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How to train for first 100k Ride?  

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
Hi

Better introduce myself as
injured-runner-using-old-bike-to-maintain-fitness-until-injury-cleared-up.

Call me Roger for short

Any suggestions on the training required to get an "infrequent" cyclist of reasonable fitness up to
readiness for a 100k ride (to complete an Audax on flattish course within the permitted time limit).

With running marathons the key sessions were a long-slow-slog, a race-pace-steady-session and
occasional fast-intervals-with-recoveries. Plus of course easy leisurely recovery runs.

Is it the same when trying to train for a bike event?

RC
post #2 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

On 02 Feb 2003 11:43:40 GMT, clogicrogerc@aol.com (CLogicRogerC) wrote:

>Any suggestions on the training required to get an "infrequent" cyclist of reasonable fitness
>up to readiness for a 100k ride (to complete an Audax on flattish course within the permitted
>time limit).

At the risk of being trite,

1. Get on bike
2. Ride
3. Repeat

The critical thing is to make sure your bike is in good fettle and well adjusted - bad fit or
mechanical breakdown is more likely to terminate your endeavour than lack of fitness, being as what
as you is a runner anyway.

A 100k Audax is really not an immense distance, especially for someone who is tolerably fit anyway.
The time challenge is not punishing either. I ride 15 miles a day round trip to work, and that keeps
me fit enough to do a century (100 miles) at will with no special training. Any of the club's Sunday
runs (which can be 80 miles or more) is well within my capabilities, again with no preparation.

But if you're really keen to measure how well you could do, I recommend that you find the local CTC
District Association (<http://www.ctc.org.uk>) and ride along on some of their shorter Sunday runs
to test the water - you will probably be surrounded by people who will be able to help if you have
issues with knee discomfort or anything. You don't need to be a member to ride along, and you'll
have a chance to assess some local teashops :-)

I reckon that you'll be doing the 80 mile Brisk ride within a few weeks, and will be shooting for
Paris-Brest-Paris and that custom Roberts within a month. Hang on, I'll get me bike....

Guy
===
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post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

<<I ride 15 miles a day round trip to work, and that keeps me fit enough to do a century (100 miles)
at will with no special training. Any of the club's Sunday runs (which can be 80 miles or more) is
well within my capabilities, again with no preparation.>>

Wow, thats v different to running, where you really need "time on your feet" in training to complete
a long event....that was the reason for my question really.

In changing from running to cycling I didn't want to set unrealistic goals and then not train
appropriately.

I'll carry on doing my short (3 miles each way) commute 3 times a week and chuck in one "long slow
ramble" and one faster 1-hour ride and see how it goes.

RC
post #4 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

"CLogicRogerC" <clogicrogerc@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20030202064340.00893.00000146@mb-fp.aol.com...
> Hi
>
> Better introduce myself as
> injured-runner-using-old-bike-to-maintain-fitness-until-injury-cleared-up.
>
> Call me Roger for short
>
> Any suggestions on the training required to get an "infrequent" cyclist of reasonable fitness up
> to readiness for a 100k ride (to complete an Audax
on
> flattish course within the permitted time limit).
>
> With running marathons the key sessions were a long-slow-slog, a race-pace-steady-session and
> occasional fast-intervals-with-recoveries.
Plus of
> course easy leisurely recovery runs.
>
> Is it the same when trying to train for a bike event?

It might be similar if training for a race, which you aren't.

You already have the general fitness to complete 60 miles, what you my not have is specific muscle
training which as already suggested you'll develop by riding your bike. Also your knees may have to
adjust, again building up gradually will ease them along. While trying to avoid the Grandmother/egg
scenario don't forget to allow recovery periods between rides (you probably know more about this
than me being a marathon runner).

The other thing that may hamper you on a longish ride is discomfort. Again just riding your bike for
longer distances will accustom your body and discomfort will at the least ease, but it is important
to have the bike set up correctly and have a saddle that suits you. Saddles are personal, what suits
one may not suit another but I think one general rule is to not be swayed into thinking a soft one
equates to comfort. Usually the extra padding feels nice for a start but in fact your bum squirms
around on it rather than sitting on it leading to discomfort.

Pete
post #5 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

On 02 Feb 2003 13:02:02 GMT, clogicrogerc@aol.com (CLogicRogerC) wrote:

><<I ride 15 miles a day round trip to work, and that keeps me fit enough to do a century (100
>miles) at will with no special training.

>Wow, thats v different to running, where you really need "time on your feet" in training to
>complete a long event

Yes, very different. I'm not sure what the physiological reason is, but I suspect it's mostly about
the fact that the bike supports your weight, and the gears allow you to turn the effort down to
whatever feels right. A bike is the most efficient form of transport known to humanity, of course.

>In changing from running to cycling I didn't want to set unrealistic goals and then not train
>appropriately.

I know it seems odd, but most of the audax riders I know don't train in any formal sense. They just
ride their bikes for fun, and sometimes clock up a brevet along the way.

>I'll carry on doing my short (3 miles each way) commute 3 times a week and chuck in one "long slow
>ramble" and one faster 1-hour ride and see how it goes.

That will probably do it :-) But the more the merrier - try taking the long way home sometimes.

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
post #6 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

Just do plenty of brisk 15 to 35 mile rides. That's what I do and it keeps me fit enough for the
very occasional ~100km ride - without special training or preparation at all.

~PB
post #7 of 30
Thread Starter 

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

<<Get a few miles in your legs. Start gently, increase until you are comfortable doing say
40k/25miles.>>

Cheers - thats a useful benchmark to have. In the past Ive just jumped on the bike after years of no
cycling and after 35 miles in one go Ive been v sore and with trashed muscles - aim of my question
was to get an idea of how to pace things to avoid that this time around.

Cheers,

RC
post #8 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

In article <20030202064340.00893.00000146@mb-fp.aol.com>, one of infinite monkeys
at the keyboard of clogicrogerc@aol.com (CLogicRogerC) wrote:

100k on a bike is a short ride, unless you're on "challenging" terrain.

Many years ago, we did a quick 100K in preparation for my first 'proper' cycling holiday[1]. After
nothing more than the Girton-Cambridge journey (about 4Km, flat), 100K was enough to get some
sunburn, but none of the tiredness/stiffness/soreness you might expect after unaccustomed serious
exercise. And that was after four years of debauchery, aka the student life..

If you're past a certain age, that might be different. Or maybe not, considering the number of
people doing serious rides in their eighties and even nineties[2].

[1] Cambridge to Oxford via Edinburgh and many other great places ...
[2] Now there's something to hope for ...

--
Wear your paunch with pride!
post #9 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

In message <20030202064340.00893.00000146@mb-fp.aol.com>, CLogicRogerC <clogicrogerc@aol.com> writes
>Hi
>
>Better introduce myself as
>injured-runner-using-old-bike-to-maintain-fitness-until-injury-cleared-up.
>
>Call me Roger for short
>
>Any suggestions on the training required to get an "infrequent" cyclist of reasonable fitness
>up to readiness for a 100k ride (to complete an Audax on flattish course within the permitted
>time limit).
>

I find commuting 15-20 miles every day gives a sufficient level of fitness so that I can go out and
do 50-60 miles without too many problems. Anything further than that and I would want to put in some
rides of 40-50 miles to get in better shape.

Graham
--
Graham Glen
post #10 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

This summer I did a charity ride from Chesterfield to Worcester, some 100 or so miles. 6 weeks prior
I upped my usual weekend sortie by 45 minutes or 1 hour each time and found this to be suitable. I
usually ride about 3 - 4 hours a week.

One thing that struck me was that it was only ever a 100 mile ride once, once the first mile was
covered it then became a 99 mile ride... and so on.

I reckon your own synopsis below is spot on.

Good luck !

"CLogicRogerC" <clogicrogerc@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20030202064340.00893.00000146@mb-fp.aol.com...
> Hi
>
> Better introduce myself as
> injured-runner-using-old-bike-to-maintain-fitness-until-injury-cleared-up.
>
> Call me Roger for short
>
> Any suggestions on the training required to get an "infrequent" cyclist of reasonable fitness up
> to readiness for a 100k ride (to complete an Audax
on
> flattish course within the permitted time limit).
>
> With running marathons the key sessions were a long-slow-slog, a race-pace-steady-session and
> occasional fast-intervals-with-recoveries.
Plus of
> course easy leisurely recovery runs.
>
> Is it the same when trying to train for a bike event?
>
> RC
post #11 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

In message <20030202080202.00893.00000147@mb-fp.aol.com>, CLogicRogerC <clogicrogerc@aol.com> writes
><<I ride 15 miles a day round trip to work, and that keeps me fit enough to do a century (100
>miles) at will with no special training. Any of the club's Sunday runs (which can be 80 miles or
>more) is well within my capabilities, again with no preparation.>>
>
>Wow, thats v different to running, where you really need "time on your feet" in training to
>complete a long event....that was the reason for my question really.
>
<snip>

>I'll carry on doing my short (3 miles each way) commute 3 times a week and chuck in one "long slow
>ramble" and one faster 1-hour ride and see how it goes.

Things is, while it may sound like it to you at the moment, 100K on a bike isn't actually a 'long'
event - it's the sort of distance that someone out for a day ride might do without thinking about it
(for me it depends on the teashop frequency....). If your are talking about 200k or 400k then some
more serious preparation might be in order.

If as you suggest you can get in a couple of longer rides in a week that should probably do
the trick.
--
Chris French, Leeds
post #12 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

On 02 Feb 2003 16:22:59 GMT, clogicrogerc@aol.com (CLogicRogerC) wrote:

>In the past Ive just jumped on the bike after years of no cycling and after 35 miles in one go Ive
>been v sore and with trashed muscles

Usually the result of mashing the gears or poor fit. I urge you to buy a cheap computer with
cadence, and keep your cadence above 90rpm. My average cadence is about 95-100 on an upright and
105+ on a confortable bike[1].

[1] Give in to your backside, young Jedi! The Dark Side is stronger - wind resistance is futile!

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
post #13 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

On Sun, 2 Feb 2003 22:33:14 +0000, chris French <newspost-c@chrisfrench.org> wrote:

>Things is, while it may sound like it to you at the moment, 100K on a bike isn't actually a 'long'
>event - it's the sort of distance that someone out for a day ride might do without thinking about
>it (for me it depends on the teashop frequency....). If your are talking about 200k or 400k then
>some more serious preparation might be in order.

Good point. 100k is just round the corner, really. 100 miles is not *that* far. 200k? You'll need
the Thermos and a second water bottle. Definitely.

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
post #14 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

Steve Palincsar wrote:
> On Sun, 02 Feb 2003 06:43:40 -0500, CLogicRogerC wrote:
>
..
>
> I would advise you to ignore the advice that says "just get on the bike and ride," and equally
> ignore the advice to just do some short commutes. If you aren't a cyclist, you probably should
> start in the 20 mile range and work your way up, increasing the distance by no more than 10-15%
> each time, giving yourself time between rides to recover.
>

I am sure that for most of the people on this ng, especially those of us who commute over 20 miles a
day every day, riding 100k is just a matter of doing it. It just requires a bit more time in the
saddle but no particular effort. I don't know what kind of time you would be expected to do it in at
an Audax event, but it seems a usual minimum average is 15kph and 100k at 15kph on the road and
assuming it's not all uphill, should be doable by anyone who wants to, with no more preparation than
daily commuting. Higher averages might indeed require some sort of training regime.

Rich
post #15 of 30

Re: How to train for first 100k Ride?

Steve Palincsar <palincss@his.com> wrote in message news:<3e3d865e$1_1@vienna7.his.com>...
>
> If you aren't a cyclist, you probably should start in the 20 mile range and work your way up,
> increasing the distance by no more than 10-15% each time, giving yourself time between rides to
> recover.

Great plan!

Think how much fun it could be planning those rides of 20 miles, then 22, 25, 28, 32, 36, 40, 45,
50, 56, 62. Assuming that there's no time for such long rides during the week, that's 11 weekends
devoted to the mammoth task of preparing for a fairly gentle 100k ride. I'm glad I didn't realise I
had to train so seriously before completing the 7 day Transrockies race last year.

James
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