Hare casserole

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kathy-in-NZ, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. Kathy-in-NZ

    Kathy-in-NZ Guest

    I've had two meaty legs of wild hare in the freezer for a while. I was
    fascinated when I found them at a gourmet food store, but have been
    unsure how to use them.

    Tonight I'm taking a punt. After much research, I'm combining two
    different recipes.

    One has me marinating the meat in a combination of white wine, garlic,
    lemon juice, pinch cayenne, 1Tbsp oil, salt and pepper for 3-6 hours.
    This I've done. It goes on to cook the meat with the marinade, onions
    and celery. This I haven't done.

    Instead, I drained the meat of its marinade, patted it dry, tossed it
    in seasoned flour and browned it, and two rashers of chopped bacon, in
    a cast iron pan. Transferred meat to casserole dish. Caramelised
    sliced onion in pan. Transferred to casserole. Added a bit of flour to
    pan, cooked it out a little, added chicken stock, red wine, bay
    leaves, a little bit of cloves (sounded odd, but I thought I'd try it)
    and extra pepper.

    It's in the oven, cooking slowly for 3 hours.

    Don't know what it will taste like but it smells good. Unlike when I
    cut up the meat. It was quite off putting, but from research, hare
    should be soaked in a water/white vinegar mixture. I reckon the
    marinade will do the same job.

    Kathy in NZ
     
    Tags:


  2. ravenlynne

    ravenlynne Guest

    Kathy-in-NZ wrote:
    > I've had two meaty legs of wild hare in the freezer for a while. I was
    > fascinated when I found them at a gourmet food store, but have been
    > unsure how to use them.
    >
    > Tonight I'm taking a punt. After much research, I'm combining two
    > different recipes.
    >
    > One has me marinating the meat in a combination of white wine, garlic,
    > lemon juice, pinch cayenne, 1Tbsp oil, salt and pepper for 3-6 hours.
    > This I've done. It goes on to cook the meat with the marinade, onions
    > and celery. This I haven't done.
    >
    > Instead, I drained the meat of its marinade, patted it dry, tossed it
    > in seasoned flour and browned it, and two rashers of chopped bacon, in
    > a cast iron pan. Transferred meat to casserole dish. Caramelised
    > sliced onion in pan. Transferred to casserole. Added a bit of flour to
    > pan, cooked it out a little, added chicken stock, red wine, bay
    > leaves, a little bit of cloves (sounded odd, but I thought I'd try it)
    > and extra pepper.
    >
    > It's in the oven, cooking slowly for 3 hours.
    >
    > Don't know what it will taste like but it smells good. Unlike when I
    > cut up the meat. It was quite off putting, but from research, hare
    > should be soaked in a water/white vinegar mixture. I reckon the
    > marinade will do the same job.
    >
    > Kathy in NZ
    >


    Thanks for the idea! There's a local butcher shop in montesanto that
    has rabbit hanging in the window...I've wanted to try it and needed an
    idea...

    <runs to train>

    --
    "I'm thinking that if this dilemma grows any more horns, I'm going to
    shoot it and put it up on the wall."

    - Harry Dresden
     
  3. Kathy-in-NZ

    Kathy-in-NZ Guest

    On Apr 15, 6:56 pm, ravenlynne <ravenly...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Kathy-in-NZ wrote:
    > > I've had two meaty legs of wild hare in the freezer for a while. I was
    > > fascinated when I found them at a gourmet food store, but have been
    > > unsure how to use them.

    >
    > > Tonight I'm taking a punt. After much research, I'm combining two
    > > different recipes.

    >
    > > One has me marinating the meat in a combination of white wine, garlic,
    > > lemon juice, pinch cayenne, 1Tbsp oil, salt and pepper for 3-6 hours.
    > > This I've done. It goes on to cook the meat with the marinade, onions
    > > and celery. This I haven't done.

    >
    > > Instead, I drained the meat of its marinade, patted it dry, tossed it
    > > in seasoned flour and browned it, and two rashers of chopped bacon, in
    > > a cast iron pan. Transferred meat to casserole dish. Caramelised
    > > sliced onion in pan. Transferred to casserole. Added a bit of flour to
    > > pan, cooked it out a little, added chicken stock, red wine, bay
    > > leaves, a little bit of cloves (sounded odd, but I thought I'd try it)
    > > and extra pepper.

    >
    > > It's in the oven, cooking slowly for 3 hours.

    >
    > > Don't know what it will taste like but it smells good. Unlike when I
    > > cut up the meat. It was quite off putting, but from research, hare
    > > should be soaked in a water/white vinegar mixture. I reckon the
    > > marinade will do the same job.

    >
    > > Kathy in NZ

    >
    > Thanks for the idea! There's a local butcher shop in montesanto that
    > has rabbit hanging in the window...I've wanted to try it and needed an
    > idea...
    >
    > <runs to train>
    >
    > --
    > "I'm thinking that if this dilemma grows any more horns, I'm going to
    > shoot it and put it up on the wall."
    >
    > - Harry Dresden- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Apparently hare and rabbit are two quite different meats. Rabbit is
    classed as a white meat, whereas hare is red.

    I suggest you look for a different recipe, though the one time I tried
    rabbit (roasted) I didn't like the slightly bitter taste of it. Maybe
    it too could benefit from marinating.
     
  4. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Kathy-in-NZ wrote:
    >
    > Apparently hare and rabbit are two quite different meats. Rabbit is
    > classed as a white meat, whereas hare is red.
    >
    > I suggest you look for a different recipe, though the one time I tried
    > rabbit (roasted) I didn't like the slightly bitter taste of it. Maybe
    > it too could benefit from marinating.


    Rabbit is extremely lean and needs to be braised. I basically oil it,
    brown it, and throw it in a pot with vegetables and some chicken
    broth, black pepper, bay leaf, garlic, rosemary and thyme and bake it
    at 325 for a 2.5 hours or so, with the lid on.

    I sometimes make hassenpfeffer the way my German family used to by
    flouring pieces, browning in bacon grease and then cooking in a big
    deep skillet, adding the cooked bacon (about a half-pond), sauteed
    onion and garlic, chicken broth, spices as above, some red wine, a
    dash of vinegar and some honey or kayro syrup as sweetener. Leave the
    top off and let the sauce reduce. It needs to simmer a good 2 hours
    for the rabbit to be tender.

    -L.
     
  5. Melondy

    Melondy Guest

    -L. wrote:
    > Kathy-in-NZ wrote:
    >> Apparently hare and rabbit are two quite different meats. Rabbit is
    >> classed as a white meat, whereas hare is red.
    >>
    >> I suggest you look for a different recipe, though the one time I tried
    >> rabbit (roasted) I didn't like the slightly bitter taste of it. Maybe
    >> it too could benefit from marinating.

    >
    > Rabbit is extremely lean and needs to be braised. I basically oil it,
    > brown it, and throw it in a pot with vegetables and some chicken
    > broth, black pepper, bay leaf, garlic, rosemary and thyme and bake it
    > at 325 for a 2.5 hours or so, with the lid on.
    >
    > I sometimes make hassenpfeffer the way my German family used to by
    > flouring pieces, browning in bacon grease and then cooking in a big
    > deep skillet, adding the cooked bacon (about a half-pond), sauteed
    > onion and garlic, chicken broth, spices as above, some red wine, a
    > dash of vinegar and some honey or kayro syrup as sweetener. Leave the
    > top off and let the sauce reduce. It needs to simmer a good 2 hours
    > for the rabbit to be tender.
    >
    > -L.
    >


    It really depends on the age of the rabbit. Most domestic rabbit (as
    opposed to wild rabbit or hare) is butchered at a very young age.
    Definitely not a tough meat at all. It fries up like chicken very
    easily, in fact you can substitute almost any recipe for chicken to
    rabbit. Or pheasant. If you can find a bit older rabbit or a really
    large rabbit, then them make excellent braises and stews, especially
    with lots of onions and prunes in a beer sauce. Dollop of sour cream on
    top! Great meal, Or saute a rabbit with dried cherries and currant
    jelly. It goes great with fruit, though we've had a fun, tasty time
    using it in Mexican recipes and Chinese, too. But then again we used to
    raise rabbits and had access to LOTS of rabbit meat.

    Melondy
     
  6. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    ravenlynne <ravenlynne@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Thanks for the idea! There's a local butcher shop in montesanto that
    > has rabbit hanging in the window...I've wanted to try it and needed an
    > idea...


    Hare and rabbit are not even in the same universe. Hare is gamy and
    dark. Its one distinctive - and unpleasant - characteristic is the
    extreme dryness of the meat. Its taste is all of its own and is very
    distinctive indeed. Not a few people dislike it, even if they like
    other kinds of game. It is nothing like the relatively bland, but
    otherwise very pleasant, somewhat chicken-like rabbit - there is no
    resemblance at all. That said, it ought to be easy enough to find hare
    in Italy, frozen if not fresh. It is particularly popular in Tuscany,
    where they make the wonderful pappardelle sulla lepre (with the hare
    meat being cooked into a sauce, so dryness is not an issue), but even in
    other regions, Campania not excluded, it is popular enough. If you need
    recipes, hare or rabbit, just say so.

    Victor
     

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