Fixed Gear Rear wheel question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by wasabiboys@gmail.com, Aug 26, 2006.

  1. Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    no no.


    Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    hard.

    any ideas would really help
     
    Tags:


  2. On 26 Aug 2006 22:21:49 -0700, wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:

    >Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    >using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    >However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    >release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    >release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    >no no.
    >
    >
    >Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    >hard.
    >
    >any ideas would really help


    Dear W.,

    Quick-release rear axles seem to hold just fine in the Tour de France
    against forces greater than most of us manage.

    As usual, Sheldon Brown has something sensible to say:

    Solid-Axle vs Quick Release

    Conventional wisdom is that you need a solid (nutted or "bolt-on")
    axle hub for fixed-gear or singlespeed use, and that a quick-release
    will not hold the wheel solidly enogh in a horizontal fork end. This
    is not true, however.

    Since most newer bikes have vertical dropouts, people have gotten used
    to wimpy aluminum skewers, and often don't adjust them as tightly as
    they might. If you use a good quality (I think Shimano is the best)
    skewer, tightened securely, it will hold just fine.

    A quick release is a considerable timesaver in switching a flip-flop
    wheel around, and having a QR means that you don't need to carry a big
    wrench to be able to replace a damaged inner tube.

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html\

    Sheldon has a good deal more to say about single speed and fixed gear
    bicycles, so you ought to browse his site.

    Cheers,

    Carl Fogel
     
  3. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.
    >
    >
    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    what hub is it and how are you going to convert it to fixed?

    in addition to what carl said, i would think the campy skewer you
    probably have will have about as much holding force as a shimano skewer.
     
  4. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.
    >
    >
    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    what hub is it and how are you going to convert it to fixed?

    in addition to what carl said, i would think the campy skewer you
    probably have will have about as much holding force as a shimano skewer
    (i don't think that quality closed-cam skewers vary much in this
    regard, but it makes sense to stay away from any open-cam skewer for
    this). good luck
     
  5. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.
    >
    >
    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    what hub is it and how are you going to convert it to fixed?

    in addition to what carl said, i would think the campy skewer you
    probably have will have about as much holding force as a shimano skewer
    (i don't think that quality closed-cam skewers vary much in this
    regard, but it makes sense to stay away from any open-cam skewer for
    this). good luck
     
  6. On 26 Aug 2006 23:44:43 -0700, "Nate Knutson" <bikenate@riseup.net>
    wrote:

    >
    >wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    >> Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    >> using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    >> However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    >> I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    >> release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    >> release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    >> no no.
    >>
    >>
    >> Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    >> hard.
    >>
    >> any ideas would really help

    >
    >what hub is it and how are you going to convert it to fixed?
    >
    >in addition to what carl said, i would think the campy skewer you
    >probably have will have about as much holding force as a shimano skewer
    >(i don't think that quality closed-cam skewers vary much in this
    >regard, but it makes sense to stay away from any open-cam skewer for
    >this). good luck


    Dear Nate,

    Sorry, but I can't resist it . . .

    Just the place for a Skewer! I have said it twice:
    That alone should encourage the crew.
    Just the place for a Skewer! I have said it thrice:
    What I tell you three times is true.

    Cheers,

    Chuck Dodgson
     
  7. wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.
    >
    >
    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    Use the QR..you ride a normal bike with horizontal dropouts and the
    wheel doesn't move around....
     
  8. On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 22:21:49 -0700, wasabiboys wrote:

    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.


    I've converted my fixed gear wheel to a quick release, and have thousands
    of miles on it. No problems. If you think about it, there is no
    difference in the forces acting on a fixed gear hub and a derailleur hub
    sitting in a bike with horizontal dropouts. Millions of such bikes work
    fine, with no nonsense about wheels moving in the dropouts.

    Obviously, you need to keep the Q/R tight, and use a good brand like
    Shimano or Campy. This is not the place for a stupid-light quick release.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a
    _`\(,_ | conclusion. -- George Bernard Shaw
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  9. Thanks for the input on the wheel. Yes I do have a good quality Shimano
    skewer on there and the limited has horizontal dropouts..

    David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 22:21:49 -0700, wasabiboys wrote:
    >
    > > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > > no no.

    >
    > I've converted my fixed gear wheel to a quick release, and have thousands
    > of miles on it. No problems. If you think about it, there is no
    > difference in the forces acting on a fixed gear hub and a derailleur hub
    > sitting in a bike with horizontal dropouts. Millions of such bikes work
    > fine, with no nonsense about wheels moving in the dropouts.
    >
    > Obviously, you need to keep the Q/R tight, and use a good brand like
    > Shimano or Campy. This is not the place for a stupid-light quick release.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a
    > _`\(,_ | conclusion. -- George Bernard Shaw
    > (_)/ (_) |
     
  10. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <1156656109.364022.284970@75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>,
    wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:

    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard
    > hub. However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can
    > quick release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick
    > release is a no no.


    Bullshit. It's a no-no at the velodrome because the rules forbid QR
    wheels, but many thousands of fixed gear bikes use QR hubs. Just clamp
    it down tight.

    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    Use the wheel. It will be fine.
     
  11. wasabiboys@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    > using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard hub.
    > However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    > I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    > release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can quick
    > release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick release is a
    > no no.
    >
    >
    > Converting it to a solid axle I have done to other wheels so not that
    > hard.
    >
    > any ideas would really help


    As others have said, a quick release will work just fine.

    >From my own experience, I'd recommend using a 'tug-nut', too. It makes

    chain adjustment (IMPORTANT on a fixie) very easy.

    Lewis.

    ******
     
  12. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <1156701311.792613.181640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com>,
    limeylew@gmail.com wrote (or maybe somebody else did as the the quote
    string was screwed up):

    > From my own experience, I'd recommend using a 'tug-nut', too. It makes
    > chain adjustment (IMPORTANT on a fixie) very easy.


    Just more crap to get in the way when you have to take the wheel out to
    fix a flat. Tug nuts are only used on rear-facing "dropouts" which IMHO
    have no business on a bike being used on the road. Getting the wheel
    out is just too much of a PITA with these. Forward opening dropouts
    were designed for a practical reason- to make it simple to get the wheel
    out. On a velodrome you almost never get a puncture, so rear-facing
    dropouts are fine there. The use of these on bikes ridden on city
    streets is part of the fad.
     
  13. On Sun, 27 Aug 2006 14:14:13 -0500, Tim McNamara wrote:

    > In article <1156701311.792613.181640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com>,
    > limeylew@gmail.com wrote (or maybe somebody else did as the the quote
    > string was screwed up):
    >
    >> From my own experience, I'd recommend using a 'tug-nut', too. It makes
    >> chain adjustment (IMPORTANT on a fixie) very easy.

    >
    > Just more crap to get in the way when you have to take the wheel out to
    > fix a flat. Tug nuts are only used on rear-facing "dropouts" which IMHO
    > have no business on a bike being used on the road. Getting the wheel
    > out is just too much of a PITA with these. Forward opening dropouts
    > were designed for a practical reason- to make it simple to get the wheel
    > out. On a velodrome you almost never get a puncture, so rear-facing
    > dropouts are fine there. The use of these on bikes ridden on city
    > streets is part of the fad.


    Have you by any chance ever changed a flat on a bike with track ends?
    This is silly. It is in fact easier to change a flat with such a bike
    than with one having old-fashioned horizontal dropouts. You just loosen
    the wheel, push it forward a bit, roll the chain off the sprocket and hook
    it over the dropout, and pull the wheel out.

    I do agree that tug nuts are a waste of time, both unneeded and a
    hinderance to changing a flat.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | If all economists were laid end to end, they would not reach a
    _`\(,_ | conclusion. -- George Bernard Shaw
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  14. David L. Johnson wrote:
    > On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 22:21:49 -0700, wasabiboys wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, I am starting to build up a Bianchi Limited into a Fixie. I am
    >> using a custom Nashbar wheel with a Campy Hub, non track standard
    >> hub. However, it is a quick release and not solid axle.
    >> I have one major question. will there be any problems with a quick
    >> release and not solid axle. Will there be chain dropping and can
    >> quick release wheel loosened up. Someone told me fixie and quick
    >> release is a no no.

    >
    > I've converted my fixed gear wheel to a quick release, and have
    > thousands of miles on it. No problems. If you think about it, there
    > is no difference in the forces acting on a fixed gear hub and a
    > derailleur hub sitting in a bike with horizontal dropouts.


    If they're in the same gear, that is. As I've learned from here before,
    small rear cogs and small front cogs increase chain tension. If the gearing
    is tall with large cogs, front and rear, it'll be better than the derailleur
    setup.

    --
    Phil Lee, Squid
     
  15. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <-umcnQWonejrbmzZUSdV9g@ptd.net>,
    "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh.edu> wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Aug 2006 14:14:13 -0500, Tim McNamara wrote:
    >
    > > In article <1156701311.792613.181640@74g2000cwt.googlegroups.com>,
    > > limeylew@gmail.com wrote (or maybe somebody else did as the the
    > > quote
    > > string was screwed up):
    > >
    > >> From my own experience, I'd recommend using a 'tug-nut', too. It
    > >> makes chain adjustment (IMPORTANT on a fixie) very easy.

    > >
    > > Just more crap to get in the way when you have to take the wheel
    > > out to fix a flat. Tug nuts are only used on rear-facing
    > > "dropouts" which IMHO have no business on a bike being used on the
    > > road. Getting the wheel out is just too much of a PITA with these.
    > > Forward opening dropouts were designed for a practical reason- to
    > > make it simple to get the wheel out. On a velodrome you almost
    > > never get a puncture, so rear-facing dropouts are fine there. The
    > > use of these on bikes ridden on city streets is part of the fad.

    >
    > Have you by any chance ever changed a flat on a bike with track ends?
    > This is silly. It is in fact easier to change a flat with such a
    > bike than with one having old-fashioned horizontal dropouts. You
    > just loosen the wheel, push it forward a bit, roll the chain off the
    > sprocket and hook it over the dropout, and pull the wheel out.


    Oh, yeah, having ridden my track bike as a commuter for several years.
    I'm familiar with the drill. When I built a replacement frame, I used
    front facing dropouts as they eliminate three of the four steps you
    cite. Makes getting the wheel out much simpler and reduces contact with
    the oily chain significantly. If you put a chain hangers on the
    chainstay you don't have to touch the chain at all, as long as you can
    keep the bike upright while the wheel is out (no derailleur to retain
    the chain).

    I'm really baffled by the bike company (Klein, I think) that uses
    rear-opening dropouts on their derailleur bikes. Jeez.

    > I do agree that tug nuts are a waste of time, both unneeded and a
    > hinderance to changing a flat.


    I don't get the deal with tug nuts. It's easy to center a rim and get
    the chain tension right. Unless the dropouts or the frame are out of
    alignment. If you use track nuts with captive washers, a wonderful
    invention for this application, it's even easier.
     
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