mtb question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by stan, Dec 26, 2006.

  1. stan

    stan Guest

    hi folks,

    have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    again,

    while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read

    " the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"

    I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so

    1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    ...... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    using bar ends?

    2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better

    thanks for any enlightenment

    Stan
     
    Tags:


  2. Per stan:
    >
    >" the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    >racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    >I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so


    I use risers with bar ends.

    Maybe somebody who knows more can comment, but I can't see the diff between
    risers with bar ends and flats w/bar ends except that with risers I can tune my
    cockpit length a little by tilting the risers fore or aft.
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  3. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 01:08:12 GMT, stan <stanandsue2000@yahoo.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >hi folks,
    >
    >have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    >late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    >again,
    >
    >while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read
    >
    >" the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    >racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    >I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so
    >
    >1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    >permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    >aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    >..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    >using bar ends?
    >
    >2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    >rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    >the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better
    >
    >thanks for any enlightenment


    From what I've seen, in part, the proliferation of riser bars reflects
    the widespread failure of the marketplace to supply adequate numbers
    of stems with sufficient rise, as well as the tendency of bike makers
    to cut the steerers too short. If a bike has been retrofitted with
    riser bars (and yes, sometimes those risers will have bar ends
    installed), there's a good chance that the owner couldn't find a stem
    that provided enough elevation.

    This doesn't explain the presence of risers on new bikes, however. In
    that market, the only likely explanation is "it's a styling choice".
    Some people like the looks of the riser bars. Frankly, I prefer flat
    bars, in part because it's a lot easier to mount lights and such when
    you have more level pipe available...but when one of the bikes I was
    building came up needing more bar elevation than I was going to get
    with the stems I could buy locally, I swapped on a riser bar instead.
    Try finding a 1 1/8" stem with a 135 degree angle and 140mm length.
    With riser bars, the same effective grip location can be obtained with
    stems that are common. The down side, as mentioned, is the lack of
    pipe suitable for mounting accessories.

    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  4. stan wrote:
    > hi folks,
    >
    > have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    > late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    > again,
    >
    > while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read
    >
    > " the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    > racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    > I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so
    >
    > 1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    > permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    > aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    > ..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    > using bar ends?
    >
    > 2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    > rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    > the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better
    >
    > thanks for any enlightenment
    >
    > Stan


    DON'T be swayed by magazines and bike shop pundits. Use what you wish,
    what you like. If ya like barends, and a flat bar, use them, Still 'out
    there'. LOTS of style and fashion points to be had at the coffee shop
    in bicycles these days, both road and MTB.
     
  5. "stan" <stanandsue2000@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:uah3p2dqmjj2vu7ggpqo1purm1oh7542ad@4ax.com...
    >
    > hi folks,
    >
    > have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    > late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    > again,
    >
    > while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read
    >
    > " the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    > racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    > I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so
    >
    > 1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    > permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    > aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    > ..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    > using bar ends?
    >
    > 2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    > rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    > the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better
    >
    > thanks for any enlightenment
    >
    > Stan
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


    It came on as a fad with all the "freeride" and "all mountain" rigs, as
    higher bar height makes downhilling feel a little more secure, not to
    mention make bicycles look more and more like motocross bikes. You are
    right, there shouldn't be any difference between a rise bar and a flat bar
    with a higher stem. Riser bar also limits useable space on the bar for
    attaching lights, computers, etc. I've never liked riser bars all my mtbs
    have flatbars with or without barends. Barends come in handy when climbing
    as they give you better pull leverage.
     
  6. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    stan wrote:
    > hi folks,
    >
    > have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    > late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    > again,
    >
    > while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read
    >
    > " the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    > racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    > I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so
    >
    > 1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    > permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    > aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    > ..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    > using bar ends?
    >
    > 2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    > rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    > the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better
    >
    > thanks for any enlightenment
    >
    > Stan
    >


    1. as stated by another poster, they provide a marginally better
    position for steep downhills - need to keep c.g. rearwards. you can
    adjust all this with stems of course, but with mtb's [unlike road bikes]
    you want to keep the frame relatively small and low and there comes a
    point where mechanical reliability [fatigue] of funky stems and spacers
    are not too good.

    2. they're usually longer - which gives a little more control on the
    sketchy stuff. as with some other things in life, longer can be better.

    do they save the planet? no. can you still ride a bike with flats?
    sure - that's why they're still sold! but can they help a little?
    absolutely. however, feel free not to use them if you don't want to.
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    stan wrote:

    > 1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    > permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    > aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    > ..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    > using bar ends?


    My first bike came with them, so I used them for a while. I found that I
    didn't use them as I often needed to use brakes even on climbs and They
    had a tendency to grab foliage, so I took them off and never looked
    back. I think the (un)usefulness has everything to do with the kind of
    riding you do. I do east coast singletrack -- lots of foliage, glaciated
    terrain (lots of short, steep, rocky climbs).


    > 2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    > rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    > the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better


    I have them on one MTB, not on the other. Easy way to get a couple of
    inches more bar height if you need it, can make mounting lights more of
    an issue.
     
  8. Marian

    Marian Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:

    > This doesn't explain the presence of risers on new bikes, however. In
    > that market, the only likely explanation is "it's a styling choice".
    > Some people like the looks of the riser bars. Frankly, I prefer flat
    > bars, in part because it's a lot easier to mount lights and such when
    > you have more level pipe available...but when one of the bikes I was
    > building came up needing more bar elevation than I was going to get
    > with the stems I could buy locally, I swapped on a riser bar instead.
    > Try finding a 1 1/8" stem with a 135 degree angle and 140mm length.
    > With riser bars, the same effective grip location can be obtained with
    > stems that are common. The down side, as mentioned, is the lack of
    > pipe suitable for mounting accessories.


    Because my current mountain bike is too big for me (but you don't turn
    down a 2nd hand Cannondale at that price) I have a shorter than normal
    stem and riser bars. Its the only way to get the bars high enough
    while keeping the reach short enough.

    -M
     
  9. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    stan wrote:
    > hi folks,
    >
    > have a mtb question for you, i was very much into the mtb scene in the
    > late 80's and have missed it for a bunch of years and just playing
    > again,
    >
    > while rereading the sept issue of mbaction i read
    >
    > " the wide acceptance of riser bars by trail riders and cross-country
    > racers signaled the end of the bar ends widespread use"
    >
    > I don't understand this as I always liked flat bars with bar ends, so
    >
    > 1) the purpose of bar ends was to provide an alternate hand holds to
    > permit changing hand positions on long rides to prevent numbness and
    > aches and they also provided a better position for hill climbing,
    > ..... so riser bars don't do either ... yet I don't see many folks
    > using bar ends?
    >
    > 2) i don't see much difference between using a riser bar with a lower
    > rise stem ... and using a flat bar with a higher rise stem, so what's
    > the big deal? I guess I always though flat bars looked better
    >
    > thanks for any enlightenment
    >
    > Stan


    Nothing wrong with using flat bars and bar ends, they still make a lot
    of sense in some situations. Some of the trails here in the midwest
    have closely spaced trees that make the shorter length of most flat
    bars desirable.

    Smokey
     
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