Re: Any food or herbs that really lower chol. ?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Marshall Price, Apr 29, 2006.

  1. And it's getting harder to find high-dosage niacin tablets. I used to
    get half-gram tablets for under a penny apiece at Willner's; later I
    bought them cheaply enough from Fedco (aka FDC), but the latter
    discontinued them and seem to think that "anti-flush niacin"
    (nicotinamide or inositol hexanicotinate) is just as good.

    Not so. Humphrey Osmond, who discovered the effect (around 1955, I
    think), still says it's got to be real niacin (nicotinic acid). I
    suspect the flush itself is connected somehow to the effect.

    I used *niacin*, *pyridoxine*, and *oat bran* to lower my LDL and raise
    my HDL cholesterol levels greatly in one month, enough to amaze my
    doctor, while evading a lifelong dependency on statins.

    But the efficacy of these common supplements is well known. I still
    can't understand why I had to bring them to my doctor's attention (he'd
    heard of them already, and knew them to be effective) rather than the
    other way around. It's hard to believe that he'd have put me on a
    prescription just to make more money. But what other explanation is there?

    That's not just a rhetorical question; I'd really like to know.


    George Cherry wrote:
    > "John Sankey" <bf250@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
    > news:dup6u3$3b3$1@theodyn.ncf.ca...
    >
    >>niacin

    >
    > It's tricky to use it in doses large enough to
    > get the sought medical effect.


    --
    Marshall Price of Miami
    Known to Yahoo as d021317c
     
    Tags:


  2. 2tone

    2tone Guest

    Marshall Price wrote:
    > And it's getting harder to find high-dosage niacin tablets. I used to
    > get half-gram tablets for under a penny apiece at Willner's; later I
    > bought them cheaply enough from Fedco (aka FDC), but the latter
    > discontinued them and seem to think that "anti-flush niacin"
    > (nicotinamide or inositol hexanicotinate) is just as good.
    >
    > But the efficacy of these common supplements is well known. I still
    > can't understand why I had to bring them to my doctor's attention (he'd
    > heard of them already, and knew them to be effective) rather than the
    > other way around. It's hard to believe that he'd have put me on a
    > prescription just to make more money. But what other explanation is there?
    >
    > That's not just a rhetorical question; I'd really like to know.
    >
    >



    Its the power of training .. even pavlov himself got trained .
    The doctors only know what they know.. go visit a university medical
    library during examination prep .. thesy are all reading from the same
    txts on the same shelves.. the only know what they know .

    I just got some Niacin from Vitacost .. thought it was a good deal
    although i almost doubled the price with postage to new zealand ..

    I agree with the intuition that the skin flush *(release of histamines)
    is a positive symptom of the niacin affecting the skin for a start ..

    http://www.vitacost.com/NSIVitaminB3Niacin
     
  3. Marshall Price wrote:

    > Not so. Humphrey Osmond, who discovered the effect (around 1955, I
    > think), still says it's got to be real niacin (nicotinic acid). I
    > suspect the flush itself is connected somehow to the effect.


    Anybody who cannot find IR niacin supplements is NOT trying very hard.
    The flush free varieties are positively dangerous, although there is a
    prescription form of it that is supposedly magically okay. Quite
    frankly, I rather doubt it.

    IR niacin is okay, but you certainly don't want to go over 1,500 mg a
    day of the stuff unless you want to destroy your liver.

    > I used *niacin*, *pyridoxine*, and *oat bran* to lower my LDL and raise
    > my HDL cholesterol levels greatly in one month, enough to amaze my
    > doctor, while evading a lifelong dependency on statins.


    Who do you think that you are kidding? Yeah, cholesterol control is
    just a game that you play with magic pills.

    Ha, ... Hah, Ha!

    You have my condolences.
     
  4. "seem to think that "anti-flush niacin" (nicotinamide or inositol
    hexanicotinate) is just as good."

    The former is known not to have the lipid effect and is not "flush free"
    and in fact doesn't cause any flush at all. The latter does have the
    lipid effect with some studies suggesting even more of the lipid control
    effect. The latter is niacin, it is an ester combination which over time
    reverts to the two elements leaving pure niacin. Because it takes time for
    this to happen the "flush" is much less.
     

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