Mongoose disc brake conversion?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dansciol, May 22, 2007.

  1. dansciol

    dansciol New Member

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    Hello, This is my first post. I just bought an 07 mongoose crossway 250. Probably not up to par with the bikes you guys ride, but I am inquiring about disc brake conversion.
    Is there a kit available for this bike? Or is it not worth it on a bike like this?

    Also I was looking to buy replacement mongoose parts online, and couldnt come up with any sites. I need to replace one of the front brake spring tension adjusting screws, that is if I dont switch to disc. Are there sites where you can plug in your bike model, and find parts available?
    I am comming from the automotive field where you can find parts diagrams, and select and order the part you need for that particular model, is this possible with bikes?

    Thanks for any help you can provide.
    -Dan
     
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  2. 1id10t

    1id10t New Member

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    It's really entirely up to you whether you think it''s worth the upgrade to disc brakes or not. The main thing is to ensure your forks have disc brake mounts as does your frame. Next thing, try to buy the best disk brakes you can afford. At the least look at something like Avid BB5 or BB7 mechanical, maybe Hayes MX mechanical ones. Tektro's are usually frowned upon. I had them for a short while on one of my bikes and they worked fine for commuting purposes. Squealed like a banshee, was a mongrel to adjust and felt spongy but did the job until I could upgrade.

    What parts are you after. There are plenty of third party products you can buy which do the job equally if not better than some original parts. Depends on the brand and product. As far as the spring tension adjuster screw is concerned I would approach your lbs (local bike shop) or the shop you bought the bike from and speak to them. They might even give you one if they have any spares. At times where I've needed a really small part or I've needed a really quick and easy repair I couldn't accomplish at home my lbs has just either given the part to me at no cost or performed the repair free. Build up a rapport with them; it might work to your advantage (and theirs).
    Don't know about any online resources where you could just plug in part numbers. You'd probably only find these from the actual manufacturers site (if you're lucky).
    Otherwise, ride the bike as it is and enjoy it. If you're anything like many of the members here you'll find yourself on the upgrade path with a stable of bikes and a garage full of spares
    :D :eek:
     
  3. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    Retrofitting disc brakes can be a pricy proposition.

    IF your bike happens to have caliper mounts on the fork and rear triangle, you will still need a new wheelset in addition to the disc brakes. Routing the brake cable to the rear brake can be an issue too.
     
  4. 1id10t

    1id10t New Member

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    Thanks RetroGrouch
    I'd completely forgotten about needing a new wheelset as well...Doh!!
     
  5. dansciol

    dansciol New Member

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    Thanks for the info guys, looks like I will stick with the regular brakes. The cost of new wheels, and the brakes would probably total more than the bike's worth.

    I made a stop at my LBS, and they sold me a new shimano front brake, since they didnt have the single part I needed. It installed like the orignal, so I'm ready to roll.
     
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