Date these deraileurs

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ken Marcet, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. Ken Marcet

    Ken Marcet Guest

    Cleaning the grime from these vintage, read "old" parts I uncovered the
    model names of "Eagle" for the rear, and "Thunderbird"for the front, both
    are Shimano.
    Can anyone narrow down the years these were made? I know it is somewhere in
    the late 60's to mid 70's. Was kind on hoping too narrow it down to a few
    years.

    Ken

    --
    More of my mind dribblings: http://mind-dribble.blogspot.com/
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  2. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    Ken Marcet wrote:
    > Cleaning the grime from these vintage, read "old" parts I uncovered

    the
    > model names of "Eagle" for the rear, and "Thunderbird"for the front,

    both
    > are Shimano.
    > Can anyone narrow down the years these were made? I know it is

    somewhere in
    > the late 60's to mid 70's. Was kind on hoping too narrow it down to a

    few
    > years.
    >
    > Ken


    I think that's about as narrow as you'll get. Shimano in that time
    period did not change their model designations every couple years as
    they do now. I would guess early to mid-'70's is most likely. I'm not
    an authority, though.

    Jeff
     
  3. Bob Hanson

    Bob Hanson Guest

    According to "The Dancing Chain" (THE book about the history of
    derailleurs), 4 different "Eagle" models were first introduced in 1975.
    Two were classified as "low price medium range" and the other 2 "low
    price wide range". There's no indication when they ceased production.

    Bob H.
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Ken Marcet wrote:
    > Cleaning the grime from these vintage, read "old" parts I uncovered the
    > model names of "Eagle" for the rear, and "Thunderbird"for the front, both
    > are Shimano.
    > Can anyone narrow down the years these were made? I know it is somewhere in
    > the late 60's to mid 70's. Was kind on hoping too narrow it down to a few
    > years.


    Seventies.

    Eagle, Thunderbird, Lark, Lark-W, Crane, all the other birds
    and then Poseidon.

    err, Positron.

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  5. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    Also, I gave up dating derailleurs when I got married. Not only does my
    wife index, she cross-references, too!

    Jeff
     
  6. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Bob Hanson wrote:
    > According to "The Dancing Chain" (THE book about the history of
    > derailleurs), 4 different "Eagle" models were first introduced in 1975.
    > Two were classified as "low price medium range" and the other 2 "low
    > price wide range". There's no indication when they ceased production.


    I'm pretty sure I had a bike with an Eagle rear, purchased new in 1972.

    Mark Janeba
     
  7. Ken Marcet

    Ken Marcet Guest

    oh i get it now! Ha Ha

    "JeffWills" <jwills@pacifier.com> wrote in message
    news:1110055684.803503.176110@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    > Also, I gave up dating derailleurs when I got married. Not only does my
    > wife index, she cross-references, too!
    >
    > Jeff
    >
     
  8. Mark Janeba <mandPLEASEmljDONT@comSPAMcast.net> writes:

    >Bob Hanson wrote:
    >> According to "The Dancing Chain" (THE book about the history of
    >> derailleurs), 4 different "Eagle" models were first introduced in 1975.
    >> Two were classified as "low price medium range" and the other 2 "low
    >> price wide range". There's no indication when they ceased production.


    >I'm pretty sure I had a bike with an Eagle rear, purchased new in 1972.


    Are you sure it's not a Lark ?? They look pretty similar, if my badly
    rusted memory serves ... One has a "moon unit" metal C-shaped guard
    as you look at the freewheel, with many large holes all the way along
    it ... a popular style during the moon program, 1965-1973.

    - Don Gillies
    San Diego, CA
     
  9. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    JeffWills wrote:

    > Also, I gave up dating derailleurs when I got married. Not only does my
    > wife index, she cross-references, too!


    Does your wife have Campy, Shimano or SRAM ESP shifter compatible spacing?

    --
    Tom Sherman - Earth
     
  10. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Donald Gillies wrote:

    > Mark Janeba <mandPLEASEmljDONT@comSPAMcast.net> writes:
    >>I'm pretty sure I had a bike with an Eagle rear, purchased new in 1972.

    >
    > Are you sure it's not a Lark ?? They look pretty similar, if my badly
    > rusted memory serves ... One has a "moon unit" metal C-shaped guard
    > as you look at the freewheel, with many large holes all the way along
    > it ... a popular style during the moon program, 1965-1973.


    It's been a long time, and the guard you describe is familiar. But, um,
    - which one had the guard? Lark or Eagle?

    As I think of it, the bike brand was "American Eagle", precursor to
    Nishiki, I think - but I still thought the rear der. was an Eagle also.

    Did they also market the Bogie model at that time?

    Mark
     
  11. Ken Marcet

    Ken Marcet Guest

    "Donald Gillies" <gillies@cs.ubc.ca> wrote in message
    news:d0ddum$n78$1@cascade.cs.ubc.ca...
    > Mark Janeba <mandPLEASEmljDONT@comSPAMcast.net> writes:
    >
    > >Bob Hanson wrote:
    > >> According to "The Dancing Chain" (THE book about the history of
    > >> derailleurs), 4 different "Eagle" models were first introduced in 1975.
    > >> Two were classified as "low price medium range" and the other 2 "low
    > >> price wide range". There's no indication when they ceased production.

    >
    > >I'm pretty sure I had a bike with an Eagle rear, purchased new in 1972.

    >
    > Are you sure it's not a Lark ?? They look pretty similar, if my badly
    > rusted memory serves ... One has a "moon unit" metal C-shaped guard
    > as you look at the freewheel, with many large holes all the way along
    > it ... a popular style during the moon program, 1965-1973.
    >
    > - Don Gillies
    > San Diego, CA


    That is exactly what mine looks like! And it has the model name "Eagle" on
    it.

    Ken
     
  12. Ken Marcet

    Ken Marcet Guest

    "Tom Sherman" <tsherman@qconline.com> wrote in message
    news:38ut90F5ovjnoU1@individual.net...
    > JeffWills wrote:
    >
    > > Also, I gave up dating derailleurs when I got married. Not only does my
    > > wife index, she cross-references, too!

    >
    > Does your wife have Campy, Shimano or SRAM ESP shifter compatible spacing?


    Well if she indexes and cross references, perhaps she is universal.


    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Earth
    >
     
  13. JeffWills

    JeffWills Guest

    Tom Sherman wrote:
    > JeffWills wrote:
    >
    > > Also, I gave up dating derailleurs when I got married. Not only

    does my
    > > wife index, she cross-references, too!

    >
    > Does your wife have Campy, Shimano or SRAM ESP shifter compatible

    spacing?
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Earth


    Asking those kinds of questions will cause her to shift unpredictably.

    Jeff Wills - Mars, of course
     
  14. Mark Janeba wrote:

    >>Are you sure it's not a Lark ?? They look pretty similar, if my badly
    >>rusted memory serves ... One has a "moon unit" metal C-shaped guard
    >>as you look at the freewheel, with many large holes all the way along
    >>it ... a popular style during the moon program, 1965-1973.


    The Lark and the Eagle were identical, except that the Eagle had an
    additional "bumper" to protect it from impact, and an extra heavy duty
    adapter claw.

    These were the best shifting derailers money could buy through the early
    '80s. Nothing else came close. They're also probably the sturdiest
    derailers ever made. As to weight...well, you can't have everything.

    They also had a great "pre-selector" feature: The cable anchor bolt was
    mounted on a pivoting arm with a stiff spring (didn't require a separate
    spring, it used the normally unoccupied end of the parallelogram return
    spring.)

    With this system, if you forgot to downshift as you came to a stop, you
    could just yank the lever back to the position that corresponded to
    whichever gear you preferred for starting up. With most derailers this
    would bust the cable, but with the Lark/Eagle the spring loaded arm
    would deflect, then as soon as you started to pedal, the derailer would
    down shift to the desired gear.

    I've got a 400LX on my Rambouillet, I think this was the last Shimano
    model to have this nifty feature. Never understood why they stopped
    doing it...

    Sheldon "For The Birds" Brown
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