Lower back pain

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by ghetto fobolous, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. ghetto fobolous

    ghetto fobolous New Member

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    I ride a mountain bike as a commuter bike... (Norco Scrambler) but I changed the regular mtb tires to hybrid-like tires w/ less tread. I'm in pretty good shape but I've noticed with longer rides I have a pain in my lower back. I read on the Internet that my frame might be too small for me... I'm 5'10" and 180lbs. What size frame should I be riding? Or should I get a road bike for commuting? The bike's still in great condition so I don't want to get another one already... Or would the seat have something to do with it? (which btw kinda hurts my ass too)

    Can ppl also provide some advice on riding posture?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. lumpy

    lumpy New Member

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    Have you been fitted to it by a bike shop?
    How's your abdominal strength and hamstring flexibility?

    You may not need a new bike, just some adjustments to it and perhaps you too.

    tim
     
  3. ghetto fobolous

    ghetto fobolous New Member

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    i'm starting to think it might not be my bike... just my core isn't strong enough. would i be able to develop my abs with just bike riding?
     
  4. Dr.Hairybiker

    Dr.Hairybiker New Member

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    I think some lower back pain is as common as some shoulder and elbow pain on the longer rides. Especially if you have worked out some and your upper body is heavier than the average cyclist. Something has to hold your upper body up......and it's the lower back, arms and shoulders that has to do the work. As you tire, those parts get more and more strained, just as your butt takes more abuse on longer rides as your legs tire and you don't stand as much. A very experienced cyclist typically has very developed legs and a smaller upper body, and can go longer without as much pain. Sure, you can change things around like the frame and the saddle, and it might help, but you're never gonna totally eliminate some pain as you get tired. Cycling ain't gonna build your abs, in my opinion. Do some sets of weighted sit-ups, in good form, for that.
     
  5. ghetto fobolous

    ghetto fobolous New Member

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    Will these pain go away with time as I ride more?

    It's not really long routes I'm riding... about 12km to work, and then another 12 back. Yesterday, I really felt it on the way home and my back was just straining so much it impaired my riding... I wanted to yell cuz I was in so much pain!! Are there exercises I should do at the gym? My legs are pretty strong, but maybe the upperbody needs some work... might look into core training. Maybe I should go back to my bike shop and ask about these things. I think when I bought my bike the size they said I needed was sold out, so I bought a slightly smaller one (24 instead of a 26?) Would this make a diff?

    Cheers. Thanks for the replies everyone. :)
     
  6. ianhargreaves

    ianhargreaves New Member

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    All of the above is top advice. Also don't just focus on your abdominals, look at the erector spinea, as it's name sugest it's keeps your spine erect. your abs at the front and the erector spinea at the back work as synergists to give you good posture. just work on the front or just the back and you're asking for real trouble. if you work one do the other. upper back exercises will help but focus on lower back. dead lifts and prone back hyper extensions for the erector spinea are good and for the abs work a combo of crunches, penguins, and the plank with the plank being the most life specific (this is only a few that can help there are many more).

    if your bike frame is too small and you set your seat up to optimal hight then your handle bars are going to be low, while this is more aerodynamic and good weight saver to have a small frame it's going it MAY cause some people with week backs some pain. I say if you bike just for commuting then you then sit in a more upright possition. This does not mean you have to set the handle bars higher than the seat but a little more closer may help you. If this or non of the above helps then go see a good physio, private or NHS (if you're from a country with a national health serice). These peeps are realy good and usualy can determin the problem and give and show you the exersice moves. Look in your local bookstore/library as the dummies books serise to back pain for dummies.
    http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-100149.html
    yeah sure they're geeky but they contain the info you need and is realy easy to read.

    P.S. Don't wear a weight belt for lifting weigths you start to neglect your back muscles. And used free weights instead of machine weights, standing or instead of using a weights bench then use a swiss ball.
     
  7. kayakado

    kayakado New Member

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    I purchased a new bike and experienced severe lower back pain after only a few miles of riding. The pain started on the ride and lingered for days. I had a professional fitting but it didn't seem to help. I had no such pain on my old bike and decided to compare the two. All the new measurements were almost identical to the old. I raised the new bike's seat post 3/4" and the pain stayed away for about 6-8 miles, but it was still there. I would get off and stretch every 5 miles or so. One other difference I noted was the seat. My old bike had a Brooks style leather seat. The new bike came with a Specialized Milano seat. I got rid of it and replaced it with a seat with more support and guess what? No back pain - even after 65 miles! I am now an advocate for dumping the comfort and gel seats after this torturuous experience. After all the adjustments are made - don't rule out trying other seats that at first glance will seem to be less comfortable.
     
  8. Lightspeed0001

    Lightspeed0001 New Member

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    I've had similar issues, all of which resolved with deep stretching.

    Ilio-tibial band work and yoga asanas seemed to reduce adhesions in my lower back, allowing the vertebrae to float properly, self-regulating positionally as they should do naturally.
    All this after I assumed that the issue was strength, when the truth of the matter was that I was too inflexible and not simply imbalanced or weak.

    Hope that helps. And by the way, initial forays into increased flexibility will not be without pain. Careful steady progress is the rule. Consult a reputable yoga practitioner for further.

    J.St.Germain
     
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