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Gloves for below freezing conditions...  

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
right thing.

Matt O.
post #2 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

Quote:
Originally posted by Matt O'Toole
Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
right thing.

Matt O.
PI Lobsters work well for cold, but you will need to see how they work for grip and lever control.
Layer a polypropelene (sp?) under your glove of choice if the fit isn't too tight or
layer a larger size cycling glove over your exisiting PI lightweights.
post #3 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

"Matt O'Toole" <matt@deltanet.com> wrote in message
news:W0ZSb.7810$9p5.113@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my
hands warm
> while riding my road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter
gloves
> are fine down to about freezing, but below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves
> are fine, but they're too clumsy for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind
> spending some money for
exactly
> the right thing.

There was a recent discussion on the Mass Bike email list. That would be a great place to look,
since it gets REALLY cold around here ... not a balmy 20+ (c:

http://www.massbike.org/

There were some good suggestions ... the one I like the most is to make or buy a windscreen for
your hands.

C.Q.C.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

Q. wrote:
> "Matt O'Toole" <matt@deltanet.com> wrote in message
> news:W0ZSb.7810$9p5.113@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
>> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
>> road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
>> below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
>> for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
>> right thing.
>
> There was a recent discussion on the Mass Bike email list. That would be a great place to look,
> since it gets REALLY cold around here ... not a balmy 20+ (c:
>
> http://www.massbike.org/
>
> There were some good suggestions ... the one I like the most is to make or buy a windscreen for
> your hands.

Thanks for the pointer. The PI lobster mitts seemed to get a bunch of votes. I'll check them out.

Matt O.
post #5 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

"Matt O'Toole" wrote ...
> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my
hands warm
> while riding my road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter
gloves
> are fine down to about freezing, but below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves
> are fine, but they're too clumsy for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind
> spending some money for
exactly
> the right thing.
>
> Matt O.

My PI Lobster Mitts have worked for me down to 0 deg F, but I'm not sure if they would allow the
manual dexterity you want for STI (I use barcons). Another solution would be a pair of glove liners
for your present gloves. Ski shops and mountaineering shops sell silk and synthetic liners in
various thicknesses.

I'm convinced that part of keeping the extremities (toes/fingers) warm is keeping the entire body
warm, especially the head, neck, and torso. Are you wearing some kind of hat under your helmet when
you cycle?
--
mark
post #6 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

Matt O'Toole wrote:
> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
> road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
> below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
> for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
> right thing.
>
> Matt O.
>
>

I use to wear some Nalini Windstopper gloves, I guess they are like your Pearl Izumis: lightweight
and fine until you reach about 3°C. My solution for colder days is to wear a pair of wool gloves
below the Nalinis. While the windstopper keeps the air away, the wool keep hands hot. Grip is
perfect, STI control is fine and I had no problem well under 0°C!

Francesco
post #7 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

What works is very individual, depending on what triggers your blood flow to shut down to the
fingers. Once it shuts down, you'll freeze no matter what you're wearing.

The chief effect in my case is from keeping the wrist warm.

It was -2 degrees F Friday night when I got home, and I was okay but barely with (inner to outer)
3 silk gloves (L XL XL) Nashbar polartec mittens (L) Kroger produce baggie LL Bean windstopper
shell (XL)

the baggie trapping condensation but also keeping just that little extra drifting cold out, or maybe
making hand motion pump hot air around rather than out of the arrangement. Normally there's no
baggie and only 2 silk gloves, and that's fine to about 20 degrees F.

The two modes of attack are
1. Keep blood flow from shutting down.
2. If it does, keep hands warm anyway for duration of the ride, but this is a losing proposition
if the ride goes on and on indefinitely.
--
Ron Hardin rhhardin@mindspring.com

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
post #8 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

At any given thickness, ski gloves by Toko/Yoko and Sinisalo seem warmer to me than Pearl Izumi.

But if you're using PI and like it, and are not using the heaviest model, go to the next
heavier model.

Also, be sure you are warm enough all-around. The body is a system and if you're not warm enough it
starts cutting off heat to the extremities first.

JT
post #9 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

"Matt O'Toole" <matt@deltanet.com> wrote in message
news:W0ZSb.7810$9p5.113@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands
warm
> while riding my road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter
gloves
> are fine down to about freezing, but below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves
> are fine, but they're too clumsy for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind
> spending some money for
exactly
> the right thing.

STI can be a problem with bulky gloves. If you're like a lot of people, perhaps your hands get
warmer after riding for a half hour or so. In that case, perhaps you can wear an extra layer over
your current gloves, like a plain or wind-stopper fleece glove, pocketing them once your hands get
warmed up. The PI gloves (if they're like mine) have thin palms, and the h-bars suck the heat right
out, a fleece over-layer helps that. Layering gloves gives lots of mix 'n match alternatives for
different weather conditions, allows temperature tuning while riding, and, in the kind of very cold
weather we've had recently, avoids bare-handed repairs. Plus, it's a cheap way to go...
post #10 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

"Q." <LostVideos-AT-hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:cJSdnQHambPVFIHd4p2dnA@comcast.com...
> "Matt O'Toole" <matt@deltanet.com> wrote in message
> news:W0ZSb.7810$9p5.113@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...
> > Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my
> hands warm
> > while riding my road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter
> gloves
> > are fine down to about freezing, but below that they're not enough. On
my
> > mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is
> > good, but I don't mind spending some money for
> exactly
> > the right thing.
>
> There was a recent discussion on the Mass Bike email list. That would be
a
> great place to look, since it gets REALLY cold around here ... not a balmy 20+ (c:
>
> http://www.massbike.org/
>
> There were some good suggestions ... the one I like the most is to make or buy a windscreen for
> your hands.
>
> C.Q.C.
>
Go check out a motorcycle shop. They make these big ole bags that fit over the steering controls on
motorcycles that should work for mtn bikes or brifters. Better for Ergo than STI at a guess. Keep
motorcyclist's hands warm at highway speeds probably means overkill for cyclists, but better warm
than cold!

Mike
post #11 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

"daveornee" <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote in message
news:jI_Sb.51854$k%1.47044@fe20.usenetserver.com...
> Matt O'Toole wrote:
> > Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding
> > my road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about
> > freezing, but below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but
> > they're too clumsy for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I
don't
> > mind spending some money for exactly the right thing. Matt O.
>
>
> PI Lobsters work well for cold, but you will need to see how they work for grip and lever control.
> Layer a polypropelene (sp?) under your glove of choice if the fit isn't too tight or layer a
> larger size cycling glove over your exisiting PI lightweights.

I second the motion for Lobster Claws.

Mike
post #12 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

In article <W0ZSb.7810$9p5.113@nwrddc02.gnilink.net>, "Matt O'Toole"
<matt@deltanet.com> writes:

>Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
>road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
>below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
>for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
>right thing.

A pair of fleece gloves over the PI lightweight gloves.

Tom Gibb <TBGibb@aol.com
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Frozen STIs, was Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

David Kerber wrote:

> In article <bvj123$s2gre$1@ID-81487.news.uni-berlin.de>, tsherman@qconline.com says...

>> mark wrote:

>> My suggestion would be to switch to bar-end shifters. The only shifters I have seen that stop
>> functioning on a fairly frequent basis in cold weather are STI's.
>
> I've ridden my Tiagra STI's down to 0°F with no problems. They're only 4 months old, though...

My Ultegras are not much older, and I've been having problems lately. I posted about this already.
As suggested, flushing them seems worth a try. I just haven't gotten around to it yet.

Matt O.
post #14 of 14

Re: Gloves for below freezing conditions...

Matt O'Toole wrote:

> Since it's been cold here lately (20s F), I've had trouble keeping my hands warm while riding my
> road bike. My favorite Pearl Izumi lightweight winter gloves are fine down to about freezing, but
> below that they're not enough. On my mountain bike ski gloves are fine, but they're too clumsy
> for STI. Any suggestions? Cheap is good, but I don't mind spending some money for exactly the
> right thing.

One word: mittens. Not gloves, mittens. Lobster claws are 'tweeners.

I've used mittens for many years and with Shimano STI, barend, and old bartop MTB shifters. Never a
problem for me.

You don't need anything expensive. If it doesn't violate your principles, get some leather shells,
maybe with some wool or other furry lining inside. You can wear a liner glove under the mittens so
your hands don't freeze when you need to take the mitten off to lock the bike up.

I've used 'em all -- gloves of all types, lobster claws, mittens. Below freezing, I get out the
mittens. I have a pair of cheap department store mittens for weather above, say, 15-20 F. I have a
pair of leather mitts with wool inside (mmmm, toasty) that I use on colder days.

Dave dvt at psu dot edu
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