, but the part I am happiest about was
> > smoothly leading out my teammate, and recovering from the effort without
> > blowing up and getting spit out the back. The only thing left to decide
> > is whether I should sandbag this series until they kick me to "B", or
> > voluntarily move.
> >
> > You should come to Vancouver Joseph: the racing would suit you quite
> > nicely!


> Ryan,
>
> Sounds like fun! We need pics!
>
> I detect a common theme. Yelling! This should not be underestimated as
> a motivational tool.
>
> If the racing is good, and the field size is good, I think you should
> stick to the C's until you podium. Then you can think about moving to
> B. Don't worry about the others, I mean somebody has to lose, right?
> If group C is wasting your time, move. But otherwise punish them for a
> while.
>
> I'd like to have a go at a race like that. I might wuss out in the
> corners, and the repeated accelerations might wipe me out, but not
> being worried about crashing into trees, rocks, or oncoming tractors
> might put me at enough ease to make up for it.
>
> Joseph


The road is only open to the yellow line, but as with most industrial
parks, that half of the road is about 10m wide. The corners are not
really challenging, as well as being smooth and well-paved. I'm not a
spectacularly aggressive cornerer, but these corners were easy and if
anything, I was making time in them. You barely even need to stop
pedaling.

I somehow forgot to mention the most LIVEDRUNK part: I left a
work-related conference a bit early to go directly to this event. The
very last thing I did before leaving the conference was finish my glass
of red wine, and I had nothing to eat from that glass until after the
race (I did have some, sigh, water on the bike).

--
Ryan Cousineau rcousine@gmail.com http://www.wiredcola.com/
"In other newsgroups, they killfile trolls."
"In rec.bicycles.racing, we coach them."
post #5 of 6

LOL!  Found this thread while searching for a spot to stick my masters race report from the past weekend...that I happen to know of the person that started this thread and somewhat familiar with his sense of humor made it all the better; title of the thread notwithstanding...

 

75k or so (12 lap, 6k+ circuit) of rolling hills course in rural, bucolic Langley (35k east of Vancouver). 

Australian pursuit style racing with the 70+ starting first 6min before the 60+, 50+ 5min after 60+, 40+ 4min after 50+, 30+ 3min after 40+.

 

Firgure my fitness was decent enough to be competitive and at least finish with this group of old fatty geezersbiggrin.gif.  Well, I guess I need to start accepting that getting to be an old geezer too, but fatty?  Never!  LOL!

 

No warm-up(!) - too cold (6C) considering the amount of time I'd have to wait on the starting before our group would start.  No use getting some sweat going to have it go cold on me while standing around for 11min.  Don't know if this was such a good idea in hindsight as I almost got dropped during the 2nd or 3rd lap because my legs didn't feel like clearing after going up one of the short (50m), steep (~10%) hills.  Somehow I was able to get back on after leaving a gap of 10m or so.  Had no futher issues after that as the legs came around, but for a moment I definitely thought I was resigned to riding the course off the back. 

 

Took a few pulls on the front and rode most of the race in the front half of the relatively small group - better position to stay out of any potential trouble.  Heard noises of a crash come from behind, but didn't confirm.  There was a confirmed pile-up of 6 or so in the 30+ group.  Course was clear and safe, so must've been inattention.

 

Fast forward to around 3 laps to go and we catch the 50+ group (had sometime ago passed the 60+ groups).  About 25 of us continue together with attacks here and there, but nothing significant due to the swirling winds and punchy nature of the course. 

 

Course was big ring entirely (for me anyway) so you know on those hills the legs would get loaded up regularly because it was 8w+/kg to stay in contact.  Yellow line rule was in effect and with the wind coming at varying angles, it made it an exercise to stay in the draft at times, but for the most part we were protected by trees and the rolling terrain.

 

Came down to a bunch sprint with about 15 in the main group and the other 10 or so a few seconds behind.  Unfortunately for me there was a slight rise to crest before the line and I knew that was going to hurt my sprint significantly - and I was right.  Had pretty much nothing (800w or so) left and didn't get out of the saddle.  Another racer came around me for 9th, so I ended up 10th overall and 4th in my age group.

 

The overall winner was a very punchy little guy in my age group who gapped (10m or so) the field nicely on the small hill to the finish line.

 

Overall a good effort.  Around 38.5k average speed for 1h56m duration.  298w NP.  250w AP.

 

Results and photos: http://duanebc.com/raceresults2011/BC%20Master%20Races%202011/Langley4_17_11.htm

 

Had fun with the "fattie masters" this past Sunday.  LOL!  Looking forward to doing it again.  Definitely not as cut-throat as racing in the regular Cat. 3 groups - and I'm okay with that at this time in the season...

post #6 of 6

Late start to my race season - low motivation and high weight (~200lbs, would like to be 195 around this time) makes for a late racing season start.  LOL!

Flat, oblong Thursday night club crit.  18 laps on a 1.3k circuit.  Raced in the B group (cat. 3 and 4) instead of A group (1,2,3) as I did last year.  Low confidence in form.

Good pace (~42kph average speed).  On the front for a turn, but mostly stayed in the front 5 (~15 in the group) and out of the gusting wind.  Would have a headwind for the finish line so knew to wait til the last moment to open up.

Pace was very steady with a few 50kph+ attacks - but not the obvious on/off like last year which was main reason I went up to the A group in the first place.  The one moment 50kph down to 35kph the next moment got stupid, IMO.  The A group is always smoother (and faster, of course).  A group started a few minutes before us and never caught us so that means their pace was pretty similar for the first race of the season.

Legs were still pretty tender going into the race from just too much riding around; lots of unfocused riding left my form not so good and my legs tired.  Took half the race before I really felt "warmed up". 

Making a short story shorter, a young guy who appeared very fit the entire race took off after winning the last prime with 4 laps to go and stayed away for the solo win.  No cohesiveness in the group meant he was not coming back.  During the pack sprint another guy kinda jumped in behind a car turning onto the course (industrial area, course not closed) in front of us and built a big gap (30meters) on the group with about 400 meters to go.  Sitting around 5th wheel I open up with about 200 meters.  Lost out on 2nd place by about a tire.  Good sprint though - 58kph into a mild headwind is acceptable.  Didn't run with the PT, so unfortunately no power numbers review. 

Told myself before the race that I finished in the top 3 I'll do the A race the following week.

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