Phobile Moans from a Lakeland MRT

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Bootlaces, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Bootlaces

    Bootlaces Guest

    From today's Times 2...

    From life-savers to nannies.

    <quote>
    The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    </>

    <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>

    --
    He who laughs last thinks slowest.
     
    Tags:


  2. "Bootlaces" <bootlaces@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:tf5okhw1yrv5$.dlg@ID-177711.user.individual.net...
    > From today's Times 2...
    >
    > From life-savers to nannies.
    >
    > <quote>
    > The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    > mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    > said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    > find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    > incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    > have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    > </>
    >
    > <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>
    >
    > --
    > He who laughs last thinks slowest.


    They should have taken Stag Chilli!
     
  3. Ysgrifennodd "Bootlaces" <bootlaces@hotmail.com> mewn neges
    newyddion:tf5okhw1yrv5$.dlg@ID-177711.user.individual.net...
    > From today's Times 2...
    >
    > From life-savers to nannies.
    >
    > <quote>
    > The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    > mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    > said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    > find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    > incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    > have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    > </>
    >
    > <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>
    >
    > --
    > He who laughs last thinks slowest.


    Just read the entire article.
    I can't believe that the people could be so *stupid* as to phone MR up to
    give them a "lift" back to base.
    I also cannot believe how MR can't just leave people like this (possibly on
    the road) and get them to phone for their own taxi.
    Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe?

    I'll stop now, before i really start ranting about these selfish. stupid
    F%^$^ idiots !!!

    T.Dave R
     
  4. Bootlaces wrote:

    > From today's Times 2...
    >
    > From life-savers to nannies.
    >
    > <quote>
    > The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    > mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    > said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    > find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    > incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    > have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    > </>
    >
    > <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>


    By the very nature of their role the MRTs only see the people who
    genuinely need help, and the truly stupid ones. I think it's dangerous
    to draw national conclusions based on LAMRT which has a fairly unique
    area in terms of visitor profile and popularity. Looking at the call
    out records for LAMRT in 2004 (http://www.lamrt.org.uk/incidents04.html)
    only reveals one incident in the 110 they attended that year where a
    mobile was used completely inappropriately, so by their own figures more
    than 99% of the time being able to summon help quickly via a mobile
    would have saved people from suffering unnecessary pain and further injury.

    As for the increase in rescues, a quick google found the Keswick MRT
    callout records, as just one example
    (http://www.keswickmrt.org.uk/rescues/rescues.html) and in their case
    the number of callouts has actually declined over the last couple of
    years after a long steady increase over the last several decades.
    Reading their call out log for 2004
    (http://www.keswickmrt.org.uk/rescues/2004.html) doesn't reveal any 'I'm
    late for a date' callouts last year as far as I can tell.

    I've seen this complaint about mobile phones before, it does seems to be
    a bit of a recurring theme. My experience would suggest that a very
    large proportion of people who get "misplaced" manage to get themselves
    off safely, and the MRTs never become aware of them at all. I think
    that it's far to say that the vast number of that those who call for
    help genuinely need it, and saying that they shouldn't be able to use a
    mobile phone to do so seems a little nonsensical.

    --
    Alan Burlison
    --
     
  5. Fran

    Fran Guest

    bootlaces@hotmail.com said...
    > As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    > incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    > have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    > </>
    >

    Speechless.

    --
    If you can keep your head when all around are losing theirs...
    then you've failed to grasp some important aspect of the
    situation.
     
  6. Dafydd Ap Arwyn wrote:

    > Just read the entire article.
    > I can't believe that the people could be so *stupid* as to phone MR up to
    > give them a "lift" back to base.
    > I also cannot believe how MR can't just leave people like this (possibly on
    > the road) and get them to phone for their own taxi.
    > Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    > Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe?
    >
    > I'll stop now, before i really start ranting about these selfish. stupid
    > F%^$^ idiots !!!


    Unfortunately stupidity and inconsiderate behaviour are neither illegal
    nor particularly uncommon - what makes you think that people will behave
    any differently when they are on the hill? I bet the
    ambulance/fire/police service folks can tell *far* worse stories than that!

    http://www.avonandsomerset.police.uk/communications/examples_of_999_calls.asp?cm=41

    --
    Alan Burlison
    --
     
  7. JeffC

    JeffC Guest

    "Bootlaces" <bootlaces@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:tf5okhw1yrv5$.dlg@ID-177711.user.individual.net...
    > From today's Times 2...
    >
    > From life-savers to nannies.
    >
    > <quote>
    > The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    > mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    > said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    > find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    > incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    > have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    > </>
    >
    > <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>
    >
    > --
    > He who laughs last thinks slowest.


    This old chestnut again!, I wish I had a £1 for every time I've heard this
    one. You'd have thought The Times would have had something more topical to
    print........or maybe not!


    --
    astrecks(at)yahooyourbrain(dot)com (remove your brain to reply)

    http://www.astrecks.co.uk
    Always look on the bright side of life (De do, de do, de doody doody do)
     
  8. John Gardner

    John Gardner Guest

    >Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    >Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe


    We were once called out for a 4x4 which had got itself stuck on Mastiles Lane.
    We invited them to make a donation to the team, but they declined so we gave
    them the phone number of the local breakdown garage.

    John
    ---
    John Gardner
    Caving Routes in the Northern Pennines: http://braemoor.co.uk/cavingtrip
    A Walking Guide to Chartreuse: http://braemoor.co.uk/chartreuse
     
  9. Magic Rat

    Magic Rat Guest

    Agree with JeffC, I'm sure I heard this story at least 5 years ago, or
    it must have been one VERY similar.
     
  10. In article <ct6ev4$b5s$1@news.freedom2surf.net>, Dafydd Ap Arwyn
    <daveroberts@f2s.com> writes
    >Ysgrifennodd "Bootlaces" <bootlaces@hotmail.com> mewn neges
    >newyddion:tf5okhw1yrv5$.dlg@ID-177711.user.individual.net...
    >> From today's Times 2...
    >>
    >> From life-savers to nannies.
    >>
    >> <quote>
    >> The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    >> mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    >> said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    >> find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    >> incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    >> have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    >> </>
    >>
    >> <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>
    >>
    >> --
    >> He who laughs last thinks slowest.

    >
    >Just read the entire article.
    >I can't believe that the people could be so *stupid* as to phone MR up to
    >give them a "lift" back to base.
    >I also cannot believe how MR can't just leave people like this (possibly on
    >the road) and get them to phone for their own taxi.
    >Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    >Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe?
    >
    >I'll stop now, before i really start ranting about these selfish. stupid
    >F%^$^ idiots !!!
    >


    I expect that the MR team leader faced with a situation like this where
    the person calling is obviously not competent would err on the side of
    caution and get the fools off the hill. Otherwise they may well get
    another call later on and have a far more serious incident to deal with
    at a less sociable hour :(

    --

    Dominic Sexton
     
  11. Fran

    Fran Guest

    paddingtun@aol.com said...
    > >Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    > >Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe

    >
    > We were once called out for a 4x4 which had got itself stuck on Mastiles Lane.
    > We invited them to make a donation to the team, but they declined so we gave
    > them the phone number of the local breakdown garage.


    Good for you. I reckon that if people aren't at least
    appreciative of your efforts then as long as they aren't in
    any danger you should leave them there. If there's any danger
    you should lead them to safety - and then leave them.
    --
    If you can keep your head when all around are losing theirs...
    then you've failed to grasp some important aspect of the
    situation.
     
  12. JeffC <astrecks@yahooyourbrain.com> writes
    >
    >This old chestnut again!, I wish I had a £1 for every time I've heard this
    >one. You'd have thought The Times would have had something more topical to
    >print........or maybe not!
    >

    I heard an interview with a MRT member on R4 (PM) last evening. It
    mighty be "listen-again", but I missed part of it.

    He was very scathing about this particular case, but went on to say that
    the type of incident prevented them from attending people who were
    injured, which might be true on a busy Sunday, I suppose.
    The couple were not hurt in any way, but of course anyone can experience
    the rapid closing in of weather, possibly when they were stretching
    their experience beyond an easy stroll.

    Having said that, I would be totally embarrassed to call them for any
    reason other than injury or illness. For this reason, and my age, I
    tend to walk well within my physical and navigational limits nowadays.
    --
    Gordon Harris
     
  13. Gordon Harris wrote:

    > Having said that, I would be totally embarrassed to call them for any


    > reason other than injury or illness. For this reason, and my

    age, I
    > tend to walk well within my physical and navigational limits

    nowadays.
    Lounge -> Kitchen -> Lounge -> Toilet -> Lounge .....

    ;-)

    Chris
     
  14. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On 26 Jan 2005 06:37:09 -0800, Chris Gilbert wrote:

    >
    >Gordon Harris wrote:
    >
    >> Having said that, I would be totally embarrassed to call them for any

    >
    >> reason other than injury or illness. For this reason, and my

    >age, I
    >> tend to walk well within my physical and navigational limits

    >nowadays.
    >Lounge -> Kitchen


    You missed a bit out...

    -> Fridge -> Drawer (bottle opener) -> Cupboard (glass)
    -> Lounge -> Toilet -> Lounge .....
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  15. Ysgrifennodd "Alan Burlison (wrote) " <alan@dontspamme.bleaklow.com> mewn
    neges newyddion:ct6ipj$c77$1@hercules.btinternet.com...

    > Unfortunately stupidity and inconsiderate behaviour are neither illegal
    > nor particularly uncommon - what makes you think that people will behave
    > any differently when they are on the hill?


    To be honest, I don't expect it. In the society of today people expect
    things *now*.
    Same with hills, they dont want to learn skills that might save their life,
    waste of time.
    I was mainly curious as to why the MRT didn't just dump them on the road,
    they already
    had a phone to ring for a taxi, is it some sort of rule they follow?

    > I bet the ambulance/fire/police service folks can tell *far* worse stories
    > than that!


    Read the link...
    The oneabout the taxi sounds about right for the MRT above.
    The rest though? Are they for real?!

    T Dave R.
     
  16. Ysgrifennodd "John Gardner" <paddingtun@aol.com> mewn neges
    newyddion:20050126023418.04956.00000248@mb-m25.aol.com...
    > >Is there some sort of code or conduct the MRTs have that prevent this?
    >>Surely all they must do is ensure a group is safe

    >
    > We were once called out for a 4x4 which had got itself stuck on Mastiles
    > Lane.
    > We invited them to make a donation to the team, but they declined so we
    > gave
    > them the phone number of the local breakdown garage.


    That's what i like to hear!
    nice one!

    T Dave R
     
  17. Bootlaces

    Bootlaces Guest

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 22:00:07 +0000 (UTC)
    in <news:ct6fh6$ari$1@titan.btinternet.com>
    Alan Burlison (Alan Burlison <alan@dontspamme.bleaklow.com>) wrote :

    > Bootlaces wrote:
    >
    >> From today's Times 2...
    >>
    >> From life-savers to nannies.

    <snip>
    >> <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7-1454604,00.html>

    >
    > By the very nature of their role the MRTs only see the people who
    > genuinely need help, and the truly stupid ones. I think it's dangerous
    > to draw national conclusions based on LAMRT which has a fairly unique
    > area in terms of visitor profile and popularity.


    Well the article does state that they receive more callouts per annum
    than the whole of Scotland.

    > Looking at the call
    > out records for LAMRT in 2004 (http://www.lamrt.org.uk/incidents04.html)
    > only reveals one incident in the 110 they attended that year where a
    > mobile was used completely inappropriately, so by their own figures more
    > than 99% of the time being able to summon help quickly via a mobile
    > would have saved people from suffering unnecessary pain and further injury.


    Mr. Hulse (team leader of LAMRT, who is the focus of the article) seems
    to have strong opinions...

    <quote> (from the article)
    "One of the main reasons for mountain rescue being called out is people
    being lost on the fells in mist and overcome by darkness. If these
    so-called fellwalkers had carried a torch, compass and map or a GPS then
    I'm convinced the majority of people we nanny off the fells would have
    no need of our assistance."
    </>

    --
    Chocolate has many preservatives.
    Preservatives make you look younger.
     
  18. On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 18:38:35 +0000, in uk.rec.walking you wrote:

    >From today's Times 2...
    >
    >From life-savers to nannies.
    >
    ><quote>
    >The distress call from the mobile phone of a couple stranded up a
    >mountain in the Lake District sounded serious. "We are lost in mist,"
    >said the anxious voice. "My wife is very frightened. Please come and
    >find us." As the message continued, the mountain rescue team listened
    >incredulously. "And could you send a helicopter?" asked the caller. "We
    >have a dinner date at 7pm which we really don't want to miss."
    ></>
    >


    They interviewed the MRT guy on PM (Radio4) this evening too. He
    repeated the above anecdote and also suggested that having a torch and
    knowing how to use it (???) was much more useful. Then some moron
    texted the BBC saying what good would a torch be if you had a broken
    leg...

    --
    York Alpine Club - http://www.yorkalpineclub.org.uk
    Recent Photos - http://climbing.me.uk
    Old Photos - http://www.simon-caldwell.co.uk
    My Brother's Photos - http://www.caldwellcreations.co.uk
     
  19. Bitstring <eba8f8n57nk9.dlg@ID-177711.user.individual.net>, from the
    wonderful person Bootlaces <bootlaces@hotmail.com> said
    <snip>
    >Mr. Hulse (team leader of LAMRT, who is the focus of the article) seems
    >to have strong opinions...
    >
    ><quote> (from the article)
    >"One of the main reasons for mountain rescue being called out is people
    >being lost on the fells in mist and overcome by darkness. If these
    >so-called fellwalkers had carried a torch, compass and map or a GPS then
    >I'm convinced the majority of people we nanny off the fells would have
    >no need of our assistance."


    Sounds pretty reasonable to me. Some folks seem to set out with not much
    of clue when it will even get dark, or how many miles an hour they can
    expect to cover.

    Me, I'm all for leaving most of them up there, under the 'evolution in
    action' banner. 8>.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Outgoing Msgs are Turing Tested,and indistinguishable from human typing.
     
  20. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 22:10:14 +0000, Simon Caldwell
    <simonjcaldwell@ntlworld.com> wrote:

    >They interviewed the MRT guy on PM (Radio4) this evening too. He
    >repeated the above anecdote and also suggested that having a torch and
    >knowing how to use it (???) was much more useful. Then some moron
    >texted the BBC saying what good would a torch be if you had a broken
    >leg...


    Er, let's see:

    - Improve morale
    - If a very long torch, make a splint
    - Shine light to attract attention
    - Club dangerous beasties
    - Club stupid moron over head?

    Judith
     

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