adjusting vee brakes

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by dave, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. dave

    dave Guest

    Hello. I have a Giant Expression bought new 3 months ago. The rear
    brakes are now totally ineffective. When I first noticed this I
    twisted the cable near the brake lever and this worked for a week or
    so. I've done this a few times but now I can't do this without the
    cable dropping out of the lever. Can I adjust the cable near the brake
    pad? I couldn't see how to do this and the maintenance book I have
    refers to cantilever brakes only :(
    Thaks for any help /dave
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dave wrote:
    > Hello. I have a Giant Expression bought new 3 months ago. The rear
    > brakes are now totally ineffective. When I first noticed this I
    > twisted the cable near the brake lever and this worked for a week or
    > so. I've done this a few times but now I can't do this without the
    > cable dropping out of the lever. Can I adjust the cable near the brake
    > pad?


    Yes. Where the cable joins the brake mechanism there should be a bolt
    you can loosen off. Once it is loose you can pull the cable through and
    retighten it a little further up the cable which should have the desired
    effect.

    Before you do this, screw the adjuster at the lever itself back in all
    the way, so it can be used for the next round of minor adjustment.

    When you're setting the new cable position, hold the brakes at the place
    you want them to be at rest while pulling the cable taught with your
    other hand. Then, with your third hand (!) do up the bolt.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Doki

    Doki Guest

    dave wrote:
    > Hello. I have a Giant Expression bought new 3 months ago. The rear
    > brakes are now totally ineffective. When I first noticed this I
    > twisted the cable near the brake lever and this worked for a week or
    > so. I've done this a few times but now I can't do this without the
    > cable dropping out of the lever. Can I adjust the cable near the brake
    > pad? I couldn't see how to do this and the maintenance book I have
    > refers to cantilever brakes only :(
    > Thaks for any help /dave


    Are they rubbing or do you just use them a lot? Rear brakes shouldn't wear
    so quickly that they don't touch the rim hard enough to stop you - I've gone
    from a new set of shimano pads to worn out in a couple of weeks, and
    obviously the amount you have to pull the levers has altered but they still
    work right. I suspect there's more adjustment to be done than just cable
    length - are the pads centred around the rim properly?
     
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 25/11/04 12:25 pm, in article co4iv3$sqq$1@dux.dundee.ac.uk, "Peter
    Clinch" <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> wrote:


    > When you're setting the new cable position, hold the brakes at the place
    > you want them to be at rest while pulling the cable taught with your
    > other hand. Then, with your third hand (!) do up the bolt.


    I should point out that you use the third hand to hold the brakes, and the
    first and second hands to pull the cable and tighten the bolt.

    Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.

    ...d
     
  5. Richard

    Richard Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    >>When you're setting the new cable position, hold the brakes at the place
    >>you want them to be at rest while pulling the cable taught with your
    >>other hand. Then, with your third hand (!) do up the bolt.

    >
    >
    > I should point out that you use the third hand to hold the brakes, and the
    > first and second hands to pull the cable and tighten the bolt.
    >
    > Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.


    Or use an old toe strap I keep for this specific porpoise. :)

    R.
     
  6. David Brown

    David Brown Guest

    He could have a gear cable instead of a brake cable and therefore stretching
    ludicrously.

    --
    kitemap
    http://ugcc.co.uk
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David Brown wrote:
    > He could have a gear cable instead of a brake cable and therefore stretching
    > ludicrously.


    They're both steel and shouldn't stretch appreciably in any case. Or so
    I thought.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Peter Clinch <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> wrote in message news:<co4v6g$8h2$2@dux.dundee.ac.uk>...
    > David Brown wrote:
    > > He could have a gear cable instead of a brake cable and therefore stretching
    > > ludicrously.

    >
    > They're both steel and shouldn't stretch appreciably in any case. Or so
    > I thought.
    >


    And the end of a gear cable is noticeably different to that of a brake
    cable (regardless of whether flat or drop bars are used) - quite hard
    to get them mixed up.

    David E. Belcher
     
  9. Richard <richard@nomail.nospam.thanks> wrote in message news:<co4orf$fn7$1@hermes.shef.ac.uk>...
    > David Martin wrote:
    >
    > >>When you're setting the new cable position, hold the brakes at the place
    > >>you want them to be at rest while pulling the cable taught with your
    > >>other hand. Then, with your third hand (!) do up the bolt.

    > >
    > >
    > > I should point out that you use the third hand to hold the brakes, and the
    > > first and second hands to pull the cable and tighten the bolt.
    > >
    > > Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.

    >
    > Or use an old toe strap I keep for this specific porpoise. :)
    >


    Excellent tip, Richard - I'll certainly bear that one in mind (must be
    an old toe-strap somewhere down the shed at home). As it is, whilst
    setting up the cross bike last weekend, I was able to call on the
    services of Dad as an extra pair of hands during the fiddly business
    of tensioning the cantilevers!

    David E. Belcher
     
  10. half_pint

    half_pint Guest

    "David Martin" <d.m.a.martin@dundee.ac.uk> wrote in message
    news:BDCB96C8.39BA%d.m.a.martin@dundee.ac.uk...
    > On 25/11/04 12:25 pm, in article co4iv3$sqq$1@dux.dundee.ac.uk, "Peter
    > Clinch" <p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > When you're setting the new cable position, hold the brakes at the place
    > > you want them to be at rest while pulling the cable taught with your
    > > other hand. Then, with your third hand (!) do up the bolt.

    >
    > I should point out that you use the third hand to hold the brakes, and the
    > first and second hands to pull the cable and tighten the bolt.
    >
    > Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.


    A piece of string you mean?

    Save a pound and use a shoelace.


    >
    > ..d
    >
     
  11. MSeries

    MSeries Guest

    half_pint wrote:

    >>Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.

    >
    >
    > A piece of string you mean?
    >
    > Save a pound and use a shoelace.
    >


    A third hand tool is far easier to use than a toestrap or piece of string.
     
  12. dave

    dave Guest

    Huge thanks for that advice!!! I'll have a go at the weekend and
    report back as to how it went. /dave
     
  13. half_pint

    half_pint Guest

    "MSeries" <skankmartin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:30n5frF32b9beU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > half_pint wrote:
    >
    > >>Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.

    > >
    > >
    > > A piece of string you mean?
    > >
    > > Save a pound and use a shoelace.
    > >

    >
    > A third hand tool is far easier to use than a toestrap or piece of string.


    But not always available.
     
  14. m-gineering

    m-gineering Guest

    half_pint wrote:
    >
    > "MSeries" <skankmartin@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:30n5frF32b9beU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > > half_pint wrote:
    > >
    > > >>Yes there is a 'third hand tool' you can buy new for this purpose.
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > A piece of string you mean?
    > > >
    > > > Save a pound and use a shoelace.
    > > >

    > >
    > > A third hand tool is far easier to use than a toestrap or piece of string.

    >
    > But not always available.



    An awfull lot of work when two hands are all you need! Screw out the
    adjuster a couple of times, loosen the cableclamp so that the cable will
    just slide, close brake with left hand and pull the cable taut, slide
    thumb up against cable so it won't slip back, tighten bolt. Back of
    adjuster
    --
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  15. On Sat, 27 Nov 2004 02:56:54 -0000, "half_pint"
    <info@uk.millwardbrown.com> wrote in message
    <30q8m2F32dfhiU1@uni-berlin.de>:

    >> A third hand tool is far easier to use than a toestrap or piece of string.

    >But not always available.


    You might even have to resort to buying a new one...

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
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