My first corned beef

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ginny Sher, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. Ginny Sher

    Ginny Sher Guest

    Right before St. Patricks day, my local supermarket was offering
    corned beef brisket for a ridiculously low price, so I bought 3 and
    froze them. Someone in another thread mentioned they didn't freeze
    well, so I was a little concerned. Oh well... the deed was done.

    A few days ago, I defrosted one of the briskets and put it in the
    crock pot with enough water to make it float. I added the spice
    packet it came with (because I like mustard seed) and also added some
    pickling spice that I recently bought from Penzey's specifically for
    this meat. It took a lot longer than I expected (about 7 hours), but
    we had it for dinner that night along with some stir fried cabbage. I
    don't like steamed cabbage, but I really enjoy stir fried with Asian
    condiments. It was really tasty. My only disappointment came in
    slicing it. Of course, I sliced across the grain, but several times
    bits of stringy meat broke off from the slice. It wasn't that big a
    deal, but I wonder if that had anything to do with it being frozen
    beforehand? Oh... and how do you all handle the layer of fat? I tried
    to slice it off, but close to the meat, it got mushy and gross.

    Ginny
     
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  2. Dawn

    Dawn Guest

    Ginny Sher wrote:

    > Right before St. Patricks day, my local supermarket was offering
    > corned beef brisket for a ridiculously low price, so I bought 3 and
    > froze them. Someone in another thread mentioned they didn't freeze
    > well, so I was a little concerned. Oh well... the deed was done.


    Nope, they freeze fine. I buy 8 or 10 of them on sale and bring them out
    throughout the year, sometimes just cook 'em up for cold sandwiches.

    >
    > I sliced across the grain, but several times
    > bits of stringy meat broke off from the slice. It wasn't that big a
    > deal, but I wonder if that had anything to do with it being frozen
    > beforehand?


    Nope. Corned beef is just like that, when it gets tender it practically
    falls apart. Sometimes I just give up and get a big spoon.


    >Oh... and how do you all handle the layer of fat? I tried
    > to slice it off, but close to the meat, it got mushy and gross.
    >


    I pull the brisket out of the water when it is done and put it on a big
    tray and use the back side of a big knife to scrape the fat off. It is
    mushy and gross. Just keep scraping. Sometimes you have a layer of fat
    in between two pieces of meat, it's ok to separate them to get the fat
    out. Then throw the fat out, put the beef back in the liquid to keep it
    from drying out, and then when you're ready to serve you pull out a nice
    lean brisket for the guests to enjoy.


    Dawn
     
  3. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    Ginny Sher wrote:


    >I sliced across the grain, but several times
    > bits of stringy meat broke off from the slice. It wasn't that big a
    > deal, but I wonder if that had anything to do with it being frozen
    > beforehand?


    do you have a really sharp knife? i can tell when my knives are getting dull.
    there's a lot more sawing and a lot less cutting going on.
     
  4. Jim Davis

    Jim Davis Guest

    Interesting. I was just cruising to find out about ways to cook it
    other than the traditional cabbage. Would like to try to use like Texas
    BBQ brisket. Found today that the local market had it on sale for
    99cents a lb so I bought a bunch and threw in the freezer.

    Dawn wrote:

    > Ginny Sher wrote:
    >
    >> Right before St. Patricks day, my local supermarket was offering
    >> corned beef brisket for a ridiculously low price, so I bought 3 and
    >> froze them. Someone in another thread mentioned they didn't freeze
    >> well, so I was a little concerned. Oh well... the deed was done.

    >
    >
    > Nope, they freeze fine. I buy 8 or 10 of them on sale and bring them
    > out throughout the year, sometimes just cook 'em up for cold sandwiches.
    >
    >>
    >> I sliced across the grain, but several times
    >> bits of stringy meat broke off from the slice. It wasn't that big a
    >> deal, but I wonder if that had anything to do with it being frozen
    >> beforehand?

    >
    >
    > Nope. Corned beef is just like that, when it gets tender it
    > practically falls apart. Sometimes I just give up and get a big spoon.
    >
    >
    >> Oh... and how do you all handle the layer of fat? I tried
    >> to slice it off, but close to the meat, it got mushy and gross.
    >>

    >
    > I pull the brisket out of the water when it is done and put it on a
    > big tray and use the back side of a big knife to scrape the fat off.
    > It is mushy and gross. Just keep scraping. Sometimes you have a layer
    > of fat in between two pieces of meat, it's ok to separate them to get
    > the fat out. Then throw the fat out, put the beef back in the liquid
    > to keep it from drying out, and then when you're ready to serve you
    > pull out a nice lean brisket for the guests to enjoy.
    >
    >
    > Dawn
     
  5. "Jim Davis" <jimdavis1937@netscape.net> wrote in message
    news:117371cm1845taa@corp.supernews.com...
    > Interesting. I was just cruising to find out about ways to cook it other
    > than the traditional cabbage. Would like to try to use like Texas BBQ
    > brisket. Found today that the local market had it on sale for 99cents a
    > lb so I bought a bunch and threw in the freezer.
    >


    If you use a corned beef it would be more like Pastrami than bbq brisket as
    bbq is not cured.
     

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