Adjusting older campagnolo brakes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dcg, Nov 4, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Dcg

    Dcg Guest

    I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.

    The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    they're not centering.

    Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?

    David Griffith
     
    Tags:


  2. Brad Upton

    Brad Upton Guest

    Clean the place where the return springs make contact with each caliper arm. Clean between the
    spring and the aluminum protrusion from the caliper arms. Then, once clean, lubricate the contact
    point with oil or grease. That should help.

    Once this is clean and lubricated, you might need to loosen the caliper pivot bolt from the rear
    (where it attaches to the fork), then rotate the entire assembly until centered, then tighten the
    pivot bolt. There is usually a wrench flat on an alluminum piece just behind the calipers, where the
    return spring attaches to the center, that can help in rotating the entire assembly to center.
    Although, it can be difficult to get a wrench in there. You'll need a thin wrench, like a cone
    wrench. Park Tools makes wrenches especially for centering brakes.

    It requires some patience, but can be done!

    dcg wrote:

    >I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    >or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.
    >
    >The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    >they're not centering.
    >
    >Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?
    >
    >David Griffith
     
  3. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    There are flats for a cone spanner on the brake body just near where it meets the bike frame. Loosen
    the mounting bolt, centre the brake shoes on the rim, and hold the brake body in position with the
    cone spanner while you tighten the mounting bolt.

    Nick

    > I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    > or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.
    >
    > The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    > they're not centering.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    dcg wrote:

    > I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    > or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.
    >
    > The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    > they're not centering.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?

    Slip a 14mm cone wrench on the centerbolt wrench flat between the spring and the fork.

    Turn to the center, oil the ends of the spring, snap the brake a few times and recheck the
    centering. Ensure the mounting bolt is oiled and tight and you won't have much trouble with
    this again.

    Note to curmudgeons: Yes, this is an theoretically imperfect design but if you adjust the caliper
    tension and oil the spring ends they do not wander in practice.

    Oh, start by ensuring the wheel is exactly centered in the bike! Use your fingers. Commonly riders
    "center" the brake only to find it was OK to begin with and the wheel was off center.

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  5. mumbo-<< The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.

    The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    they're not centering.

    Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center? >><BR><BR>

    13mm cone wrench or 13mm 90 degree brake tool. Flats on the back of the brake close to where it
    attaches to the fork/frame-Turn these flats to center.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    dcg wrote:
    > I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    > or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.

    See the instructions here: http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/sidepull.shtml

    I'm not sure *all* the advice you have been given is correct for your brakes.

    ~PB
     
  7. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    >13mm cone wrench or 13mm 90 degree brake tool. Flats on the back of the brake close to where it
    >attaches to the fork/frame-Turn these flats to center.
    >
    >Peter Chisholm

    Absolutely correct, Peter, but if the infamous "toothed washer" is used you need to break the
    indentations be loosening the brake first before tightening it again. If not the brake will tend to
    return to its old position. Phil Brown
     
  8. On 2003-11-04, dcg <mumbo@jumbo.com> wrote:

    > I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    > or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.
    >
    > The front brake tends to rub on the right hand side of the rim after the brakes are applied. i.e.
    > they're not centering.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?

    Use a 13mm cone wrench on the slots on the pivot bolt to re-center the calipers. Sometimes it helps
    to have a box wrench on the nut fastening the pivot bolt on the back of the fork to help it turn.

    --

    -John (JohnThompson@new.rr.com)
     
  9. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David Griffith writes:

    > I have an older Guerciotti with Campagnolo brakes. I think the brakes are either Chorus, C-Record,
    > or Athena. The front or the mounting bolt is 'pointy'.

    > The front brake tends to rub on the right side of the rim after releasing the brake. i.e. they're
    > not centering.

    > Does anyone know of a procedure for ensuring these old brakes return to center?

    This effect brought us dual pivot brakes that are forcefully centered (and cannot track a bent
    wheel). The brake in question did not change nor did the spring get soft. What happened is that
    friction between the spring and brake arm on one side increased because it got dirtier than one on
    the other side. Usually a drop of oil on both spring contact points on left and right brake arm,
    will re-center the brake. Adjusting the center bolt is only a temporary fix. It will go off center
    again when the other side also gets higher friction.

    After applying oil, momentarily lift the spring out of its groove by holding the brake pad against
    the rim and pulling back on the spring so that the applied oil can get to the where he spring slides
    in its slot. The best approach is to disengage the spring from both arms and clean their slot before
    putting a dab of grease in there.

    Whatever you do, don't take a hammer and punch to pound on the spring as I used to see bike
    mechanics do when we were all riding single pivot brakes. That is destructive. It isn't the shape of
    the spring that causes the problem, but rather loss of lubrication. Nothing else has changed from
    the time the brake was installed and worked properly.

    Jobst Brandt jobst.brandt@stanfordalumni.org
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

Loading...