Re: AHA on margarine

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by MMu, Jun 10, 2005.

  1. MMu

    MMu Guest

    "Enrico C" <use_replyto_address@despammed.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:14ugr3cfpmnpo$.dlg@news.lillathedog.net...
    >
    > I don't understand why on earth the American Heart Association web site
    > recommends:
    >
    > "Use margarine as a substitute for butter...".
    >
    > even if
    >
    > "In clinical studies, trans fatty acids or hydrogenated fats tend to raise
    > total blood cholesterol levels and LDL ("bad") cholesterol and lower HDL
    > ("good") cholesterol when used instead of cis fatty acids or natural oils.
    > These changes may increase the risk of heart disease."


    you you aware that butter contains trans fats as well?

    >
    > Why don't they just recommend olive oil instead of butter (in most cases)?
    >


    because olive oil and honey doesn't go so well on your breakfast bread.

    >
    > Here is the complete AHA recommendation I am referring to.
    >
    > http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4776
    >
    > =========
    > Trans Fatty Acids, Butter and Margarine
    >
    > Is butter better than margarine?
    >
    > Studies on the potential cholesterol-raising effects of trans fatty acids
    > have raised public concern about using margarine and whether other
    > options,
    > such as using butter (despite its high level of saturated fat and
    > cholesterol), might be better choices. Some stick margarines contribute
    > more trans fatty acids than unhydrogenated (HI'dro-jen-a-tid or
    > hi-DROJ'en-a-tid) oils or other fats.
    >
    > While studies have shown that using margarine can lower LDL ("bad")
    > cholesterol when compared with butter, trans fatty acids can raise LDL and
    > lower HLD ("good") cholesterol.
    >
    > AHA Recommendation
    >
    > Butter is rich in both saturated fat and cholesterol, so it's potentially
    > highly atherogenic (ATH'er-o-JEN'ik). That means it contributes to the
    > build up of cholesterol and other substances in artery walls. Such plaque
    > deposits increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.
    >
    > Most margarine is made from vegetable fat and provides no dietary
    > cholesterol. The more liquid the margarine (in tub or liquid form), the
    > less hydrogenated it is and the less trans fatty acids it contains. On the
    > basis of current data, we recommend that consumers follow these tips:
    >
    > * Use naturally occurring, unhydrogenated oil such as canola or olive
    > oil when possible.
    > * Look for processed foods made with unhydrogenated oil rather than
    > hydrogenated oil or saturated fat.
    > * Use margarine as a substitute for butter, and choose soft (liquid or
    > tub) margarines over harder, stick forms. Use margarine with no more than
    > 2
    > grams of saturated fat per tablespoon and with liquid vegetable oil as the
    > first ingredient.
    >
    > The American Heart Association's Nutrition Committee strongly advises that
    > healthy Americans over age 2 limit their intake of saturated fat and trans
    > fat to less than 10 percent of total calories. Healthy people should
    > adjust
    > their total fat intake to match their energy expenditure so they don't
    > gain
    > weight. To lose weight, it's helpful to limit total fat to no more than
    > 30
    > percent of calories.
    >
    > Minimize trans fat intake. If you limit your daily intake of fats and oils
    > to 5-8 teaspoons, you aren't likely to get an excess of trans fatty acids.
    > The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring that food
    > manufacturers
    > list trans fat on food labels so it will be easier for consumers to avoid
    > trans fats. Manufacturers have until January 1, 2006 to comply.
    >
    > What are fatty acids?
    >
    > Fats and oils are mixtures of fatty acids. Each fat or oil is designated
    > "saturated," "monounsaturated" or "polyunsaturated," depending on what
    > type
    > of fatty acid predominates.
    >
    > * Saturated fatty acids have all the hydrogen the carbon atoms can
    > hold. Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperature, and they're
    > more stable -- that is, they don't combine readily with oxygen and turn
    > rancid. Saturated fatty acids raise blood cholesterol, which raises the
    > risk of coronary heart disease and stroke.
    >
    > * Monounsaturated fatty acids have only one unsaturated bond.
    > Monounsaturated oils are liquid at room temperature but start to solidify
    > at refrigerator temperatures. For example, salad dressing containing olive
    > oil turns cloudy when refrigerated but is clear at room temperature.
    > Monounsaturated fatty acids seem to lower blood cholesterol when
    > substituted for saturated fats.
    >
    > * Polyunsaturated fatty acids have more than one unsaturated bond.
    > Polyunsaturated oils, which contain mostly polyunsaturated fatty acids,
    > are
    > liquid at room temperature and in the refrigerator. They easily combine
    > with oxygen in the air to become rancid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids help
    > lower total blood cholesterol when substituted for saturated fats.
    >
    > In addition, dietary cholesterol found in animal fats also raises total
    > blood cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol.
    >
    > What are trans fatty acids and where do they come from?
    >
    > A fatty acid molecule consists of a chain of carbon atoms in carbon-carbon
    > double bonds with hydrogen atoms "attached." In nature most unsaturated
    > fatty acids are cis fatty acids. This means that the hydrogen atoms are on
    > the same side of the double carbon bond. In trans fatty acids the two
    > hydrogen atoms are on opposite sides of the double bond.
    >
    > Trans double bonds can occur in nature as the result of fermentation in
    > grazing animals. People eat them in the form of meat and dairy products.
    >
    > Trans double bonds are also formed during the hydrogenation
    > (hi"dro-jen-A'shun or hi-DROJ'en-a"shun) of either vegetable or fish oils.
    > French fries, donuts, cookies, chips and other snack foods are high in
    > trans fatty acids. In fact, nearly all fried or baked goods have some
    > trans
    > fats.
    >
    > How does hydrogenation create trans fatty acids?
    >
    > To help foods stay fresh on the shelf or to get a solid fat product, such
    > as margarine, food manufacturers hydrogenate polyunsaturated oils.
    > Hydrogenate means to add hydrogen.
    >
    > How are trans fatty acids harmful?
    >
    > In clinical studies, trans fatty acids or hydrogenated fats tend to raise
    > total blood cholesterol levels and LDL ("bad") cholesterol and lower HDL
    > ("good") cholesterol when used instead of cis fatty acids or natural oils.
    > These changes may increase the risk of heart disease. It's not clear if
    > trans fats that occur naturally have the same effect on cholesterol and
    > heart disease as those produced by hydrogenating vegetable oils.
    >
    > ======
     
    Tags:


  2. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 10:20:58 +0200, MMu wrote in
    <news:42a94dae$0$12384$3b214f66@usenet.univie.ac.at> on sci.med.nutrition :

    >> Why don't they just recommend olive oil instead of butter (in most cases)?
    >>

    >
    > because olive oil and honey doesn't go so well on your breakfast bread.


    I know. :)
    That's why I added "in most cases". I was just thinking of that.

    I doubt spreads taste as good as butter though.
    On bread, I prefer a smaller amount of the real thing, butter.
    Then, I don't eat bread and butter everyday.

    With all other foods, I use uncooked olive oil.

    What strikes me is that AHA doesn't even mention olive oil.

    And they don't mention nichel in margarines.

    --
    Enrico C
    ==================================
     
  3. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    MMu wrote:
    :: "Enrico C" <use_replyto_address@despammed.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    :: news:14ugr3cfpmnpo$.dlg@news.lillathedog.net...

    ::: Why don't they just recommend olive oil instead of butter (in most
    ::: cases)?
    :::
    :: because olive oil and honey doesn't go so well on your breakfast
    :: bread.

    Actually it is a cultural thing - what you get used to. In most of the
    Mediterranean countries people manages amazingly well even without margarine
    or butter. They use mostly olive oil with bread.

    --
    Juhana
     
  4. Jim Chinnis

    Jim Chinnis Guest

    Enrico C <use_replyto_address@despammed.com> wrote in part:

    >On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 10:20:58 +0200, MMu wrote in
    ><news:42a94dae$0$12384$3b214f66@usenet.univie.ac.at> on sci.med.nutrition :
    >
    >>> Why don't they just recommend olive oil instead of butter (in most cases)?
    >>>

    >>
    >> because olive oil and honey doesn't go so well on your breakfast bread.

    >
    >I know. :)
    >That's why I added "in most cases". I was just thinking of that.
    >
    >I doubt spreads taste as good as butter though.
    >On bread, I prefer a smaller amount of the real thing, butter.
    >Then, I don't eat bread and butter everyday.
    >
    >With all other foods, I use uncooked olive oil.
    >
    >What strikes me is that AHA doesn't even mention olive oil.
    >
    >And they don't mention nichel in margarines.


    Unbelievable commentary.
    --
    Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA jchinnis@alum.mit.edu
     
  5. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 01:46:07 GMT, Jim Chinnis wrote in
    <news:vhgka1lvejn7uug5uap65dipn2vhuqmtig@4ax.com> on sci.med.nutrition :

    [...snip...]
    >>And they don't mention nichel in margarines.

    >
    > Unbelievable commentary.


    Don't industries use nickel or other metals in fat hydrogenation?


    --
    Enrico C
    ==================================
     
  6. On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 10:20:58 +0200, "MMu" <brilhasti@gmx.net> wrote:

    >you you aware that butter contains trans fats as well?


    Are literature agreeing about CLA is very unhealthful (the transfat in
    butter)
     
  7. MMu

    MMu Guest

    "Alf Christophersen" <alf.christophersen@medisin.uio.no> schrieb im
    Newsbeitrag news:u7ijb1hmoj3gd50cjrmhvvt15273nfvgq1@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 10 Jun 2005 10:20:58 +0200, "MMu" <brilhasti@gmx.net> wrote:
    >
    >>you you aware that butter contains trans fats as well?

    >
    > Are literature agreeing about CLA is very unhealthful (the transfat in
    > butter)


    is this a question whether CLA is a problem? your sentence is hard to
    interpret but in any case:
    cla is not the only trans fat in butter.
     

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