Tire pressure for a big fella

Discussion in 'Clydesdales 200lb / 90kg + riders' started by Audiokat, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. Audiokat

    Audiokat New Member

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    I'm curios if there are any out there that have done some thinking about tire pressure as an overweight rider.

    I'm 6'1 and about 280lbs. It seems to me that 90psi to a 180lb rider is likely going to be different than it would to be for a 280lb rider. I can only assume that the lower the pressure the more road surface contact and the more work needed to turn the pedal.

    Conversely it also seeks an overweight rider is putting more stress on a highly inflated tire. I currently keep my back tire at 110psi and front at about 100psi


    Do any hefty fellers out there go with higher pressure or am I just overthinking it.
     
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  2. Leo001

    Leo001 New Member

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    So I"m about 255, I stay right around the recommended pressure on the sidewall (max inflation) I font get many flats, I ride numerous types of bikes with varying tiers (road, hybrid and occupationally.
    mountain)
     
  3. Corzhens

    Corzhens Active Member

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    When I first started biking, I was a bit skinny so I have no problem with that. But when my friend came and rode my bike, I was teasing her that the tire of my bike is flat. That flat tire line is a normal joke to mean you are overweight. But seriously, I don't think the tires would complain unless you weight more than 200 pounds and that's not common for small people like us.
     
  4. Weatherby

    Weatherby Active Member

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    Go with a wider tire.

    28 mm or 32 mm width if your frame has the clearance
     
  5. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Active Member

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    I ride Continental Ultra Sport folding tires, and I keep my tires pumped up to 120 psi. Now, I don't check the inflation every day ,though. I always re-inflate on Friday night before Saturday's long ride.
     
  6. Rob Tunes

    Rob Tunes New Member

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    http://www.dorkypantsr.us/bike-tire-pressure-calculator.html

    I highly doubt you have the same loaded weight on each wheel, so you should not have the same pressure. If you ride a race bike, you may have 55/45 Rear/Front ratio, or perhaps a 60/40 ratio if you are on a more relaxed road bike. The best way to find out is to get a friend to help, and weigh each wheel with you on the bike , in kit. Be sure to level the wheel not being weighed. (A wall helps). Then, write down the loaded weight per wheel, and determine your ratio.

    Why? Rolling resistance on most tires only increases after a 15% "drop" in tire height, under load. That 15% "drop" varies by the width of the tire, as wider tires need less pressure to maintain that 85% height threshold.

    Determine the weight per loaded wheel, and then use the link. Use the pressures listed. I generally do, and add about 3 psi to each tire. I wouldn't recommend it if it didn't work for myself and my riding friends. Most of us used to run 105-120 psi based on our weight and what we "thought." Now, we run a proportional psi based on our weight, at least with some background information.

    If you are on this Clydesdale forum, you likely need 90-100 in the front, and 130+ in the rear. You'd be surprised how much nicer the bike rides, and you won't see any increase in harshness. I was skeptical about this method (180lbs) but it's worked well for me, both on 700x23's, 700x25's, and tubulars from 700x23 to 700x24.
     
    #6 Rob Tunes, Mar 20, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2016
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  7. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    Bah! People really overthink crap sometimes. Just use the recommended pressure on the sidewall and be done with it.
     
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  8. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    Your pressure is only too low if you are experiencing handling problems, excessive rolling resistance or pinch flats. I am 100+kgs and usually run the pressures at or near the max recommended for the tire on my 700x25c tires.
     
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  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    No you cannot use the recommended psi on the sidewall, bike tires are a lot like car tires. Inflation of a car tire is based on the weight of the vehicle which is why you look on the door sticker to get the PSI they recommend regardless of the fact the max pressure on the car tire may be 45 or so. Bicycle tires are the same way, the problem is bikes don't come with a sticker because the bike's weight is not as important as the rider's weight but both are added into the calculation. So what is the recommended PSI for a rider vs the tire size? see this calculator, but use the second one only:

    http://www.dorkypantsr.us/bike-tire-pressure-calculator.html

    So how this works is you enter the total weight of your bike in ready to ride condition and your weight with cycling clothes on and enter that total in the first box. Skip the second box. In the third box you enter your front tire size, and do the same for the fifth box for the rear tire. When you finish that the calculator automatically calculates your idea pressure give or take 5 psi depending on your own personal likes of how a tire should feel or road conditions, rough roads you should drop the psi by 5, in rain as much as 10 drop, on very smooth streets a 5 psi increase could be fine.

    Now note those PSI figures, if they exceed the maximum psi on the tire label then you need the next size up, so to find out if the next size up works simply go to the drop down and enter the next size up tire, if it still exceeds the max rated psi then go to the next size up. On my commuter bike I have a wider tire on the back then in the front, you can do that too but you won't be able to rotate tires (more on that at the end of this). You can see from the calculator the front tire doesn't need to be as wide as the rear IF you don't want it to be.

    The subject of rotating, some people do and some don't there is no right or wrong. What I do is when the rear tire wears out I move the front to the rear and put a new one on the front since a front flat is potentially the most dangerous. However on my commuter I have two different size tires, what happens in this case is the rear tire will last close to same as the front because of the size difference, so I don't rotate those tires. If by chance the front tire does last longer then I'll put it on another bike. Again this is just how I do it, others don't rotate at all, but I'm a tightwad and I get as many miles as I can from a tire instead of throwing away a half worn front just because the rear is worn out.
     
  10. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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  11. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    120 psi for 20 years, never a problem on trail or paved roads. 35 centuries, numerous rides through the mountain roads. Never a problem in 80,000+ miles that I have logged.
     
  12. Brent Lytle

    Brent Lytle New Member

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    I weigh 315lb. I run 28mm tires. 100psi front, 110psi rear. 2500miles this year so far. No pinch flats. I’m sure my rolling resistance is way higher than a 150lb guy, but I can move along between 18-20mph on the flats. Now that’s a tire torture test!
     
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