Hershey buying Scharffen Berger Chocolate Co.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Leila, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Leila

    Leila Guest

    >From the SF Chronicle:

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/07/26/BUGM6DTAOM1.DTL

    "Scharffen Berger, a Berkeley company that specializes in premium dark
    chocolates, will continue making its products as normal but said it
    will have greater access to resources and growth opportunities by
    joining forces with Hershey.
    ....
    "Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    in high-end supermarkets."

    (quoted under fair use)

    Leila
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  3. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  4. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  5. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  6. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  7. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  8. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  9. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  10. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  11. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  12. In article <1122395549.931742.238520@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
    Leila <leila_abu-saba@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >"Scharffen Berger markets to the refined palate and seeks to be
    >approached like a fine wine. Its best-selling products include
    >bittersweet and extra-dark chocolates. The company has retail stores in
    >Berkeley, San Francisco and New York. Its products also are available
    >in high-end supermarkets."


    This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    claiming the high end of the market.

    I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    pleasant.

    It is also quite expensive.
    --
    David Arnstein
    arnstein+usenet@pobox.com
     
  13. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  14. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  15. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  16. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  17. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  18. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  19. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     
  20. David Arnstein wrote:

    > This gives me more confidence in my theory: Scharffen Berger is a
    > sham. Here they are, announcing that they are being acquired by the
    > king of mass market, low quality chocolate, and simultaneously
    > claiming the high end of the market.
    >
    > I've tasted their packaged goods many times, and I find them lacking.
    > The chocolate has a weird sour (not bitter) taste that is not
    > pleasant.
    >
    > It is also quite expensive.


    Yep. It doesn't hold a candle to Michel Cluizel or Valrhona. It's
    decidedly one-dimensional. It's the typical American thing -- some
    rich guys start a company in an area that interests them, learn as
    much as they can, and hang out a shingle. European chocolatiers
    have decades of experience, access to growers, etc. There's
    just no substitute for the kind of knowledge in depth that comes
    from growing up in what has been a hereditary craft.

    Of course, that's what's great about America -- you don't have to
    apprentice for seven years to become a sushi chef. OTOH that's
    what's not so great about America -- you eat sushi made by guys who
    didn't study for seven years to become a sushi chef.
     

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