correct pressure?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Red_74, Sep 15, 2004.

  1. Red_74

    Red_74 Guest

    Hi there!

    I've always been using mountain bikes, but recently I've enjoyed my first
    racing bike, for faster commuting. The (slick) tires are very thin, ca.
    1inch, and I have no idea what is the reasonable pressure for them. I pumped
    them up as much as I could, and riding is great. I'm only not sure whether
    it is safe enough or not, especially in the rain (are the slicks ok in the
    rain at all?), the grip is far worse than what I'm used to in my mntn
    bike...

    any clues highly appreciated,

    --
    cheers! Red
    http://linx.by/red_74
     
    Tags:


  2. Red_74 wrote:
    > Hi there!
    >
    > I've always been using mountain bikes, but recently I've enjoyed my
    > first racing bike, for faster commuting. The (slick) tires are very
    > thin, ca. 1inch, and I have no idea what is the reasonable pressure
    > for them. I pumped them up as much as I could, and riding is great.
    > I'm only not sure whether it is safe enough or not, especially in the
    > rain (are the slicks ok in the rain at all?), the grip is far worse
    > than what I'm used to in my mntn bike...
    >
    > any clues highly appreciated,


    The recommended pressure can usually be read on the tire itself if you look
    closely. Anywhere between 80 -140 psi depending on what kind of tire you
    have. The thinner the tire the higher the pressure.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  3. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Per Elmsäter" <perDOTelmsater@telia.com> wrote in news:r432d.103435$dP1.372281
    @newsc.telia.net:
    > The recommended pressure can usually be read on the tire itself if you look
    > closely. Anywhere between 80 -140 psi depending on what kind of tire you
    > have. The thinner the tire the higher the pressure.


    That is the maximum pressure, not the "recommended" pressure. Using the
    maximum on any roads that aren't perfectly smooth will give you a harsh ride
    and more flats. Here's are a couple of articles on "recommended" tire
    pressures:
    http://www.roadbikerider.com/UArant.htm
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html#pressure
     
  4. Greg

    Greg Guest

    "Red_74" <redroy_74@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:<ciae7b$sr7$1@domitilla.aioe.org>...
    > Hi there!
    >
    > I've always been using mountain bikes, but recently I've enjoyed my first
    > racing bike, for faster commuting. The (slick) tires are very thin, ca.
    > 1inch, and I have no idea what is the reasonable pressure for them. I pumped
    > them up as much as I could, and riding is great. I'm only not sure whether
    > it is safe enough or not, especially in the rain (are the slicks ok in the
    > rain at all?), the grip is far worse than what I'm used to in my mntn
    > bike...
    >
    > any clues highly appreciated,


    Slicks will give as good of traction in the rain, on pavement, as any
    bike tire with a tread. This is because of the small footprint or
    patch on the road surface. Manufactures put a tread on most road tires
    because people (customers) think it needs it, not because it does need
    it.
     
  5. Ken wrote:
    > "Per Elmsäter" <perDOTelmsater@telia.com> wrote in
    > news:r432d.103435$dP1.372281 @newsc.telia.net:
    >> The recommended pressure can usually be read on the tire itself if
    >> you look closely. Anywhere between 80 -140 psi depending on what
    >> kind of tire you have. The thinner the tire the higher the pressure.

    >
    > That is the maximum pressure, not the "recommended" pressure. Using
    > the maximum on any roads that aren't perfectly smooth will give you a
    > harsh ride and more flats. Here's are a couple of articles on
    > "recommended" tire pressures:
    > http://www.roadbikerider.com/UArant.htm
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html#pressure


    Some tires are marked with a Min and Max pressure, others are marked with a
    recommended pressure.
    Using the maximum on roads that are perfectly smooth will give you a faster
    ride and fewer pinch flats.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  6. Red_74

    Red_74 Guest

    Thanks for the hints and links, guys. The numbers on the (Michelin) tire are
    almost invisible though.

    --
    cheers! Red
    http://linx.by/red_74
     
  7. Red_74 wrote:
    > Thanks for the hints and links, guys. The numbers on the (Michelin)
    > tire are almost invisible though.


    My eyes aren't what they used to be and I have to wet the tire turn it
    towards the sun and use a magnifying glass.
    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
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