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post #46 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

Post again about a week before your trip. Let us know how
you're doing. If I can make it, I come up and cheer you on
the second day of your trip as you will pass right by my
place up there.

Gary (it's too damn hot already! 93°F today.......)

"Redfoot" <no_spam@spam.org> wrote in message news:9ta3c.28-
797$aT1.19556@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> "Redfoot" <no_spam@spam.org> wrote in message news:ILTZb.-
> 15277$hm4.13391@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
> > Hi, my brother talked me into signing up for a 7-day /
> > 6-night mountain
bike
> > ride from Telluride, CO to Moab, UT coming up early June
> > (mostly fire
trails).
> > Trouble is that as a parent of a very young child, and
> > also finishing up
a
> > graduate degree in EE and working fulltime, I've become
> > grossly
overwight and
> > have not train in almost a year. I'm 6'0" tall and 240
> > pounds, yeah I'm normally heavyset anyweigh (usually
> > around 200 even if at fighting
weight) but
> I
> > am scared now because I'm afraid I won't be able to cut
> > it unless I
seriously
> > lose some weight and get training.
> >
> > I was wondering if someone could point me to a resource
> > which would not
only
> > recommend some good training regimen, but also spellout
> > a good diet for
losing
> > some extra weight. Ideally an online "diary" type of
> > thing where I
could
> input
> > my food for the day, it would count calories, and also
> > what I did in the
gym
> or
> > on the road that day. Or does it make sense to hire a
> > personal trainer
for
> > this?
> >
> > Sorry if I come across like an idiot - but maybe I am!
> > Is it too much
to
> expect
> > to lose 40 pounds in 3+ months and also get into
> > reasonalbe shape to
finish
> the
> > ride? It's probably 35 miles a day at avg. 8000 t.
> > elevation - I'm not
> looking
> > to set any records, but I don't want to die of
> > exhaustion either.
> >
> > TIA,
> >
> > Fat Red
> >
> >
> >
>
> Hello, and thanks to all who took the time to respond to
> my post. Some
good
> advice and some good support.
>
> I began my regimen two weeks ago today, and weighed in at
> 238.5 at that
point.
> As of yesterday morning, I'm down to 234.0, so although
> that's not too
huge of a
> drop, it *is* 4.5 pounds in two weeks, which is probably
> all I can hope
for if I
> want to lose the weight safely. My hope is that if I keep
> the same level
of
> weight loss (or perhaps a bit less - I know that weight
> loss slows down
after a
> while), that I'll be down to 205 or 210 by the time we
> leave for the trip
to
> Telluride-Moab. If I make it to that weight I won't feel
> too bad about
being
> able to make the ride in its entirety.
>
> Basically, my regimen consists of watching what I eat, and
> doing a lot of
cardio
> and some minor weight lifting. I'm basically lifting three
> times a week, moderate weights, 3 sets of about 12 reps
> for each exercise. I'm lifting
on
> M-W-F, and am alternating lower and upper body exercises
> every other
session.
> So, the first week I did Monday and Friday upper body, and
> Wednesday lower
body.
> Last week was the opposite - lower body on Monday and
> Friday, with upper
body
> weight training on Wednesday. This way I'm not too sore in
> the areas I'm targeting when I have to hit them again. Oh
> yeah, I'm also doing ab work
with
> every weight session. I'm not trying to look like Arnold
> here, just
hoping I
> can strengthen up some core areas before the trip.
>
> As for cardiovascular training, I spent the first week
> doing a lot of easy spinning on my road bike on the
> rollers. I've got a couple of 45:00
minute
> videos that I watch during this - one is an actual
> training video, the
other is
> just footage of some railroad trains in various parts of
> the country (I'm
kind
> of a railroad buff so watching trains whizz around for 45
> minutes is
actually
> fun for me). The second week I mixed it up a bit, with a
> couple of bike sessions, but a 30 minute rowing session
> (hard) and two 30 minute
stairmaster
> sessions (the kind with the actual stars, on an escalator
> type tread - I
don't
> like the little step master machines because you can cheat
> and short-step
it).
> This week I've begun doing some spinning classes in the
> gym, which are
good
> because we've been doing a lot of interval work, and it's
> hitting me that
my
> conditioning leaves quite a bit to be desired when it
> comes to having to
produce
> power near my lactic threshold. I know from previous
> experience that the spinning classes are good when first
> getting back in shape, but after a
while
> they become a bit stagnant and frankly, too short and too
> easy. So I plan
on
> transitioning over to longer outdoor bike rides in the
> next couple of
weeks, as
> the weather keeps getting better and the days longer. I
> anticiapte that a
lot
> of my training will continue to be indoors, however,
> because I find that
after I
> get home from work, feed and bathe the kid and put him to
> bed, that it's
close
> to 7pm and there's not a lot of light left!
>
> For my "diet," the main thing I did was to give up
> drinking beer. This
probably
> amounted to around 1500 calories a day, as I absolutely
> love the stuff,
and
> easily put away 6-8 of them a night (please, no
> lectures about
alcoholism - I'm
> quite aware that I have a problem). Not the cheap stuff,
> either - usually Sierra Nevada or Sam Adams or something.
> Anyway, I also cut way back on
dairy
> products and processed meats, and am striving to eat a
> salad and some
other
> vegetables every day.
>
> I've got 12 weeks to go until the trip - I think I saw
> someone here post something about a 12-week stationary
> program in the "Smart Cycling" book
(which
> I just happen to have) - perhaps that will dovetail
> nicely with my
schedule.
> Maybe I'll start that program next week; I do have a
> stationary trainer
and also
> a hear rate monitor - that will give me 11 out of the 12
> training weeks.
>
> Thanks for listening - I'll try to post more in a couple
> more weeks when (hopefully) I've lost more weight, gained
> more fitness, and gotten a
little
> closer to my goal.
>
> Fat Red
post #47 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

"Didier A. Depireux" <didier@rai.isr.umd.edu> wrote in message
news:c2khbq$o18$1@grapevine.wam.umd.edu...
> In rec.bicycles.racing Redfoot <no_spam@spam.org> wrote:
>
> > I've got 12 weeks to go until the trip - I think I saw
> > someone here post something about a 12-week stationary
> > program in the "Smart Cycling" book
(which
> > I just happen to have) - perhaps that will dovetail
> > nicely with my
schedule.
>
> Lossing weight quickly can be done!

Yes it can be done quickly, but it takes some major
discipline coupled with lots of riding, 6-7 days per week.

It's all about calories in and calories out.
post #48 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

Redfoot wrote:

> "Redfoot" <no_spam@spam.org> wrote in message news:ILTZb.-
> 15277$hm4.13391@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
>
>>Hi, my brother talked me into signing up for a 7-day /
>>6-night mountain bike ride from Telluride, CO to Moab, UT
>>coming up early June (mostly fire trails). Trouble is
>>that as a parent of a very young child, and also
>>finishing up a graduate degree in EE and working
>>fulltime, I've become grossly overwight and have not
>>train in almost a year. I'm 6'0" tall and 240 pounds,
>>yeah I'm normally heavyset anyweigh (usually around 200
>>even if at fighting weight) but
>
> I
>
>>am scared now because I'm afraid I won't be able to cut it
>>unless I seriously lose some weight and get training.
>>
>>I was wondering if someone could point me to a resource
>>which would not only recommend some good training
>>regimen, but also spellout a good diet for losing some
>>extra weight. Ideally an online "diary" type of thing
>>where I could
>
> input
>
>>my food for the day, it would count calories, and also
>>what I did in the gym
>
> or
>
>>on the road that day. Or does it make sense to hire a
>>personal trainer for this?
>>
>>Sorry if I come across like an idiot - but maybe I am! Is
>>it too much to
>
> expect
>
>>to lose 40 pounds in 3+ months and also get into
>>reasonalbe shape to finish
>
> the
>
>>ride? It's probably 35 miles a day at avg. 8000 t.
>>elevation - I'm not
>
> looking
>
>>to set any records, but I don't want to die of
>>exhaustion either.
>>
>>TIA,
>>
>>Fat Red
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> Hello, and thanks to all who took the time to respond to
> my post. Some good advice and some good support.
>
> I began my regimen two weeks ago today, and weighed in at
> 238.5 at that point. As of yesterday morning, I'm down to
> 234.0, so although that's not too huge of a drop, it *is*
> 4.5 pounds in two weeks, which is probably all I can hope
> for if I want to lose the weight safely. My hope is that
> if I keep the same level of weight loss (or perhaps a bit
> less - I know that weight loss slows down after a while),
> that I'll be down to 205 or 210 by the time we leave for
> the trip to Telluride-Moab. If I make it to that weight I
> won't feel too bad about being able to make the ride in
> its entirety.
>
> Basically, my regimen consists of watching what I eat,
> and doing a lot of cardio and some minor weight lifting.
> I'm basically lifting three times a week, moderate
> weights, 3 sets of about 12 reps for each exercise. I'm
> lifting on M-W-F, and am alternating lower and upper body
> exercises every other session. So, the first week I did
> Monday and Friday upper body, and Wednesday lower body.
> Last week was the opposite - lower body on Monday and
> Friday, with upper body weight training on Wednesday.
> This way I'm not too sore in the areas I'm targeting when
> I have to hit them again. Oh yeah, I'm also doing ab work
> with every weight session. I'm not trying to look like
> Arnold here, just hoping I can strengthen up some core
> areas before the trip.
>
> As for cardiovascular training, I spent the first week
> doing a lot of easy spinning on my road bike on the
> rollers. I've got a couple of 45:00 minute videos that I
> watch during this - one is an actual training video, the
> other is just footage of some railroad trains in various
> parts of the country (I'm kind of a railroad buff so
> watching trains whizz around for 45 minutes is actually
> fun for me). The second week I mixed it up a bit, with a
> couple of bike sessions, but a 30 minute rowing session
> (hard) and two 30 minute stairmaster sessions (the kind
> with the actual stars, on an escalator type tread - I
> don't like the little step master machines because you can
> cheat and short-step it). This week I've begun doing some
> spinning classes in the gym, which are good because we've
> been doing a lot of interval work, and it's hitting me
> that my conditioning leaves quite a bit to be desired when
> it comes to having to produce power near my lactic
> threshold. I know from previous experience that the
> spinning classes are good when first getting back in
> shape, but after a while they become a bit stagnant and
> frankly, too short and too easy. So I plan on
> transitioning over to longer outdoor bike rides in the
> next couple of weeks, as the weather keeps getting better
> and the days longer. I anticiapte that a lot of my
> training will continue to be indoors, however, because I
> find that after I get home from work, feed and bathe the
> kid and put him to bed, that it's close to 7pm and there's
> not a lot of light left!
>
> For my "diet," the main thing I did was to give up
> drinking beer. This probably amounted to around 1500
> calories a day, as I absolutely love the stuff, and easily
> put away 6-8 of them a night (please, no lectures about
> alcoholism - I'm quite aware that I have a problem). Not
> the cheap stuff, either - usually Sierra Nevada or Sam
> Adams or something. Anyway, I also cut way back on dairy
> products and processed meats, and am striving to eat a
> salad and some other vegetables every day.
>
> I've got 12 weeks to go until the trip - I think I saw
> someone here post something about a 12-week stationary
> program in the "Smart Cycling" book (which I just happen
> to have) - perhaps that will dovetail nicely with my
> schedule. Maybe I'll start that program next week; I do
> have a stationary trainer and also a hear rate monitor -
> that will give me 11 out of the 12 training weeks.
>
> Thanks for listening - I'll try to post more in a couple
> more weeks when (hopefully) I've lost more weight, gained
> more fitness, and gotten a little closer to my goal.
>
> Fat Red
>
>
Hey Not-As-Fat-Red keep up the good work. Read up a bit
on over training. It amounts to doing more than your body
can recover from. If you wake up with your heart beating
hard and fast (just as your eyes are opening) and feeling
like a heard of cattle has been walking on you all night,
tone it down a bit. Probably won't happen, but it can,
and it can shoot your program to hell for a week (or
more) as you rest up.

Cheers, Shawn
post #49 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

RE/
>I'm down to 234.0, so although that's not too huge of a
>drop, it *is* 4.5 pounds in two weeks, which is probably
>all I can hope for if I want to lose the weight safely. My
>hope is that if I keep the same level of weight loss (or
>perhaps a bit less - I know that weight loss slows down
>after a while)

Some people advise against stepping on the scales too often
- messes up your mind when those plateaus happen...
--
PeteCresswell
post #50 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

Monique Y. Herman wrote:
> ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.mountain-bike.] On 2004-03-
> 10, (Pete Cresswell) penned:
>>
>> Some people advise against stepping on the scales too
>> often - messes up your mind when those plateaus happen...
>
> Also, scales can be really inaccurate. I'm assuming that
> accurate ones exist, but I've had the following experience
> on my scale at home:
>
> 1) Step on scale.
> 2) Go to the bathroom
> 3) Step on scale, which lists weight as 3 pounds over what
> was listed in step 1.
>
It helps if you step on the same place of the scale each
time. Hanging a heel over the edge will make you read
lighter. I have never encountered a scale as innaccurate as
you claim them to be. Their innaccuracy is usually by a
fixed amount each time, and can be corrected through
calibration once you know your correct weight.
post #51 of 51

Re: dumb fat person post

Monique Y. Herman wrote:
> ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.mountain-bike.] On 2004-03-
> 10, (Pete Cresswell) penned:
>>
>> Some people advise against stepping on the scales too
>> often - messes up your mind when those plateaus happen...
>
> Also, scales can be really inaccurate. I'm assuming that
> accurate ones exist, but I've had the following experience
> on my scale at home:
>
> 1) Step on scale.
> 2) Go to the bathroom
> 3) Step on scale, which lists weight as 3 pounds over what
> was listed in step 1.
>
> Because of this, I don't consider any scale reading to be
> significant unless there's a difference of at least five
> pounds from whatever I thought was my current weight.
>
> (And of course there's the whole weight vs. fat thing, but
> that's been covered already in this thread.)

Are your scales on carpet? I remember reading how carpet can
really throw scales out, I think due to the fact that the
feet of the scales could sink in, allowing the body of the
scales to touch the carpet.
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