or Connect
Cycling Forums › Forums › Bikes › Bike buying advice › Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I'm looking at getting a modern bike (from by 30 year-old Raleigh....), and am comparing the Trek 2.3 (2010) with the Specialized Allez Comp (also 2010), and would be interested in opinions.

The Trek 2.3 dropped the carbon seat-stays that the 2009 model had, but the aluminum frame has the same geometry as the lower-level Madone models. It has full 105 components, not just derailleurs and levers, but also the crank and brakes. In this regard, the 2.3 is actually a bit better equipped than the lowest-level Madone 4.5, where of course you are paying more for the frame.

The highest-level Specialized Allez (Comp) seems more or less comparable to the Trek 2.3 - on the plus side it has carbon seat says, and is mostly 105, but some other things seem not as good, including cheaper brakes.

I rode both bikes, but my correct frame size wasn't available in either, so it was a bit difficult to compare.

For either choice I want to get a compact double, rather than the triple, for better shifting at the front.

I also happened to test ride a 2009 base-level Roubaix, again at about the same price. It is a carbon frame, but not the same frame as the better Roubaix models. It was the right frame size, so again it was hard to compare it to the others. It seemed (as would be expected, I guess) a bit smoother, but perhaps less lively than the other two. I'm a big, heavy guy, so I'm a bit inclined to go with aluminum from a durability perspective, versus a lower-end carbon frame. Although the all-alum. frame of the Trek might be a bit more jarring over bumps, I didn't really feel anything objectionable over a short test ride. Maybe the formed aluminum frames have been made a bit more compliant than older aluminum frames were?

Anyway, I'd welcome any feedback on the above bikes. I will also try to check out a Felt 75, and a comparably-priced Jamis model, based on having seen some good reviews. Although I'll have to look for a store that carries them. My rough price range (store prices) is in the $1500 to maybe $1800 range. The Allez Comp might be a bit less than this - the other two were in the $1500+ range.
post #2 of 7

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

You won't know until you ride'em. Between the 2.3 and the Allez, I've heard some say the Allez has a smoother ride, and many like the longer head tube, but the Allez is also a bit heavier and long in the top tube.

With the Roubaix you're looking at a base-level full carbon "endurance" bike. Then you owe it to yourself to look at all base-level carbon bikes like the Madone 4.5, Felt F5, and Cannondale Six Carbon 6, and then the base-level carbon endurance bikes like the Giant Defy, Felt Z5 and Z6, and Cannondale Synapse Carbon 6. To me, the Roubaix is plush, the Madone and F5 are sweet but the F5 has a traditional short head tube; the Z5 would be my choice over the Roubaix when I turn 75, and I just don't know enough about the Synapse and the Defy.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

Thanks, Oldbobcat,

Most of the base-level carbon frame choices are more than I want to spend, or, they are less well-equipped in order to partly make up for the more expensive frame. The reason for the base-level Roubaix being on my list was that one of the shops I've been to had a 2009 at a good price (although it had a triple crank, which I don't really want).

As mentioned above, I've ridden both the 2.3 and the Allez, but both were in a too-small frame size, so I couldn't really judge the fit. Hope to ride the right frame size in both this weekend.

With my size and weight, I'm thinking more and more that the disadvantages of aluminum may not really be disadvantages for me. It also seems like the newer hydroformed aluminum frames have become somewhat more comfortable. And I don't think that I want anything that's too compliant...
post #4 of 7

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rschleicher View Post
Thanks, Oldbobcat,

Most of the base-level carbon frame choices are more than I want to spend, or, they are less well-equipped in order to partly make up for the more expensive frame.
The more familiar I become with the Roubaix geometry, the more I see it as adaptive, the sort of thing that appeals to older riders who tend toward physical and motivational inflexibility. It's the "I ride all day and I don't care that I can't touch my toes because I'm not a racer" attitude.

If that's not you, go for a well equipped alloy bike with a standard geometry--you won't be as likely to develop postural bad habits and you can upgrade the frame or more easily trade or sell the bike when you're ready.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

So, another bike has entered the picture for me - the Scott CR1 Team. It's somewhat more than the others I've been considering, but it's a nice carbon frame design, full 105 including brakes and crank, etc. At just under $2,000 it seems like a very good value.
post #6 of 7

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rschleicher View Post
At just under $2,000 it seems like a very good value.
Yah, if you can get a good fit on it, grab it.
post #7 of 7

Re: Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rschleicher View Post
So, another bike has entered the picture for me - the Scott CR1 Team. It's somewhat more than the others I've been considering, but it's a nice carbon frame design, full 105 including brakes and crank, etc. At just under $2,000 it seems like a very good value.
If you don't hate your Raleigh, why don't you simply have it retrofitted with 105-or-Ultegra components (since you are focused on Shimano components) + a new wheelset?

I recommend Campagnolo shifters, FWIW ... they are readily compatible with some combinations ... otherwise, they can be made compatible.

So, I would actually recommend that you have the Raleigh retrofitted with a blend of components -- a mix of all Shimano OR a blend of Campagnolo shifters + everything else Shimano.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Bike buying advice
Cycling Forums › Forums › Bikes › Bike buying advice › Trek 2.3 vs. Specialized Allez Comp (or maybe the base-level Roubaix)?