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Male patients and female doctors

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Wow, this post was met with *fabulous* silence the first time I put it out, on sci.med. Is there
something inane about my inquiry, which I'm not aware of, or is the topic just too uncomfortable?
Well, either way, I'm giving it a second try, and posting to misc.health.alternative and
soc.feminism this time, in addition to sci.med. Maybe I'll have better luck...

===============================

Some prolog, before I get to the main question... I am a man, mid-fourties. In the past I have
always seen male doctors. At this point in my life, I am starting to have a number of medical issues
that I have not experienced before -- some problems with high blood pressure, and rapid pulse, among
other things. I also have urinary frequency, and some sleep issues (long standing problems), and
muscle spasms in response to tension. I *also* have ongoing issues with depression and anxiety,
which are being treated (fairly effectively) with medication.

About eight months ago I had to switch health care plans, from an HMO to a preferred provider
organization, and I picked up a new doctor. He's a good man, but he seems a bit impatient at times
with my laundry list of ailments.

I would be the first to admit I worry about my health, and probably have a mild tendency towards
hypochondria. I am always respectful to doctors, but with all my worries I am sure I'm not the
easiest patient in the world. I am also a rather "touchy feely" kind of guy, very artsie, and need a
certain amount of emotional handholding. At the same time, the medical issues are very real -- there
is no question my blood pressure and pulse have increased a great deal in the past year or so -- and
need carefuly monitoring and treatment. (One of my concerns is that I think one of the medicines my
doctor put me on for the blood pressure issue may actually be causing the rapid pulse. This is based
on anecdotal accounts on the Internet, which the doctor does not seem to take seriously.)

So, that's the background. I have always seen male doctors in the past, because, frankly, if I'm
going to have someone check my private

a guy. But I think I need to find another doctor, and I am wondering if I would not be better off
with a woman. I have several questions, in no particular order of priority:

First, I have this expectation that female doctors might be better listeners, and might be more
patient with my various anxieties. But then again, that may be an unfounded bias, so I'd be
interested to hear from both patients and doctors (especially female doctors) about whether this
generalization is valid.

Second, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are with male patients, especially when it comes
to doing those kinds of exams which are necessary for males (I don't think I need to name them
here). Also, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are in discussing

Third, I would like to hear from men who have used female doctors. Have you found it to be a
comfortable experience? Do the female doctors seem comfortable working with you?

Thanks in advance for all replies, and any insights you can offer.

CJ
post #2 of 4

Re: Male patients and female doctors

Charles Jones writes:

> Second, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are with male patients, especially when it
> comes to doing those kinds of exams which are necessary for males (I don't think I need to name
> them here). Also, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are in discussing

It's kind of a false issue. The problems and considerations of opposite

which role. The only difference is that male doctors are usually consider much more suspect than
female doctors (and are statistically more likely to abuse, although that may in part be due to a
double standard of abuse to begin with). Male doctors have chaperones for female patients; I don't
believe the same is true for female doctors treating male patients (at least I was not chaperoned
when I've seen female doctors).

--
Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
post #3 of 4

Re: Male patients and female doctors

The three previous posters answering your question are "real retarded". The bottom line is that you
don't worry it, or even think about it. At present 50+% of all physicians graduating are women. They
will all look at your balls, your weenie, and your rectal orifice with far more objectivity than you
have about the same structures.

Charles Jones wrote:
>
> Wow, this post was met with *fabulous* silence the first time I put it out, on sci.med. Is there
> something inane about my inquiry, which I'm not aware of, or is the topic just too uncomfortable?
> Well, either way, I'm giving it a second try, and posting to misc.health.alternative and
> soc.feminism this time, in addition to sci.med. Maybe I'll have better luck...
>
> ===============================
>
> Some prolog, before I get to the main question... I am a man, mid-fourties. In the past I have
> always seen male doctors. At this point in my life, I am starting to have a number of medical
> issues that I have not experienced before -- some problems with high blood pressure, and rapid
> pulse, among other things. I also have urinary frequency, and some sleep issues (long standing
> problems), and muscle spasms in response to tension. I *also* have ongoing issues with depression
> and anxiety, which are being treated (fairly effectively) with medication.
>
> About eight months ago I had to switch health care plans, from an HMO to a preferred provider
> organization, and I picked up a new doctor. He's a good man, but he seems a bit impatient at times
> with my laundry list of ailments.
>
> I would be the first to admit I worry about my health, and probably have a mild tendency towards
> hypochondria. I am always respectful to doctors, but with all my worries I am sure I'm not the
> easiest patient in the world. I am also a rather "touchy feely" kind of guy, very artsie, and need
> a certain amount of emotional handholding. At the same time, the medical issues are very real --
> there is no question my blood pressure and pulse have increased a great deal in the past year or
> so -- and need carefuly monitoring and treatment. (One of my concerns is that I think one of the
> medicines my doctor put me on for the blood pressure issue may actually be causing the rapid
> pulse. This is based on anecdotal accounts on the Internet, which the doctor does not seem to take
> seriously.)
>
> So, that's the background. I have always seen male doctors in the past, because, frankly, if I'm
> going to have someone check my private

> a guy. But I think I need to find another doctor, and I am wondering if I would not be better off
> with a woman. I have several questions, in no particular order of priority:
>
> First, I have this expectation that female doctors might be better listeners, and might be more
> patient with my various anxieties. But then again, that may be an unfounded bias, so I'd be
> interested to hear from both patients and doctors (especially female doctors) about whether this
> generalization is valid.
>
> Second, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are with male patients, especially when it
> comes to doing those kinds of exams which are necessary for males (I don't think I need to name
> them here). Also, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are in discussing

>
> Third, I would like to hear from men who have used female doctors. Have you found it to be a
> comfortable experience? Do the female doctors seem comfortable working with you?
>
> Thanks in advance for all replies, and any insights you can offer.
>
> CJ
post #4 of 4

Re: Male patients and female doctors

The three previous posters answering your question are "real retarded". The bottom line is that you
don't worry it, or even think about it. At present 50+% of all physicians graduating are women. They
will all look at your balls, your weenie, and your rectal orifice with far more objectivity than you
have about the same structures.

Charles Jones wrote:
>
> Wow, this post was met with *fabulous* silence the first time I put it out, on sci.med. Is there
> something inane about my inquiry, which I'm not aware of, or is the topic just too uncomfortable?
> Well, either way, I'm giving it a second try, and posting to misc.health.alternative and
> soc.feminism this time, in addition to sci.med. Maybe I'll have better luck...
>
> ===============================
>
> Some prolog, before I get to the main question... I am a man, mid-fourties. In the past I have
> always seen male doctors. At this point in my life, I am starting to have a number of medical
> issues that I have not experienced before -- some problems with high blood pressure, and rapid
> pulse, among other things. I also have urinary frequency, and some sleep issues (long standing
> problems), and muscle spasms in response to tension. I *also* have ongoing issues with depression
> and anxiety, which are being treated (fairly effectively) with medication.
>
> About eight months ago I had to switch health care plans, from an HMO to a preferred provider
> organization, and I picked up a new doctor. He's a good man, but he seems a bit impatient at times
> with my laundry list of ailments.
>
> I would be the first to admit I worry about my health, and probably have a mild tendency towards
> hypochondria. I am always respectful to doctors, but with all my worries I am sure I'm not the
> easiest patient in the world. I am also a rather "touchy feely" kind of guy, very artsie, and need
> a certain amount of emotional handholding. At the same time, the medical issues are very real --
> there is no question my blood pressure and pulse have increased a great deal in the past year or
> so -- and need carefuly monitoring and treatment. (One of my concerns is that I think one of the
> medicines my doctor put me on for the blood pressure issue may actually be causing the rapid
> pulse. This is based on anecdotal accounts on the Internet, which the doctor does not seem to take
> seriously.)
>
> So, that's the background. I have always seen male doctors in the past, because, frankly, if I'm
> going to have someone check my private

> a guy. But I think I need to find another doctor, and I am wondering if I would not be better off
> with a woman. I have several questions, in no particular order of priority:
>
> First, I have this expectation that female doctors might be better listeners, and might be more
> patient with my various anxieties. But then again, that may be an unfounded bias, so I'd be
> interested to hear from both patients and doctors (especially female doctors) about whether this
> generalization is valid.
>
> Second, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are with male patients, especially when it
> comes to doing those kinds of exams which are necessary for males (I don't think I need to name
> them here). Also, I am curious how comfortable female doctors are in discussing

>
> Third, I would like to hear from men who have used female doctors. Have you found it to be a
> comfortable experience? Do the female doctors seem comfortable working with you?
>
> Thanks in advance for all replies, and any insights you can offer.
>
> CJ
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