Carb Counting & Package Labels

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by em, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. em

    em Guest

    What is the deal when a package is labeled as having 1g of carbs, 2g, etc?
    Does 1g mean >= 1 and <1.5? Or does it mean >= 1 and <2? I'm thinking that
    foods marked 0g and <1g can be less of a problem than foods marked
    1g/serving. Maybe that 1g actually goes up to 1.9, meaning that 3 servings
    of such-and-such, at 1g/serving, could be much closer to 6g than 3. Anybody
    have any insight on this? Thanks! -- Mike
     
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  2. Jackie Patti

    Jackie Patti Guest

    em wrote:
    > What is the deal when a package is labeled as having 1g of carbs, 2g, etc?
    > Does 1g mean >= 1 and <1.5? Or does it mean >= 1 and <2? I'm thinking that
    > foods marked 0g and <1g can be less of a problem than foods marked
    > 1g/serving. Maybe that 1g actually goes up to 1.9, meaning that 3 servings
    > of such-and-such, at 1g/serving, could be much closer to 6g than 3. Anybody
    > have any insight on this? Thanks! -- Mike


    They aren't allowed to round 1.9 to 1. If it says 1, at most, it's
    actually 1.5.

    --
    http://www.ornery-geeks.org/consulting/
     
  3. "em" <i...@dun.no> wrote:
    >
    > What is the deal when a package is labeled as having 1g of carbs, 2g, etc?
    > Does 1g mean >= 1 and <1.5? Or does it mean >= 1 and <2? I'm thinking that
    > foods marked 0g and <1g can be less of a problem than foods marked
    > 1g/serving. Maybe that 1g actually goes up to 1.9, meaning that 3 servings
    > of such-and-such, at 1g/serving, could be much closer to 6g than 3. Anybody
    > have any insight on this?


    In the US labels follow the standard rounding rules taught to
    kids in elementary school. At or above .5 round up, below .5
    round down. As a result if there's even the slightest reason to
    believe an item has carbs (so few edible substances lack carbs
    that the almost means anything but land meat and clear oil)
    then any item whose label says zero should be counted as 0.5.

    A bigger problem is the careful choice of serving size to be
    able to use that rounding feature. US heavy cream is 6 grams
    per cup which is under 0.5 per tablespoon. Thus the serving
    size of a tablespoon is selected and the labal says zero so
    there's a steady stream of new folks tricked into thinking cream
    is completely carb free ...

    On the other hand, how exact do you need to be? When
    tracking to stay in ketosis counting servings of veggies works
    just fine if you don't eat anything that has fancy claims on
    the label. if your count for the day could be off by 10, how much
    sense does it make to count to the nearest 0.1? I think this
    cliche applies - "Measure with a micrometer. Mark with chaulk.
    Cut with an axe." Without getting upset by the process, count
    the best you can to the accuracy you can but understand that
    the error in your count is going to be higher than the digits in
    your final number suggest.
     
  4. "em" <i@dun.no> writes:

    > What is the deal when a package is labeled as having 1g of carbs, 2g,
    > etc? Does 1g mean >= 1 and <1.5? Or does it mean >= 1 and <2? I'm
    > thinking that foods marked 0g and <1g can be less of a problem than
    > foods marked 1g/serving. Maybe that 1g actually goes up to 1.9,
    > meaning that 3 servings of such-and-such, at 1g/serving, could be much
    > closer to 6g than 3. Anybody have any insight on this? Thanks! -- Mike


    ..5 <= "1g" < 1.5

    In other words, "1g" means greater than or equal to .5, and less than
    1.5. Normal rounding.

    However, labels are allowed up to 10% error, so that really makes the
    range from .45 to 1.65. Not a big deal when you're dealing with small
    numbers, but like you say, the difference can add up when you're eating
    several servings of something.

    And that's if everything's correctly labeled. I've seen Consumer
    Reports tests that showed things like canned soup having 2-3 times the
    sodium they claimed. Not that CR is the ultimate arbiter of correctness
    or anything, but food labeling definitely isn't perfect. Take it all
    with a grain of salt, and maybe check brands against each other or
    against generic charts if one claims a suspiciously low number of carbs.



    --
    Aaron -- 285/254/200 -- aaron.baugher.biz
     
  5. This is why I cook most of my food from scratch.
     
  6. Pat

    Pat Guest

    <wifezilla@gmail.com> wrote > This is why I cook most of my food from
    scratch.

    How many carbs in scratch?
    >
     

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