Reasons to be crankful, part 3.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin Blackburn, Nov 8, 2004.

  1. Actually, it's parts 1 and 2 that are the problem. I am currently
    stripping two old bikes back to frame and forks and I'm too crankful to
    the tune of three.

    Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took the
    chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on the crank.
    Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in a maintenance
    book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank on the underside.
    Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel, hit the eff out of it
    from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre and
    rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.

    Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    effective that would be.

    Any tips?

    Colin
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 09:40:37 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:

    >Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took the
    >chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on the crank.
    >Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in a maintenance
    >book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank on the underside.
    >Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel, hit the eff out of it
    > from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre and
    >rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.


    Option 1) Depending on your bottom bracket design, remove the bracket
    from the drive-side. If the non-drive side of the BB is plastic then
    this is easier to remove by forceful means than removing the crank by
    forceful means. Although if your hybrid is indeed "old" then it is
    likely to have a metal threaded device each side :(

    Option 2) If the crank is aluminium then take a hacksaw and sacrific
    the crank in the name of the Lord Dog of the Darkside and continue to
    worship the undamaged frame..

    >Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    >covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    >the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    >inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    >bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    >effective that would be.


    Option 1) Smash the cap even more and lever it out with a screwdriver.
    How about a small file?

    Option 2) Gouge it out with a pair of pliers.

    Option 3) Bodge two holes across the diameter and near to the
    circumference. Insert the two points of needle-nose pliers and use it
    like a screwdriver.
    --
    If, as Einstein said, space is curved and occupies ten
    dimensions including time; How can you be certain which
    is the underneath of a ladder? And how can you be certain
    you haven't already walked under one next week?
    Extract teeth to reply
     
  3. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Colin Blackburn" <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote in message
    news:eek:psg43tzcsyxrafp@nntphost.dur.ac.uk...
    >
    > Actually, it's parts 1 and 2 that are the problem. I am currently
    > stripping two old bikes back to frame and forks and I'm too crankful to
    > the tune of three.
    >
    > Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took the
    > chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on the crank.
    > Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in a maintenance
    > book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank on the underside.
    > Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel, hit the eff out of it
    > from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre and
    > rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.


    It's certainly an idea.

    Can you get the BB out? Can you sacrifice the BB (or is it one of the bits
    you're after)?

    One thing you can do is with your handy angle grinder chop the bb axle off
    near the crank. Then you can hammer the stub of axle out in the vice (easy).

    I also once built a puller.

    > Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    > covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    > the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    > inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    > bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    > effective that would be.


    Can you create a screwdriver slot?
    Melt the cap and you'll fill the threads with goop, which will annoy you
    come crank extractor time.
    Alternatively can you just screwdriver/cold chisel smash the rest of the cap
    off? You might just need to break the circle - the rest could follow.
    Aha - or unscrew by tapping with a screwdriver/cold chisel in the
    appropriate direction (use a little hammer).

    cheers,
    clive
     
  4. NC

    NC Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic
    > caps covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these
    > caps are the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means
    > the threads are inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a
    > socket in to remove the bolt. I dis think about melting out the
    > plastic but I'm not sure how effective that would be.


    1) Heat might work, but risks toxic fumes and messy gunge.
    2) Any form of cutting/deformation to get a nick into the ring of plastic -
    sharp small screwdriver, whatever, and then yank out with pliers. Aim is to
    either get something to grip or a cut through the ring of plastic to weaken
    it.
    3) Thin pliers applied end-on so each jaw rests into the plastic at 180
    degrees, initially push straight inwards to get small indents/holes, then
    rotate to unscrew ring outwards.
    4) tap out slowly using a small hammer and very fine punch or scriber (or
    small "not best" screwdriver) at an angle to encourage the cap remains to
    unscrew.

    A small solitary piece of damage in the crank extractor thread is unlikely
    to prevent the extractor from working properly, so whilst its wise to avoid
    damaging the thread, its not a total disaster if you do mark it.



    - Nigel


    --
    NC - Webmaster for http://www.2mm.org.uk/
    Replies to newsgroup postings to the newsgroup please.
     
  5. On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 10:03:21 -0000, Clive George <clive@xxxx-x.fsnet.co.uk>
    wrote:

    > Can you get the BB out? Can you sacrifice the BB (or is it one of the
    > bits
    > you're after)?


    I would like to keep the BB but at the end of the day it is the frame I'm
    after...

    > One thing you can do is with your handy angle grinder chop the bb axle
    > off
    > near the crank. Then you can hammer the stub of axle out in the vice
    > (easy).


    ....so using an angle grider is an option. If I get it off the crank arm
    will be going in the bin so I'm not worried about it after the grinding.

    Another option is just to leave the thing there!

    > Can you create a screwdriver slot?
    > Melt the cap and you'll fill the threads with goop, which will annoy you
    > come crank extractor time.


    Yes, I think that will be a big problem.

    > Alternatively can you just screwdriver/cold chisel smash the rest of the
    > cap
    > off? You might just need to break the circle - the rest could follow.
    > Aha - or unscrew by tapping with a screwdriver/cold chisel in the
    > appropriate direction (use a little hammer).


    It looks like the way, though with the experience of a damaged thread on
    the other bike I don't want to smash the thread on this one. In this case
    the BB was an almost certain sacrifice but now I have the bike stripped
    down it seems to be in pretty good nick so I'd like to thry to keep it.

    Colin
     
  6. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 09:40:37 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:


    >Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took the
    >chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on the crank.
    >Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in a maintenance
    >book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank on the underside.
    >Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel, hit the eff out of it
    > from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre and
    >rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.


    I'd be reaching for a good hacksaw at this point. Either saw through
    the crank arm at the union between it and the BB spindle, or just
    straight through the BB spindle itself, if you don't need to save it.

    >Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    >covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    >the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    >inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    >bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    >effective that would be.


    Glue something to the inside of the remains? Dab of araldite on a
    couple of panel pins, anything really, shouldn't need much torque to
    get it moved.


    --

    "It is mendacious to make moral distinction between the unspeakable
    brutality of terrorism and the indiscriminate carnage of war and occupation.
    Both kinds of violence are unacceptable. We cannot
    support one and condemn the other."

    Arundhati Roy



    Email address is spam trapped, to reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <opsg43tzcsyxrafp@nntphost.dur.ac.uk>, Colin Blackburn
    ('colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk') wrote:

    >
    > Actually, it's parts 1 and 2 that are the problem. I am currently
    > stripping two old bikes back to frame and forks and I'm too crankful
    > to the tune of three.
    >
    > Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took
    > the chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on
    > the crank. Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in
    > a maintenance book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank
    > on the underside. Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel,
    > hit the eff out of it


    Is it aluminium? If so, heat it rapidly (lots of heat). Then bang it.

    > from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre
    > and
    > rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.
    >
    > Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic
    > caps covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these
    > caps are the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the
    > threads are inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket
    > in to remove the bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but
    > I'm not sure how effective that would be.


    Cut (or melt) a slot in the plastic and use an tuppeny coin to unscrew
    'em.


    --
    simon@jasmine.org.uk (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    to err is human, to lisp divine
    ;; attributed to Kim Philby, oddly enough.
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 8/11/04 11:05 am, in article
    0gv362-a48.ln1@gododdin.internal.jasmine.org.uk, "Simon Brooke"
    <simon@jasmine.org.uk> wrote:

    > in message <opsg43tzcsyxrafp@nntphost.dur.ac.uk>, Colin Blackburn
    > ('colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk') wrote:
    >> Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took
    >> the chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on
    >> the crank. Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in
    >> a maintenance book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank
    >> on the underside. Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel,
    >> hit the eff out of it

    >
    > Is it aluminium? If so, heat it rapidly (lots of heat). Then bang it.
    >

    If it is aluminium then you should be able to melt it off with a reasonable
    blow torch. Alu should melt at around 350-500 C depending on the alloy. You
    probably won't damage the steel until you get well above that.

    The alternative is to rest the crank on something solid and then split it
    using a cold chisel and large hammer. If this doesn't work, use a bigger
    hammer.

    ...d
     
  9. Alex Ferrier

    Alex Ferrier Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >
    > Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    > covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    > the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    > inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    > bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    > effective that would be.
    >
    > Any tips?
    >


    Stud extractors?

    --
    Alex
    BMW R1150GS
    DIAABTCOD#3 MSWF#4 UKRMFBC#6 Ibw#35 BOB#8
    http://www.team-ukrm.co.uk
    Windy's "little soldier"
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 8/11/04 11:57 am, in article cmnn47$n0l$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk,
    "Alex Ferrier" <x@x.x> wrote:

    > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >>
    >> Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    >> covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps are
    >> the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads are
    >> inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove the
    >> bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    >> effective that would be.
    >>
    >> Any tips?
    >>

    >
    > Stud extractors?


    That is a bit of over kill.

    Screwdriver embedded in the plastic and push. Warming with a hairdryer may
    help as well. The plastic should be fairly brittle or flexible. It won't be
    particularly strong so should yield to the appropriate degree of persuasion.

    ...d
     
  11. Alex Ferrier

    Alex Ferrier Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    >
    > Alex Ferrier wrote:
    >
    > > Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Bike 2. The old Peugeot road bike I found. On this one the plastic caps
    > >> covering the crank bolts have been smashed. Unfortunately, these caps

    are
    > >> the screw in type rather than the pop in ones. This means the threads

    are
    > >> inaccessible and there isn'y enough room to get a socket in to remove

    the
    > >> bolt. I dis think about melting out the plastic but I'm not sure how
    > >> effective that would be.
    > >>
    > >> Any tips?
    > >>

    > >
    > > Stud extractors?

    >
    > That is a bit of over kill.
    >


    Probably. I was just perusing the contents of my toolkit
    (biased mainly towards motorcycle work). If he has a
    set, of suitable sizes, they might do the trick.

    --
    Alex
    BMW R1150GS
    DIAABTCOD#3 MSWF#4 UKRMFBC#6 Ibw#35 BOB#8
    http://www.team-ukrm.co.uk
    Windy's "little soldier"
     
  12. In article <opsg43tzcsyxrafp@nntphost.dur.ac.uk>, Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >
    >Actually, it's parts 1 and 2 that are the problem. I am currently
    >stripping two old bikes back to frame and forks and I'm too crankful to
    >the tune of three.
    >
    >Bike 1. An old hybrid partly cannibalised for the recumbent. I took the
    >chain ring crank off but the other one has a stripped thread on the crank.
    >Thus I can't use a crank extractor to remove it. One tip in a maintenance
    >book was to clamp the frame on its side with the crank on the underside.
    >Then, using a hammper and a blunt cold steel chisel, hit the eff out of it
    > from above. Apparently restricting the blows to close to the centre and
    >rotating it. This seems like it might take a lifetime.


    I recently managed to get a crank with stripped thread off with a three
    legged puller. Alternatively, with the chainring side off, can you get
    the bottom bearing bits undone enough to get the axle out and wack the
    crank separate from the frame?
    (My next stage was going to be a ball-joint seperator of the sort that looks
    like a two pronged fork with wedges for prongs.)
     
  13. On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 12:17:52 -0000, Alex Ferrier <x@x.x> wrote:

    > David Martin wrote:
    >>
    >> Alex Ferrier wrote:
    >>
    >> > Stud extractors?

    >>
    >> That is a bit of over kill.
    >>

    >
    > Probably. I was just perusing the contents of my toolkit
    > (biased mainly towards motorcycle work). If he has a
    > set, of suitable sizes, they might do the trick.



    As I don't know what they are I assume I don't have a set!

    Thanks to all for the various suggestions. Now I've finally put a decent
    light in the workshop I think a couple of nights banging, sawing and
    grinding are in prospect.

    Colin
     
  14. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Colin Blackburn colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk opined the following...
    > I think a couple of nights banging, sawing and
    > grinding are in prospect.


    Ooo! Sir! ;-)

    Jon
     
  15. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Colin Blackburn colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk opined the following...
    > I think a couple of nights banging, sawing and
    > grinding are in prospect.


    Ooo! Sir! ;-)

    Jon
     
  16. On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 14:14:48 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote in message
    <opsg5giyvlyxrafp@nntphost.dur.ac.uk>:

    >I think a couple of nights banging, sawing and grinding are in prospect.


    In honour of the 25th anniversary of Viz, I would like to take this
    opportunity to say: fnaar, fnaar.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  17. On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 20:42:47 -0000, Jon Senior
    <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> wrote:

    > Colin Blackburn colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk opined the following...
    >> I think a couple of nights banging, sawing and
    >> grinding are in prospect.

    >
    > Ooo! Sir! ;-)


    I specifically separated banging and grinding with sawing to reduce the
    innuendosity.

    Colin
     
  18. On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 10:37:40 -0000, "Colin Blackburn"
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:

    >I specifically separated banging and grinding with sawing to reduce the
    >innuendosity.


    Why bother? It was always doomed to fail! :)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
Loading...

Share This Page

Loading...