Hand pain, tried the usual, nothing helps. Can you?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by bryanska, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. bryanska

    bryanska Guest

    I have hand pain. This has been a problem since I bought my rig last
    year, and approx. 100 miles hasn't acclimated me to it. I'm a
    newbie to road cycling. It's a real problem and I don't think I can
    ride the 150-miler I have scheduled in June.

    It is not tingly or numb pain. My carpal nerve is never irritated.
    Rather, it feels like I'm being pushed from behind when I'm on any
    part of my road handlebars. Too much weight?

    On the brake hoods, the webs of my hands feel "jammed" toward me and my
    thumb & forefinger feel split. In the drops it feels like I'm pushing
    horizontal poles into a wall. On the straights (top part of the bars) I
    get some relief, but not much. I can't stay in any position for more
    than a mile. Two miles in one position has me shaking the pressure out
    of my hands. When I move my butt back and hang off the rear of the
    seat, I get some relief. Only constant spinning brings lasting relief.
    I keep my elbows bent. I suppose my back could be more arched.

    I have good gloves. Double-padding the bar helped a little but not
    much. I used an online fit calculator and it seems my bike is within a
    couple cm of the right dimensions.

    My rig is a 1992 Schwinn Tempo I bought last year with less than 50
    miles. The bars are standard non-ergo drops, narrower than modern ones,
    but I have narrow shoulders. The stem is a Cinelli 1A expansion-style,
    not quill. The brakes are original Shimano 150s with rubber hoods that
    aren't as long as modern bikes, so I can barely wrap the first two
    fingers underneath. I have clip pedals and a correct leg bend.

    I've tried the usual remedies. Suggestions are appreciated. I wonder
    if the top tube is too short? The fit calculators don't think so.
    Maybe higher handlebars? They're currently level with the seat (I'm
    a shorter guy, 5'8").

    I've sunk enough money ($450) into just trying roading, to see if I
    want to buy a serious bike and clothing in a year or so. I don't
    think I can buy a new bike right now but don't want to sit out the
    season.

    Thanks to this awesome group. You've already convinced me to give
    this sport a shot.
     
    Tags:


  2. bryanska

    bryanska Guest

    Thanks for replying - I've seen that article. I adhere to most of it,
    but I should ask all of you -

    Are you constantly pulling up with your back when you ride? If so, can
    people really ride 80+ miles/day like that?

    If that's the case, it seems that's the only posture aspect I'm not
    doing right.
     
  3. bentbrian

    bentbrian New Member

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    If all else fails get a recumbent. No pain, more fun.
     
  4. jhas

    jhas Guest

  5. jj

    jj Guest

    On 14 Apr 2005 10:43:51 -0700, "bryanska" <BARRELBACK@HOTMAIL.COM> wrote:

    >Thanks for replying - I've seen that article. I adhere to most of it,
    >but I should ask all of you -
    >
    >Are you constantly pulling up with your back when you ride? If so, can
    >people really ride 80+ miles/day like that?
    >
    >If that's the case, it seems that's the only posture aspect I'm not
    >doing right.


    When riding on the hoods, riding briskly, you pass another cyclist going
    the other direction. You raise your left hand to wave. What happens to your
    line?

    jj
     
  6. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 14:27:43 -0400, jj wrote:

    > When riding on the hoods, riding briskly, you pass another cyclist going
    > the other direction. You raise your left hand to wave. What happens to
    > your line?
    >
    > jj


    Well, if she's really cute, I can't remember it.


    X-)

    badoomtisch.
     
  7. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    bryanska <BARRELBACK@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > On the brake hoods, the webs of my hands feel "jammed" toward me and my
    > thumb & forefinger feel split. In the drops it feels like I'm pushing
    > horizontal poles into a wall. On the straights (top part of the bars) I
    > get some relief, but not much. I can't stay in any position for more
    > than a mile. Two miles in one position has me shaking the pressure out
    > of my hands. When I move my butt back and hang off the rear of the
    > seat, I get some relief. Only constant spinning brings lasting relief.
    > I keep my elbows bent. I suppose my back could be more arched.


    I had this exact same problem when I moved to my most recent bike. It
    was a little less severe, but your description is spot on.

    Your brake hoods are most likely too far forward.

    Try loosening the clamp on your bar and tilting it up some. If that
    helps (as I suspect), try moving the brakes levers/brifters further up
    the bar. Alternatively you might try a shorter stem.

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g
    Cats are smarter than dogs.
    You can't make eight cats pull a sled through the snow.
     
  8. jj

    jj Guest

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 18:57:14 GMT, maxo <maxo@NOSPAMhome.se> wrote:

    >On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 14:27:43 -0400, jj wrote:
    >
    >> When riding on the hoods, riding briskly, you pass another cyclist going
    >> the other direction. You raise your left hand to wave. What happens to
    >> your line?
    >>
    >> jj

    >
    >Well, if she's really cute, I can't remember it.
    >
    >
    >X-)
    >
    >badoomtisch.


    We'll be here all week. Please tip your waitresses.

    jj
     
  9. On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 10:43:51 -0700, bryanska wrote:

    > Thanks for replying - I've seen that article. I adhere to most of it,
    > but I should ask all of you -
    >
    > Are you constantly pulling up with your back when you ride?


    No, of course not.

    > If that's the case, it seems that's the only posture aspect I'm not
    > doing right.


    I still bet on saddle angle.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    internet has proven this not to be the case.
     
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    Raise the bars, raise the bars, raise the bars. Getting your bars higher and
    closer to you will help get the weight off, which will help you a bunch. I
    don't know exactly what type of stem you need, but a taller one with a
    shorter reach is a good idea.
     
  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Dane Jackson" <dane@unseen.edu> wrote in message
    news:tft2j2-onh.ln1@zuvembi.homelinux.org...
    > bryanska <BARRELBACK@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > On the brake hoods, the webs of my hands feel "jammed" toward me and my
    > > thumb & forefinger feel split. In the drops it feels like I'm pushing
    > > horizontal poles into a wall. On the straights (top part of the bars) I
    > > get some relief, but not much. I can't stay in any position for more
    > > than a mile. Two miles in one position has me shaking the pressure out
    > > of my hands. When I move my butt back and hang off the rear of the
    > > seat, I get some relief. Only constant spinning brings lasting relief.
    > > I keep my elbows bent. I suppose my back could be more arched.

    >
    > I had this exact same problem when I moved to my most recent bike. It
    > was a little less severe, but your description is spot on.
    >
    > Your brake hoods are most likely too far forward.
    >
    > Try loosening the clamp on your bar and tilting it up some. If that
    > helps (as I suspect), try moving the brakes levers/brifters further up
    > the bar. Alternatively you might try a shorter stem.


    You mean shorter reach, I assume. I think if the OP gets his bars close to
    even with his saddle height he'll notice a big difference.
     
  12. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    Gooserider <nopway@mousepotato.com> wrote:
    > "Dane Jackson" <dane@unseen.edu> wrote in message
    >>
    >> Try loosening the clamp on your bar and tilting it up some. If that
    >> helps (as I suspect), try moving the brakes levers/brifters further up
    >> the bar. Alternatively you might try a shorter stem.

    >
    > You mean shorter reach, I assume. I think if the OP gets his bars close to
    > even with his saddle height he'll notice a big difference.


    You are correct. I should have been more specific that I meant a laterally
    shorter stem, not raising it higher. Though that might help also if he has
    too far a drop. I had no problem hanging out in the drops or the top of the
    bar, but I had problems anytime I was on the hoods.

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g
    "I'll carry your books, I'll carry a tune, I'll carry on, carry over,
    carry forward, Cary Grant, cash & carry, Carry Me Back To Old Virginia,
    I'll even Hara Kari if you show me how, but I will *not* carry a gun."
    -- Hawkeye, M*A*S*H
     
  13. > I still bet on saddle angle.

    I second that. I get people bringing in bikes for repair all the time with
    saddles nose down. I ask them if they don't feel a bit of tension in their
    shoulders when they ride. They'll often get a bit defensive and say yes, why
    would I know that? Then I explain how a downward-tilting saddle is shoving
    them into the bars, so they're spending the entire ride pushing back with
    their arms & shoulders to maintain position.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "David L. Johnson" <david.johnson@lehigh-nospam.edu> wrote in message
    news:pan.2005.04.14.19.49.39.19340@lehigh-nospam.edu...
    > On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 10:43:51 -0700, bryanska wrote:
    >
    >> Thanks for replying - I've seen that article. I adhere to most of it,
    >> but I should ask all of you -
    >>
    >> Are you constantly pulling up with your back when you ride?

    >
    > No, of course not.
    >
    >> If that's the case, it seems that's the only posture aspect I'm not
    >> doing right.

    >
    > I still bet on saddle angle.
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | Some people used to claim that, if enough monkeys sat in front
    > _`\(,_ | of enough typewriters and typed long enough, eventually one of
    > (_)/ (_) | them would reproduce the collected works of Shakespeare. The
    > internet has proven this not to be the case.
    >
     
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