campy + shimano interchangability ??!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Adam-from-SLO, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. Adam-from-SLO

    Adam-from-SLO New Member

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    Can someone please tell me if it is possible to use a Shimano rear-hub/ cassette/ and chain set up(all hyperglide 9-speed.. Ultegra quality) , with Campagnolo 9-speed shifters/deraileurs/ crankset ?

    Just inquiring because I've always liked Shimano's "upshifts" to an easier gear (sometimes Campy can get crappy in that dept. and Campy tends to be a little more finicky in terms of adjusting/tuning in the shifting response), the hyperglide is a sweet set up in those regards; however I dislike Shimano in regards to just about every other aspect, ergonomics and downshifts(there seems to be a lag of about 1/2 a crank spin), but I think this is due to the rear-deraileur/chain movement.

    Please advise,
    -A:D
    PS.. I do prefer to use 100% of a given manufacture of components, and not mix. That is how the manufactures engineer their equipment; however I'm trying to get the best of both worlds here ... yet not wanting to sacrifice anything in terms of long term durability, etc.
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Without trying the particular combination (I guess if I'm motivated I can try it this weekend, but don't count on it), I'm going to say that you can use the 9-speed Shimano wheel with your 9-speed Campagnolo shifters & derailleur BUT you will lose the use of one of the intermediate cogs (I think, the 6th largest) as the chain simply bypasses it.

    Regardless, to state what should hopefully be obvious -- you'll need to adjust the hi-lo stops, first ... then set the indexing between the first & second cog ...

    I guess how it works depends whether you have a pre-2001 9-speed or post-2001 9-speed rear derailleur -- supposedly, there is a difference.

    BTW. The 10-speed Campagnolo shifter is even more compatible with the 9-speed Shimano cassettes.
     
  3. Adam-from-SLO

    Adam-from-SLO New Member

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    I have all pre-2001 shifters/derailiers, etc.

    If I were to get a 10-speed right lever, would I then gain back that one missed cog ? Would I have to get that lever plus a post 2001 RD ? I've seen some post 2001 RD on ebay fairly cheap (Centuar mainly).

    Thanks in advance.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    First, I actually don't think that there is a difference in the geometry of the pre-2001 & post-2001 Campagnolo rear derailleurs ...

    It was my impression (which could obviously be wrong) that the pre-2001 9-speed rear derailleur LOOKED like the 8-speed, but the location of the derailleur anchor was closer to the forward "knuckle" of the parallelogram on the 9-speed variant. The subsequently re-designed, post-2001 rear derailleurs are lighter, so a post-2001 Mirage/Veloce/Centaur rear derailleur will probably be lighter than a pre-2001 Chorus rear derailleur which was a boat anchor & may be lighter than a Record rear derailleur.

    The circa 2000, 9-speed Chorus rear derailleur that I had which seemed to index just fine to a 10-speed Campagnolo cassette.

    I've sold all of my Campagnolo rear derailleurs and have been using Shimano derailleurs; so, there are some things about the rear derailleur interchangeability that I can no longer test/confirm first hand; and, my memory seems to be poorer than it used to be ...

    It SEEMED as though the 8-speed Campagnolo rear derailleur was interchangeable with the 8-speed Shimano rear derailleur ... there are some tests I can do with what I still have (i.e., 8-speed Campagnolo shifter + 8-speed cassette + Shimano rear derailleurs) to see if that was actually true.

    Like the Shimano rear derailleurs, 9-speed Campagnolo rear derailleurs were actually capable of allowing the derailleur cable to be anchored up at 9 o'clock to change the geometry to presumably make it compatible with an otherwise 8-speed Campagnolo drivetrain ... using the hubbub.com/non-authorized, alternate anchoring at 3 o'clock allows a 10-speed Campagnolo shifter to index to a 9-speed Shimano cassette when using a Shimano 8-/9-speed rear derailleur.

    Projecting forward & skipping a lot of verbiage (believe-it-or-not), it suggested to me that the 10-speed Shimano rear derailleur could be subsituted for a 9-/10-speed Campagnolo rear derailleur rather than using the hubbub.com alternate rear derailleur anchor position that I had been using. AND, in fact, on one of my bikes, I currently have a 10-speed Shimano rear derailleur + 9-speed Shimano cassette + 10-speed Campagnolo shifters (see attachement) -- the shifting is perfect.

    Regardless, I think the odds are that you won't miss the intermediate cog ... I didn't ... heck, at first, I didn't even know that I wasn't getting all 9 cogs when I was using a 9-speed Campagnolo shifter + 9-speed Shimano cassette + 9-speed Shimano rear derailleur (essentially, an 8-speed Campagnolo rear derailleur) because (as you have observed) the shifting is so smooth with a Shimano cassette.

    So, unless your shifter needs a re-build OR you have some other reason, then I wouldn't fret over it, at least, initially.

    Having said all of THAT, if you use a 105-or-LX cassette then you can cut shims to correct the cog spacing. Supposedly, an aluminum soda/beer is just the right thickness (0.2mm?).
    Cut the top & bottom off a soda can, cut a vertical slit in the tube that you created, flatten, use a SHARPIE to trace the spacers onto the inside of the can, cut out with sharp scissors. Rub the edges of the shims you cut with some emery cloth to reduce the 'cutting' edges & to make the shims easier to handle.
    Wheels Manufacturing made spacers (again, this presumes you are using a 105-or-LX cassette). I had a set AND what I observed was that the spacers SEEMED to be exactly the same thickness as an 8-speed SHIMANO cog spacer!?! So, if you have an 8-speed LX-or-105 Shimano cassette that you can cannibalize, then you should be good-to-go.
     
  5. toomanybikes

    toomanybikes New Member

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    The fact that you want to use 9 speed complicates this slightly - there is one way to do this flawlessly.

    This is the exact same set up I have on my "event day" bike, my De Rosa Primato.

    Campag 9 speed shifters and derailleurs with Shimano hubs and cassettes.

    I am using a Wipperman chain, the chain doesn't matter in the equation.

    You need to get a Jtek Shiftmate, this is a little piece that fits right into the rear derailleur and equalizes the cable pull to Shimano spacing even though the cable is being pulled by Campag shifters.

    Go to Jtek Engineering Shiftmate and figure out which model you need. Then contact them about getting the piece.

    There may be some difficulty at the moment but keep at it, it is worth it.

    The founder of Jtek has become quite ill, he announced he was shutting the business down and then a couple of months later hs son stepped up and said he would take it over to keep it going. I believe they are still transitioning and so supply may be spotty.

    The Jtek is one of those things that just makes life so much easier for cyclists.
     
  6. Peter@vecchios

    Peter@vecchios New Member

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    Short answer is yes, Campagnolo 9s ERGO/rear derailleur will shift a shimano 9s cogset well. Use a shimano chain for best results. And yes, Campagnolo 10s ERGO will also shift well using a shimano 9s cogset and chain. The spacing are on either side of shimano 9s spacing, but similar differences.

    Don't worry about pre and post 2001 Campagnolo stuff, it really doesn't matter.
     
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