compact geometry hell

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Callistus Valer, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Robert Brown" <rxobert.bxrown@txripnet.se> wrote in message
    news:4050D984.B96E888A@txripnet.se...
    > Evan Evans wrote:
    >
    > > Derk <I_hatespam@invalid.org> wrote in message
    news:<40502bf6$0$566$e4fe514c@news.xs4all.nl>...
    > > > Matt O'Toole wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > The Colnago would be a bit flashy for me,
    > > > That's an understatement: the guy who designs the
    > > > paintwork seems to
    be
    > > > colour blind to me.
    > > >
    > > > Greets, Derk
    > >
    > > What is up with colnago's paint colors? I would love to
    > > own one. I'm sure thay ride wonderfully , but whoever
    > > came up with the idea to put eye-balls on every tube
    > > lost me as a customer.
    >
    > Would you be happier if you could see them eyes as little
    > suns with
    asteroid belts orbiting them?
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    > Try to get hold of a 2002 model. I think mine's called
    > D23N. Not an
    eyeball to be seen, just nice
    > little rainbows. Or try this year's Classic in D11N
    > scheme, or this year's
    Mix in PR23 scheme (if
    > you want the eyeballs/planets to be replaced by some cute
    > little wavy
    Estonian flags . . .).
    >
    > Or just respray the damn thing Bianchi green.
    >
    > /Robert

    Nah, Italian Racing Red is THE color!

    Sure beats that wimpy British Racing Green... mmmm Jag E-
    Type, Triumph TR6, my little Midget, mmmm...

    OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the MG
    Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in. So
    maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so simple,
    they even forgot to get the electrics right in most! Mine
    ran like a top, but the electrics were "interesting" to say
    the least. If I hadn't t-boned a Beretta in it, I was going
    to rip out the wiring harness and re-do it.

    Mike
     


  2. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Mike S. wrote:

    > ... Sure beats that wimpy British Racing Green... mmmm Jag
    > E-Type, Triumph TR6, my little Midget, mmmm...
    >
    > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the MG
    > Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in. So
    > maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so simple,
    > they even forgot to get the electrics right in most! Mine
    > ran like a top, but the electrics were "interesting" to
    > say the least. If I hadn't t-boned a Beretta in it, I was
    > going to rip out the wiring harness and re-do it.

    I still have a MG Midget (I think). It last ran in 1989,
    when I gave up on it as being the most unreliable piece of
    machinery ever invented. While it was fun to drive, it was
    not fun sitting on the side of the road waiting for a tow-
    truck. Practically everthing electrical and mechnical on it
    had problems.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)
     
  3. Ted Bennett

    Ted Bennett Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:

    > > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the MG
    > > Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in. So
    > > maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so
    > > simple, they even forgot to get the electrics right in
    > > most! Mine ran like a top, but the electrics were
    > > "interesting" to say the least.
    >
    > They say that the reason British people prefer warm beer
    > is that they all have Lucas refrigerators.

    Lucas, the Prince of Darkness.

    The way they maintained their uniformly abysmal quality was
    to pack their products in brine and send them by the slowest
    boat available.

    --
    Ted Bennett Portland OR
     
  4. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    Mike S. wrote:
    > "S o r n i" <sorni@bite-me.san.rr.com> wrote in message
    > news:eek:q34c.24356$4o3.16631@twister.socal.rr.com...
    >> Mike S. wrote:
    >>>
    >>> When was the last time you saw a Manitou mtn bike. Even
    >>> better, when was the last time you saw a mtn bike WITH
    >>> NO SHOCK? (being ridden off-road that is)
    >>
    >> Umm, like, Saturday. (No derailleurs, either.)
    >>
    >> Bill "lots of rigid mtb's out there (not mine, mind you
    >> -- gimme gears 'n squish)" S.
    >>
    > SS mtn bikes are a different critter than what the pic
    > was. Those SS guys are PROUD to be retro "ouch that rock
    > HURT!" kinda guys.

    True, but you asked "when was the last time you saw a mtn
    bike WITH NO SHOCK?"

    I see fully rigid mtb's all the time (both SS and geared).

    Bill "the gearies are usually entry-level; SS's usually
    higher grade" S.
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Ted Bennett wrote:

    > "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:

    >> They say that the reason British people prefer warm beer
    >> is that they all have Lucas refrigerators.

    > The way they maintained their uniformly abysmal quality
    > was to pack their products in brine and send them by the
    > slowest boat available.

    ...and then they sealed the brine in with Waxoyl...

    Matt O.
     
  6. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    Ted Bennett <tedbennett@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:<tedbennett-6E3179.22075011032004@news1.west.earthlink.net>...
    > "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:
    >
    > > > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the
    > > > MG Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in.
    > > > So maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so
    > > > simple, they even forgot to get the electrics right in
    > > > most! Mine ran like a top, but the electrics were
    > > > "interesting" to say the least.
    > >
    > > They say that the reason British people prefer warm beer
    > > is that they all have Lucas refrigerators.
    >
    >
    > Lucas, the Prince of Darkness.
    >
    > The way they maintained their uniformly abysmal quality
    > was to pack their products in brine and send them by the
    > slowest boat available.

    Dear David,

    If motorcycles were wide enough for bumper stickers, these
    are some of the things that we wanted to put on fenders
    attached to Lucas-powered lights, ignitions, and horns
    thirty years ago:

    Joe Lucas--Prince of Darkness! Joe Lucas says, "Don't ride
    in the dark!" Joe Lucas says, "That IS the high beam!"

    Joe Lucas says, "Kick it again--it might wake up!" Joe
    Lucas says, "Not slippery when wet--immobile!" Joe Lucas
    says, "Don't ride when it's wet!"

    Joe Lucas says, "Don't squeeze so hard--it's not a
    bulb horn!"

    Back then I was young and trusting, but now I wonder whether
    there was an actual Joe, whose designs were deeply flawed
    because the light over his drafting table had burnt out, or
    if he was just an urban legend like Martha Stewart.

    Carl Fogel
     
  7. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    Ted Bennett <tedbennett@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:<tedbennett-6E3179.22075011032004@news1.west.earthlink.net>...
    > "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:
    >
    > > > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the
    > > > MG Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in.
    > > > So maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so
    > > > simple, they even forgot to get the electrics right in
    > > > most! Mine ran like a top, but the electrics were
    > > > "interesting" to say the least.
    > >
    > > They say that the reason British people prefer warm beer
    > > is that they all have Lucas refrigerators.
    >
    >
    > Lucas, the Prince of Darkness.
    >
    > The way they maintained their uniformly abysmal quality
    > was to pack their products in brine and send them by the
    > slowest boat available.

    Dear David,

    If motorcycles were wide enough for bumper stickers, these
    are some of the things that we wanted to put on fenders
    attached to Lucas-powered lights, ignitions, and horns
    thirty years ago:

    Joe Lucas--Prince of Darkness! Joe Lucas says, "Don't ride
    in the dark!" Joe Lucas says, "That IS the high beam!"

    Joe Lucas says, "Kick it again--it might wake up!" Joe
    Lucas says, "Not slippery when wet--immobile!" Joe Lucas
    says, "Don't ride when it's wet!"

    Joe Lucas says, "Don't squeeze so hard--it's not a
    bulb horn!"

    Back then I was young and trusting, but now I wonder whether
    there was an actual Joe, whose designs were deeply flawed
    because the light over his drafting table had burnt out, or
    if he was just an urban legend like Martha Stewart.

    Carl Fogel
     
  8. Ningi

    Ningi Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote in message news:<pan.2004.03.12.01.01.52.297754@lehigh.edu>...
    > On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 16:20:51 -0800, Mike S. wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the MG
    > > Midget! Talk about a fun thing to drive around in. So
    > > maneuverable, quick (vs. fast), and simple. Its so
    > > simple, they even forgot to get the electrics right in
    > > most! Mine ran like a top, but the electrics were
    > > "interesting" to say the least.
    >
    > They say that the reason British people prefer warm beer
    > is that they all have Lucas refrigerators.

    Refrigerators are allegedly the most reliable household
    appliances, due to the minimal number of moving parts, but
    I'm sure that Lucas, in their heyday, could STILL have
    messed one up.

    The reason we like 'warm' (a few degrees below room temp)
    beer is due to the fact that you can actually _taste_ beer
    at that temp, and good English style beer tastes good :)

    Pete
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Ningi wrote:

    > The reason we like 'warm' (a few degrees below room temp)
    > beer is due to the fact that you can actually _taste_ beer
    > at that temp, and good English style beer tastes good :)

    This is true, on both points. Maybe our (American) beer is
    better cold!

    Matt O.
     
  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 12 Mar 2004 12:49:21 -0800, ningi@blueyonder.co.uk (Ningi) wrote:
    >Refrigerators are allegedly the most reliable household
    >appliances, due to the minimal number of moving parts, but
    >I'm sure that Lucas, in their heyday, could STILL have
    >messed one up.

    My oven has no moving parts whatsoever.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  11. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2003
    Messages:
    241
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    0
    Dear Rick,

    Not even a door?

    Sylvia Plath
     
  12. carlfogel <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > Dear Rick,
    >
    > Not even a door?
    >
    > Sylvia Plath

    jesus, carl, that's in pretty bad taste. i mean even for
    you.
    --
    david reuteler reuteler@visi.com
     
  13. ningi@blueyonder.co.uk (Ningi) wrote in
    news:92fafa28.0403121249.5498dde6@posting.google.com:

    >
    > The reason we like 'warm' (a few degrees below room temp)
    > beer is due to the fact that you can actually _taste_ beer
    > at that temp, and good English style beer tastes good :)
    >
    > Pete
    >
    Not to worry, the rooms in the UK are so damn cold that the
    beer usually frosty.
     
  14. froteur

    froteur New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am an owner of a )sort of) classic steel framed bike. a circa 1973 Gitane Tour de France. I've always liked that geometry and the lugged steel bike look. However, when it came time to buy a new bike this month, I opted for a sloping design. I did so because I am 5'2" and the sloping seat tube gives me much better stand over room. I think I would be one of the group that Mr Chisolm feels a compact geometry is appropriate for. So far I love my new bike (especially since I was on 30 year old technology before this).
     
  15. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <tsherman@qconline.com> wrote in message
    news:c2r4ap$20avve$1@ID-81487.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > Mike S. wrote:
    >
    > > ... Sure beats that wimpy British Racing Green... mmmm
    > > Jag E-Type, Triumph
    TR6,
    > > my little Midget, mmmm...
    > >
    > > OT: I miss that little skateboard of a car called the MG
    > > Midget! Talk
    about
    > > a fun thing to drive around in. So maneuverable, quick
    > > (vs. fast), and simple. Its so simple, they even forgot
    > > to get the electrics right in
    most!
    > > Mine ran like a top, but the electrics were
    > > "interesting" to say the
    least.
    > > If I hadn't t-boned a Beretta in it, I was going to rip
    > > out the wiring harness and re-do it.
    >
    > I still have a MG Midget (I think). It last ran in 1989,
    > when I gave up on it as being the most unreliable piece of
    > machinery ever invented. While it was fun to drive, it was
    > not fun sitting on the side of the road waiting for a tow-
    > truck. Practically everthing electrical and mechnical on
    > it had problems.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Quad Cities (Illinois Side)

    Damn! Too bad you're not closer to San Diego! I'd offer to
    take it off your hands. I do not want to drive to Ill for
    one though...

    Mike
     
  16. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <matt@deltanet.com> wrote in message
    news:3Fq4c.2368$F9.1364@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
    > Ningi wrote:
    >
    > > The reason we like 'warm' (a few degrees below room
    > > temp) beer is due to the fact that you can actually
    > > _taste_ beer at that temp, and good English style beer
    > > tastes good :)
    >
    > This is true, on both points. Maybe our (American) beer is
    > better cold!
    >
    > Matt O.
    >
    American beer tastes like shite. Nice thing is that if you
    keep them cold enough, you can't taste them.

    I like drinking some of the darker American beers: Sam Adams
    and the like. They're better towards the bottom when they
    warm up a bit. Hey! That sounds like what the brits do from
    the start...

    Mike
     
  17. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    David Reuteler <reuteler@visi.com> wrote in message news:<40524995$0$41296$a1866201@newsreader.visi.com>...
    > carlfogel <usenet-forum@cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > > Dear Rick,
    > >
    > > Not even a door?
    > >
    > > Sylvia Plath
    >
    > jesus, carl, that's in pretty bad taste. i mean even
    > for you.

    Dear David,

    Just what I thought when I came home and wanted to warm up
    my dinner.

    Ted Hughes
     
  18. froteur-<< I opted for a sloping design. I did so because I
    am 5'2" and the sloping seat tube gives me much better stand
    over room. I think I would be one of the group that Mr
    Chisolm feels a compact geometry is appropriate for.
    >><BR><BR>

    It's ChisHolm and yes, your dimensions do make compact a
    good idea for you.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  19. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 21:31:25 -0500, "David L. Johnson"
    <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:
    >That smacks of rationalization. But, for me, real 'Merican
    >beer better be very cold, or it tastes like the diluted
    >beaver piss that it is.

    Hmm...maybe I ought to get a pet beaver. You know, free
    beer and all.

    Actually, this thread could now get VERY dirty VERY fast...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  20. carlfogel

    carlfogel New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2003
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dear Rick,

    Since Mr. Rogers is gone, it's up to the likes of
    me to hear your concern and think of the children.

    Last week, I left rather late on my daily ride,
    having wasted too much time on pesky clients
    who should have kept their computer problems
    to themselves.

    It was getting on toward sunset, but things
    were going well and I was thinking about how
    it was all going to work out just fine when I
    rolled past a large beaver, who was heading
    in the opposite direction.

    At this point, the two-lane highway runs between
    a hundred-and-fifty-foot bluff and the half-mile
    pond of a sand and gravel company, beyond
    which lies the Arkansas River. A modest hill
    hid the pond and river from the errant rodent.

    Experience suggested that the beaver had
    cleverly found the six-inch-deep drainage
    ditch on the bluff-side of the highway and
    proposed to make its home there until such
    time as it perished under some startled
    driver's wheels.

    Cursing, I stopped and walked my bike back
    to escort the wayward creature to more
    suitable quarters. (Snapping turtles are
    easier--you just slide a hand in under the
    shell from the back and carry them.)

    The beaver shuffled along in the prairie
    grass by the road while I offered a reassuring
    stream of inane chatter (effortlessly, as you
    might guess). Occasionally, some particularly
    objectionable comment would be too much
    for the beaver, which would spin to the side
    and slap its tail at me in disapproval. It's hard
    to think of a more pathetic sight than a worried
    beaver slapping its tail on dry prairie grass.

    After a slow quarter of a mile, we cleared the
    small hill and I chivvied the poor beast across
    the road and eventually to the large pond,
    where it waddled in and then lay stretched
    out in the cold water in the twilight, apparently
    luxuriating after what must have been a hot,
    unpleasant, and frightening forced march over
    dry ground on sore paws, pursued by a strange
    babbling creature with two wheels.

    Then I rode home cautiously in the dark.

    So there you are--nothing dirty, no beer,
    not even a suicidal poet. You and David can
    stop worrying now, turn out the lights, and
    go to sleep.

    Beatrix Potter
     
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