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Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm 6'5" and about 310 lbs. A few months ago, I bought a mountain bike (Norco Bigfoot 22") and most days I ride 10-15 miles of trails, with a little tricky stuff here and there. I am getting fitter every day. At first, I was nervous about getting a bike, since some years ago I bent a steel frame rear wheel on my way up a hill, but I seem to be able to ride this bike hard. I had to replace the factory spokes with hand-made ones and go to a thick 2.125 tube in the rear wheel, to avoid pinch flats. Other than that, no problems. Now I'm thinking I'd like to try a road bike. Is it possible to get a production (that is, reasonably priced) bike that won't bend or break on me?
post #2 of 16

Re: Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

I was 275 or 265 when I started on my racing bike. I posted a pic of it on another message of pcis of bikes.
the frame is sure solid. I have worried about the tires. they seemed to loose air every couple of days and the sidewall of the rear tire started falling apart. but new tires and no problems since.
a good steel frame is sure strong enough.
post #3 of 16

Re: Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

Quote:
Originally posted by jrc
I'm 6'5" and about 310 lbs. A few months ago, I bought a mountain bike (Norco Bigfoot 22") and most days I ride 10-15 miles of trails, with a little tricky stuff here and there. I am getting fitter every day. At first, I was nervous about getting a bike, since some years ago I bent a steel frame rear wheel on my way up a hill, but I seem to be able to ride this bike hard. I had to replace the factory spokes with hand-made ones and go to a thick 2.125 tube in the rear wheel, to avoid pinch flats. Other than that, no problems. Now I'm thinking I'd like to try a road bike. Is it possible to get a production (that is, reasonably priced) bike that won't bend or break on me?
I suggest you consider a touring bicycle like the Trek 520.
It comes with a strong steel frame, strong wheels, fatter tires.
Many "racing" style road bikes have quite limited room for tires.
REI also makes a "touring" bicycle called the Randonee. I would rely on a reputable local bicycle shop to help you through the process. You should find a shop that will fit all requirements.
A wider than "normal" road handlebar like the Ritchey Pro in 46 cm center to center may help you feel more comfortable and ride more safely. The shop you pick should be willing and ready to work with you on all the variables that effect your fit.
there is some unique and valuable fitting information on Peter White Cycles web site at URL:
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm
David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
post #4 of 16

Re: Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

Although I am not quite as big as you, I am 6'3", 240lbs, we both still qualify as clydesdales. I have done some extensive research on the best road bike for me, and, based on lengthy talks with some very knowledgable people, and with multiple talks with the owner of my LBS, it looks like the Cannondale with the CAAD7/Optimo Si frame is the bike for me. Besided Cannondale, the LBS handles Litespeed, Trek, Bianchi, Colnago, Klein and Lemond, so he was not pushing the Cannondale.

It is supposedly stiff, harsh, doesn't handle well, is twitchy on descents, but these seem to be observations of those who don't ride them all that much, or are a lot smaller. There is a review of the R5000, with the same CAAD7 frame as the R1000, at roadbikerider.com

Read it and then talk to your LBS and see what they think.

For me, the R1000 or R2000 is the top of my list. Basically, normal sized people like us on these bikes do a lot of natural dampening. The wheels are Ksyrium Elites on the R1000 and Ksyrium SLs on the R2000. According to Mavic, either will support a 280lb rider with ease.

If you decide on something else, might I suggest a Mavic CXP33 rim with 36 14 gauge spokes on both wheels. Have them built by a master wheelwright. If you don't have one near you, Colorado Cyclist can build them for you.
post #5 of 16
get properly fitted and then buy a steel frame; as you're aware, the wheelset will be just as important; 36-spoke count mavics might do the trick. I would definitely consider some cylcocross wheelsets too.
post #6 of 16

Re: Re: Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

Babbar's advice is spot on the money...

I am 6foot3 and 98kgs and ride a Caad7 r1000 with Ksyrium wheels. I also use a set of cxp30 (36 spoke) deep section rims to train on. This setup works well for me.

There is another bloke in the bunch who is over 100kg's and built like a brick ****house....you guessed it...he rides a CAAD7....

Part of the reason I chose this make was because it comes in a 63cm frame....size was right...they are a rigid and responsive frame....I have no complaints and cannot understand all the complaining about them being a harsh ride....maybe the smaller riders get bounced around on the rigid frame....but I dont see this as a problem....the fact that the frame responds well is more important to me...
post #7 of 16

Re: Road Bike for a Heavy Rider

Quote:
Originally posted by jrc
I'm 6'5" and about 310 lbs. A few months ago, I bought a mountain bike (Norco Bigfoot 22") and most days I ride 10-15 miles of trails, with a little tricky stuff here and there. I am getting fitter every day. At first, I was nervous about getting a bike, since some years ago I bent a steel frame rear wheel on my way up a hill, but I seem to be able to ride this bike hard. I had to replace the factory spokes with hand-made ones and go to a thick 2.125 tube in the rear wheel, to avoid pinch flats. Other than that, no problems. Now I'm thinking I'd like to try a road bike. Is it possible to get a production (that is, reasonably priced) bike that won't bend or break on me?
I have had the same problems as I am 6'3'' and 270lbs (110kgs). I recently changed bikes from a Trek 1200 to a Trek 2300. I was pretty hard on the Tiagra gearing and the wheels on the 1200. I broke a few spokes and had to get them all replaced. My new bike is much stronger, the gearing is better and the wheels - well that has been the only problem. I have found the Bontrager wheels have not been strong enough for constant riding (200km a week) I have broken a few spokes and have had to get a set of Mavic CXP33 with a 36 spoke set up. These I use for training and are so strong. In terms of a bike, I would stay away from a carbon frame as it would not be strong enough, look at a similar wheel to the CXP33's as training wheels as a pair of Mavic Kysrium SL's if you want a race wheel. I have been informed that these are the only medium priced race wheel that will suit my weight.
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Fantastic advice. I appreciate your time and insight. -- jrc
post #9 of 16
Another vote for the Caad7!

I am 6'2" , 220lbs and ride a r2000 with stock ksyrium wheelset. I find it very responsive and not as harsh as some people warned me it would be. It is great on climbs, and I've found it to be very stable on descents (at speeds under 50mph which is the fastest I've managed on the hill down from pepperdine on PCH!).

The more I ride it the more I like it!

Peter
post #10 of 16
The bigger boys I know ride steel, but the C-dale aluminum that would rattle my 'normal size' 160 lb body to pieces would make sense for you. And they are on the affordable end of the spectrum as well. Just don't lose TOO much weight or that aluminum frame will start to feel stiff ;-)
post #11 of 16
VERY timely thread. I'm 6'2" and 280 and looking for a road bike.

I understand that with mountain bikes the crankset can be the weak spot because big boys have to put down a lot of power on ascents. But it doesn't seem like it would be so much an issue on a road bike. Opinions?
post #12 of 16
I am 255 or so right now I am riding a steel Italian racing bike. It works great for me. My only problem is the wheels come out of true a bit because of all the bumps the bike bath has.
post #13 of 16
The master wheel builders at Erapro in Pennsylvania are very knowledgeable professionals. They can get you on a good set of hand made 'bullt proof' wheels that you can enjoy for several years.

You should be able to get the phone number from the website.

www.erapro.com

call them and go from there. They can ship the wheels to you. You will not be disappointed.
post #14 of 16
I like what I see of the Cannondale frame, but I'm not sure I'm ready to spend that much yet.

What are the alternatives in steel?
post #15 of 16
I weigh 213 was u0p to 230 I ride an Older GT roadbike frame it is aluminum but the triple triangle seems to hold up to my weight better. Problem is its tough to find a GT these days.
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