CO2 Systems

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by J Jones, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. J Jones

    J Jones Guest

    So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless CO2
    cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2 out the side
    of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing right in my hand. Must
    have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like the CO2 concept, but so far
    have not been successful using it, and my confidence in the CO2 systems is
    pretty much nil at this point.

    Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about using
    CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the pump 'nipple',
    I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to the top bar, which is
    pretty clunky (imo).

    Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    Jeff
     
    Tags:


  2. "J Jones" <nfw@spammers.net> wrote in message
    news:mLJRf.13893$96.1941@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    > So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed.

    ....
    > Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    > Jeff

    I have used the Silca CO2 system for about five years and it is awesome. I
    have never had anything but perfect expierene using it and the ability to
    actually regulate the flow of gas to achieve the proper pressure is very
    nice indeed. Here in Indiana I only flat about every 2000-3000 miles so CO2
    is a perfect choice.

    Dave
    Noblesville, Indiana
     
  3. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    J Jones wrote:
    > So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    > recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless
    > CO2 cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2
    > out the side of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing
    > right in my hand. Must have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like
    > the CO2 concept, but so far have not been successful using it, and my
    > confidence in the CO2 systems is pretty much nil at this point.
    >
    > Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about
    > using CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the
    > pump 'nipple', I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to
    > the top bar, which is pretty clunky (imo).
    >
    > Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    > Jeff


    Got a chuckle from your PSsssssssssssssssstttttttttt experience. Most if
    not all of us have been there and done that.

    I got a cheap little Performance "Hurricane" frame pump (skinny design),
    which came with a water-bottle-cage mount (they all do, for that matter).
    Click it in and forget it.

    (I still have CO2 -- the kind with a hard-plastic cylinder and a screw-on
    top trigger dealie -- but hardly ever carry it any more. Maybe on "epic"
    rides...but always with the pump for insurance.)

    Key to any CO2 device is to PRACTICE before you need it, as they're all
    kinda tricky IME.

    Bill "air's cheaper and (ultimately) easier" S.
     
  4. "J Jones" <nfw@spammers.net> wrote in message
    news:mLJRf.13893$96.1941@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    > So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    > recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless CO2
    > cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2 out the
    > side of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing right in my
    > hand. Must have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like the CO2 concept,
    > but so far have not been successful using it, and my confidence in the CO2
    > systems is pretty much nil at this point.
    >
    > Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about using
    > CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the pump
    > 'nipple', I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to the top bar,
    > which is pretty clunky (imo).
    >
    > Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    > Jeff
    >
    >


    I had problems with the Innovations Second Wind with semi aero rims and
    short stems. There just wasn't enough stem exposed to get a good grip. Now
    I get the tubes with the longer stems and have no problems. BTW... a
    threaded cartridge would solve your problem, but they are expensive. I buy
    the box of threadless cartridges from Walmart in the paintball section. They
    work just fine, but I have to put some paper in the bottom of the holder to
    make sure it punctures cleanly with no leaking.

    HTH
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 01:47:38 GMT, "Sorni" <sornidelicates@san.rr.com>
    wrote:

    >Bill "air's cheaper and (ultimately) easier" S.


    Air's not only cheaper, but much more widely available.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 20:27:00 -0700, "Bestest Handsander"
    <bestesthandsander@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >"J Jones" <nfw@spammers.net> wrote in message
    >news:mLJRf.13893$96.1941@bignews8.bellsouth.net...
    >> So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    >> recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless CO2
    >> cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2 out the
    >> side of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing right in my
    >> hand. Must have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like the CO2 concept,
    >> but so far have not been successful using it, and my confidence in the CO2
    >> systems is pretty much nil at this point.
    >>
    >> Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about using
    >> CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the pump
    >> 'nipple', I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to the top bar,
    >> which is pretty clunky (imo).
    >>
    >> Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    >> Jeff
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I had problems with the Innovations Second Wind with semi aero rims and
    >short stems. There just wasn't enough stem exposed to get a good grip. Now
    >I get the tubes with the longer stems and have no problems. BTW... a
    >threaded cartridge would solve your problem, but they are expensive. I buy
    >the box of threadless cartridges from Walmart in the paintball section. They
    >work just fine, but I have to put some paper in the bottom of the holder to
    >make sure it punctures cleanly with no leaking.
    >
    >HTH
    >


    Hi, I use CO2 with no problems. I did encounter a problem on a friends
    bike, with a too short stem. I solved it, by screwing on a presta to
    schrader adapter, and then using the CO2 pump.

    I carry an Innovations Ultraflate in both bikes underseat bag. I
    usually carry 3-4 cartridges, so I'm always covered.

    I buy my cartridges by the box, at our local Fleet Farm. They are a
    lot cheaper than the ones sold at your LBS or online, for bicycle pump
    use.


    Life is Good!
    Jeff
     
  7. J Jones wrote:
    > So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    > recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless
    > CO2 cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2
    > out the side of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing
    > right in my hand. Must have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like
    > the CO2 concept, but so far have not been successful using it, and my
    > confidence in the CO2 systems is pretty much nil at this point.


    Me, too.

    > Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about
    > using CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the
    > pump 'nipple', I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to
    > the top bar, which is pretty clunky (imo).


    Nipple-less designs such as the ones at
    http://www.blackburndesign.com/road_pumps.html
    allow the use of frame pumps on traditional to conservatively compact
    frames.

    > Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?


    Topeak Road Morph. I'm small, weak, and fragile. Therefore, I like a mini
    floor pump that's easy to deal with.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  8. me

    me Guest

    " >> Also, what are the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps?
    >
    > Topeak Road Morph. I'm small, weak, and fragile. Therefore, I like a
    > mini floor pump that's easy to deal with.
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training


    I second that opinion - Topeak Road Morph for me. I wouldn't be surprised
    to find that there isn't much difference between the weight of such a light
    pump and a CO2 inflator with a few cartridges.

    It's in my small backpack, along with a couple of spare tubes, patch kit,
    one folding tire, cell phone, a few critical tools, wallet, small container
    of sunscreen, a couple of energy snacks, and my pistol. (The latter is for
    really big dogs and the idiot who runs me over with his/her SUV/monster
    truck and fails to maim me to the extent that I can't use it.) How am I
    going to get all that in my jersey pockets or in one of those under-the-seat
    micro bags? Sheesh - I don't know how anyone can go on long rides with as
    little to support themselves as many do.

    Cal
     
  9. On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 20:06:39 -0500, J Jones wrote:

    > Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about using
    > CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the pump 'nipple',
    > I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to the top bar, which is
    > pretty clunky (imo).


    Amusing. I got into this _before_ many frames had a braze-on pump peg.
    My current road bike actually has one, but I don't use it.

    > Also, what are

    the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps? Jeff

    Topeak Road Morph is by far the best pump I have ever seen. I use it all
    the time to pump up the tires of other folks on the ride who have flats.
    I ask them how much pressure they want, and they say something like
    "110psi, if you can manage it" -- but that is absolutely no problem for
    this pump. 130psi+ would take some serious work, but IMO that's pretty
    over the top, anyway. Most mini pumps cannot manage more than 80psi.

    CO2 can manage higher pressures only if you use more than one cartridge.
    Use the old one from the previous flat to start inflation and get some
    volume in there, then break out a new one to get some real pressure. As
    far as brands, I have no idea what I have, but be _sure_ to get the kind
    that can use the cheap threadless cartridges. Spending $2+ per cartridge
    for threaded, versus $0.25 for threaded, is a no-brainer. My holder
    actually encloses the cartridge, presses onto a presta valve (threads onto
    a Shraeder valve), and can hold a partially-used cartridge in the seat
    bag, with some pressure left, as long as the trigger isn't pressed by
    stuff in the bag.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It is a scientifically proven fact that a mid life crisis can
    _`\(,_ | only be cured by something racy and Italian. Bianchis and
    (_)/ (_) | Colnagos are a lot cheaper than Maserattis and Ferraris. --
    Glenn Davies
     
  10. David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 20:06:39 -0500, J Jones wrote:
    >
    >> Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about
    >> using CO2 vs. carrying a pump. Since frames no longer include the
    >> pump 'nipple', I'd have to use velcro straps to attach the pump to
    >> the top bar, which is pretty clunky (imo).

    >
    > Amusing. I got into this _before_ many frames had a braze-on pump
    > peg. My current road bike actually has one, but I don't use it.
    >
    >> Also, what are

    > the preferred brands of CO2 systems and/or pumps? Jeff
    >
    > Topeak Road Morph is by far the best pump I have ever seen. I use it
    > all the time to pump up the tires of other folks on the ride who have
    > flats. I ask them how much pressure they want, and they say something
    > like "110psi, if you can manage it" -- but that is absolutely no
    > problem for this pump. 130psi+ would take some serious work, but IMO
    > that's pretty over the top, anyway. Most mini pumps cannot manage
    > more than 80psi.
    >
    > CO2 can manage higher pressures only if you use more than one
    > cartridge. Use the old one from the previous flat to start inflation
    > and get some volume in there, then break out a new one to get some
    > real pressure. As far as brands, I have no idea what I have, but be
    > _sure_ to get the kind that can use the cheap threadless cartridges.
    > Spending $2+ per cartridge for threaded, versus $0.25 for threaded,


    Twenty-five cents for threadless, you mean?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  11. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    J Jones wrote:
    > So far, I'm 0-for-2 on the CO2 system actually working when needed. Most
    > recently, I screwed the unit together to puncture the threadless CO2
    > cartridge, and the puncture was just enough to release all CO2 out the side
    > of the unit and ultimately disintegrated the housing right in my hand. Must
    > have been quite a POS unit, I agree. I like the CO2 concept, but so far
    > have not been successful using it, and my confidence in the CO2 systems is
    > pretty much nil at this point.


    I carry the Innovations MicroFlate which uses threaded cartridges. The
    tool itself is very small, only weighs 38g, and costs $10 including one
    16g cartridge, which will inflate a road tire to 120 psi in seconds.
    You can regulate the flow of gas, and only partially use a cartridge,
    if desired. Yes, the threaded cartridges cost $2 each, but I don't get
    many flats, and the speed and convenience is worth it to me when I'm
    stuck by the side of the road.
     
  12. " __o | It is a scientifically proven fact that a mid life crisis
    can
    _`\(,_ | only be cured by something racy and Italian. Bianchis and
    (_)/ (_) | Colnagos are a lot cheaper than Maserattis and Ferraris. --
    Glenn Davies "


    Scene: Autumn, tiny county road, a long time ago. Cyclist is passed by
    retired couple on BMW motorcycle and wearing mics.

    BMW-ist: "Nice bike there sonny."

    Colnag-ist: "Thanks. More expensive than yours."

    Bmw-ist (laughs): "Not more than this."

    Colnag-ist: "I meant pound-for-pound."

    Bmw cracks throttle a bit and flys away, with barely a sound.
    Colnag-ist finishes his banana while listening to the blackbirds...
     
  13. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:
    > On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 01:47:38 GMT, "Sorni" <sornidelicates@san.rr.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Bill "air's cheaper and (ultimately) easier" S.

    >
    >
    > Air's not only cheaper, but much more widely available.


    Speak for yourself, earthling! CO2 is much easier to come by around
    here. Behave yourself or I will be forced to disintegrate you!

    Marvin the Martian
     
  14. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Mark Janeba wrote:
    > Werehatrack wrote:
    >> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 01:47:38 GMT, "Sorni" <sornidelicates@san.rr.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Bill "air's cheaper and (ultimately) easier" S.

    >>
    >>
    >> Air's not only cheaper, but much more widely available.

    >
    > Speak for yourself, earthling! CO2 is much easier to come by around
    > here. Behave yourself or I will be forced to disintegrate you!
    >
    > Marvin the Martian


    What kind of pressures are you running up there?

    Bill "it's read, so plan it?" S.
     
  15. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 08:10:59 -0800, Mark-vin the Mark-tian Janeba
    <mandPLEASEmlj@comDONTcastSPAM.net> wrote:

    >Werehatrack wrote:
    >> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 01:47:38 GMT, "Sorni" <sornidelicates@san.rr.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Bill "air's cheaper and (ultimately) easier" S.

    >>
    >>
    >> Air's not only cheaper, but much more widely available.

    >
    >Speak for yourself, earthling! CO2 is much easier to come by around
    >here. Behave yourself or I will be forced to disintegrate you!


    Your air *is* mostly CO2, just like the air in Congress.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  16. POHB

    POHB Guest

    CO2 is too heavy, I only use hydrogen :p
     
  17. On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 03:00:52 -0500, Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    >> Spending $2+ per cartridge for threaded, versus $0.25 for threaded,

    >
    > Twenty-five cents for threadless, you mean?


    yeah.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | When you are up to your ass in alligators, it's hard to remember
    _`\(,_ | that your initial objective was to drain the swamp. -- LBJ
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  18. On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 17:12:51 +0000, Werehatrack wrote:

    > Your air *is* mostly CO2, just like the air in Congress.


    I would have thought that was mostly methane.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  19. Quoting J Jones <nfw@spammers.net>:
    >Just wanted to check the group to get opinions (good and bad) about using
    >CO2 vs. carrying a pump.


    The correct technique for using a CO2 inflator is to stand at the side of
    the road looking pathetic after it lets you down; within 5 minutes someone
    with a Zefal HPX will drop by, mock you gently, and inflate your tyre. :)

    Seriously; my HPX and I have helped out plenty of CO2 users.
    --
    David Damerell <damerell@chiark.greenend.org.uk> Distortion Field!
    Today is First Leicesterday, March.
     
  20. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    <rloef@interfold.com> wrote: Scene: Autumn, tiny county road, a long time
    ago. Cyclist is passed by
    > retired couple on BMW motorcycle and wearing mics.
    >
    > BMW-ist: "Nice bike there sonny."
    >
    > Colnag-ist: "Thanks. More expensive than yours."
    >
    > Bmw-ist (laughs): "Not more than this."
    >
    > Colnag-ist: "I meant pound-for-pound."
    >
    > Bmw cracks throttle a bit and flys away, with barely a sound.
    > Colnag-ist finishes his banana while listening to the blackbirds...

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    Too many paragraphs for hai-ku, but just as touching.
    >
     
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