tools

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Doobrie, Jul 11, 2003.

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  1. Doobrie

    Doobrie Guest

    being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?

    im only doing very low milage at the moment (5 mile rides and going to try 10 mile this weekend and
    take it easy)and this weekend im fitting my cycle computer that arrived this morning and made me
    wonder what i should carry around with me

    i have a small pump connected to the bike with my water bottle so a couple of spare innertubes would
    be worthwhile i guess along with some tools to get the tires off and wheels ... and some sort of
    general multitool for slight adjustments ... anything else? recommendations?

    im no mechanic and dont really like getting my hands dirty if i can help it, but have changed
    tubes etc in the past as a kid on front and rear wheels ... so anything that'll make life easier
    in this respect!

    also, ive seen little compressed air cannisters for blowing up the tyre
    - are they any good?
     
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  2. doobrie wrote:

    > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?

    I carry:

    - pump
    - a spare inner tube or two
    - p+nct+r+ repair kit (just in case)
    - tyre levers
    - four-bit screwdriver which my sister gave me for Christmas (smallest screwdriver useful for
    digging glass out of tyres)
    - Halfords multiple allen-key/screwdriver thingy
    - pliers
    - spare gear cable
    - chain rivet extractor

    > also, ive seen little compressed air cannisters for blowing up the tyre - are they any good?

    I have never tried them, and while some swear /by/ them, others swear /at/ them. And should you run
    out of canisters (which usually contain CO2, BTW), you are stuffed.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  3. John B

    John B Guest

    doobrie wrote:

    > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?
    >
    > im only doing very low milage at the moment (5 mile rides and going to try 10 mile this weekend
    > and take it easy)and this weekend im fitting my cycle computer that arrived this morning and made
    > me wonder what i should carry around with me
    >

    I'm presently ding the same distance each day for a fortnight, chaperoning my daughter to her work
    experience - 5 miles each way twice a day. In my bag at the moment I have:

    1 x inner tube 1 x p**nct*r* outfit 3 x tyre levers 1 x Alien Multitool 1 x crank extractor tool
    (rarely ever needed, but its a habit) 1 x crank bolt allen key (ditto) 1 x small adjustable spanner
    1 x small piece of chain - (4 links long) 3 x zip ties

    1 x compressed air canister [1]

    1 x mobile phone 1 x digital camera 1 x Palm PDA 1 x wallet (hopefully with some money) 1
    x bike lock

    2 x old choc bar wrappers

    1 x pump attached to bike

    > also, ive seen little compressed air cannisters for blowing up the tyre
    > - are they any good?

    [1] I have one of these. I received it as a birthday pressie once and have never used it so I don't
    know if it works. I'll probably find out someday, but only if I have left my pump at home.

    John B
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    doobrie wrote:
    > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?
    >
    > im only doing very low milage at the moment (5 mile rides and going to try 10 mile this weekend
    > and take it easy)and this weekend im fitting my cycle computer that arrived this morning and made
    > me wonder what i should carry around with me

    This little lot should do fine to begin with............

    . pump
    . 1 spare inner tube
    . tyre levers
    . puncture kit
    . set of metric allen keys (these are the most useful tools on modern bikes)
    . small screwdriver
    . 1 or 2 small spanners if your bike takes them and is likey to need them (or alternatively a
    multi-tool).

    That can be added to as mileage and maintenance skills increase.

    > also, ive seen little compressed air cannisters for blowing up the tyre are they any good?

    Probably (I've not used them) but you'll still need a pump as well in case you run out of
    cannisters.

    Not if you mean Tyre Weld or any similar product which is supposed to seal punctures (after the
    event). It's very very messy and doesn't work half the time at least.

    ~PB
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Pete Biggs <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    : This little lot should do fine to begin with............
    [snip]

    I'm going to disagree with everyone else here. If you are only doing 5-10 miles then all you need is

    * two spare inner tubes of the correct size [1]
    * two/three tyre levers
    * one pump

    I'd really only worry about more if you go further, in which case add a bit of cash and a multitool.
    Remember that a multitool is of no use unless you know how to use it though

    For rides of up to 200k (as long as I do), all I take is

    * two tubes
    * pump
    * tyre levers
    * some money if there's a cafe stop, £1 for emergencys otherwise
    * KoolTool multi-tool
    * type boots (park)
    * some Park instant patches for dire emergancies.

    If your bike is well to start with, you don't need much.

    Arthur

    [1] A once ordered a load of spare tubes mail-order, grabbed a couple to go on a ride. Had a
    puncture and then realised that I'd been sent 650c tubes my mistake. Much swearing ensued until
    I could borrow a spare tube!

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:

    > This little lot should do fine to begin with............
    >
    > . pump
    > . 1 spare inner tube
    > . tyre levers
    > . puncture kit
    > . set of metric allen keys (these are the most useful tools on modern bikes)
    > . small screwdriver
    > . 1 or 2 small spanners if your bike takes them and is likey to need them (or alternatively a
    > multi-tool).

    Yup, a good list. Note that the "multi tool" Pete mentions at the bottom there will usually have the
    allens (hex keys) and quite possibly a screwdriver or two as well, so if you get one you won't need
    those separately. Multi-tools range from simple to including a kitchen sink, but I can highly
    recommend having at least all your allen keys in one place (i.e., on one tool) as it makes
    individual keys harder to lose. The simplest multis are indeed just a set of allen keys in a fold
    out case, and as the man says, these are the most useful tools in most cases. I have a Topeak Alien
    XS multi: nice bit of kit IMHO :)

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. Doobrie

    Doobrie Guest

    thanks for the pointers folks ... now, what do i keep this stuff in!! ;)

    one thing just leads to another, eh .... i dont fancy wearing a back pack so some sort of bike
    attached storage ... bike has a rack and guards so could have something small fitted to that or
    maybe those under the seat type small bags .... recommendations on these or are they generic enough
    to just buy whatever suits?
     
  8. doobrie wrote:

    > one thing just leads to another, eh .... i dont fancy wearing a back pack so some sort of bike
    > attached storage ...

    Quite right too. Backpacks and bicycles go together like food and Marmite
    :)

    > bike has a rack and guards so could have something small fitted to that or maybe those under the
    > seat type small bags .... recommendations on these or are they generic enough to just buy
    > whatever suits?

    I keep mine in an ancient Trek underseat bag (except the pump, obv), but since most of my riding is
    on the Dark Side, it lives in my tailbox rather than under the seat. Otherwise it lurks at the
    bottom of a pannier hoping not to be needed. I should imagine there to be little or no diference
    between models save price and size.

    If you're wanting to carry anything else on the bike, panniers are, IMHO, better coz they're easier
    to remove than saddlebags, handlebar bags, rack-top bags, etc.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  9. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    doobrie wrote:
    > thanks for the pointers folks ... now, what do i keep this stuff in!! ;)
    >
    > one thing just leads to another, eh .... i dont fancy wearing a back pack so some sort of bike
    > attached storage ... bike has a rack and guards so could have something small fitted to that or
    > maybe those under the seat type small bags .... recommendations on these or are they generic
    > enough to just buy whatever suits?

    The seat packs that mount under the back of the saddle are pretty good for this sort of thing: you
    can't get *that* much in them, but that certainly doesn't exclude a toolkit as they don't bulk that
    much... They are pretty generic IME: just have a look in the shop, make sure your choice of tools
    will fit, and Robert's your parent's male sibling.

    Since I personally rarely ride anywhere without at least one pannier I just leave my tools in a
    pocket of one, but you probably wouldn't want to do this unless you were going to take the pannier
    anyway. Same would go for rack packs.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  10. Mark D

    Mark D Guest

    doobrie wrote:
    > thanks for the pointers folks ... now, what do i keep this stuff
    in!!
    > ;)
    >
    > one thing just leads to another, eh .... i dont fancy wearing a back pack so some sort of bike
    > attached storage ... bike has a rack and guards so could have something small fitted to that or
    > maybe those under the seat type small bags .... recommendations on these or are they generic
    > enough to just buy whatever suits?

    I find that the little underseat wedge packs are ideal for carrying all this sort of stuff. You may
    add/remove rack/pannier case/whatever, but the seatpack stays attached to the seat and is never
    forgotten. I remove the saddle and seatpost when I leave the bike, so this lot comes with me.
    There's probably room for only one tube in most of the smaller ones.

    They're all basically the same. In addition to most of the otehr posters items carried, I usually
    have a folding multitool (Leatherman type thing) for pliers, a few SRAM powerlinks for chain
    repairs, and a rear LED in case I get stranded/lost and it gets dark. For this reason I have a
    seatpack with an LED tab.

    --

    Regards,

    Mark Davies
     
  11. Peter Clinch wrote:
    > The simplest multis are indeed just a set of allen keys in a fold out case, and as the man says,
    > these are the most useful tools in most cases. I have a Topeak Alien XS multi: nice bit of kit
    > IMHO :)
    >

    They also have bottle openers which are pretty essential and I am dissapointed to see that no one
    else remembered this fact. Be aware however that a multi-tool can lead people to think that you are
    in fact some sort of MacGyver.

    So that can be simplified to:

    1 x pump. 1 x box of patches. 4 x chain links. 1 x inner tube. 1 x MacGyver special. (20+
    function Alien).

    This kit will should allow you to sort your bike out and or escape from mountain fortresses.
     
  12. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    doobrie wrote:
    > one thing just leads to another, eh .... i dont fancy wearing a back pack so some sort of bike
    > attached storage ... bike has a rack and guards so could have something small fitted to that or
    > maybe those under the seat type small bags .... recommendations on these or are they generic
    > enough to just buy whatever suits?

    Whatever suits, really. One of those little wedge bags would be ideal for the small tool kit
    recommended.

    A belt pack or small "bum bag" is an alternative if don't want to use wedge/saddle bag for any
    reason (I don't because one would foul stuff on my seatpost rack). Not too uncomfortable and means
    the items are highly accessible and secure (wallet & keys are included) - better than using pockets.

    ~PB
     
  13. Mark Burch

    Mark Burch Guest

    I carry a pump, spare inner tube, tyre levers and a list of cycle shops. I used to carry a spanner
    and an Allen key but I found that I never used them. I should probably carry more but I wouldn't
    know how to use it (if it wasn't for people like me many local bike shops would be out of business!)

    Mark Burch (about 3000 mpy)

    "doobrie" <doobreee@DELETEyahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1978a476ff48a149989721@news.gradwell.com...
    > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?
     
  14. M Series

    M Series Guest

    I carry a spare inner tube, puncture repair kit, chain splitting tool, allen key set, tyre levers
    including my new var 525, frame fitting pump. Also in my saddle bag or packet is some money for
    drinks and a slip of paper with my name and address on (I usually ride alone so if anything
    happens ...)

    "doobrie" <doobreee@DELETEyahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1978a476ff48a149989721@news.gradwell.com...
    > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?
    >
    > im only doing very low milage at the moment (5 mile rides and going to try 10 mile this weekend
    > and take it easy)and this weekend im fitting my cycle computer that arrived this morning and made
    > me wonder what i should carry around with me
    >
    > i have a small pump connected to the bike with my water bottle so a couple of spare innertubes
    > would be worthwhile i guess along with some tools to get the tires off and wheels ... and some
    > sort of general multitool for slight adjustments ... anything else? recommendations?
    >
    > im no mechanic and dont really like getting my hands dirty if i can help it, but have changed
    > tubes etc in the past as a kid on front and rear wheels ... so anything that'll make life easier
    > in this respect!
    >
    > also, ive seen little compressed air cannisters for blowing up the tyre
    > - are they any good?
     
  15. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Daniel Wilcox" <dvw269k@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message news:bemkhf$m8u$1@jura.cc.ic.ac.uk...
    > Peter Clinch wrote:
    > > The simplest multis are indeed just a set of allen keys in a fold
    out
    > > case, and as the man says, these are the most useful tools in most
    cases.
    > > I have a Topeak Alien XS multi: nice bit of kit IMHO :)
    > >
    > They also have bottle openers which are pretty essential and I am dissapointed to see that no one
    > else remembered this fact. Be aware however that a multi-tool can lead people to think that you
    > are in fact some sort of MacGyver.

    The bottle opener is the most useful single tool on the Alien family. However, a major downer is
    that several of said family have a (jolly useful) locking knife blade. This means that they qualify,
    under the enlightened terms of the Criminal Justice Bill, as an Offensive Weapon, with all the
    paperwork and court appearances that that entails.

    It's probably a bad idea to have one of these in your seatpack when you collide with a car and get
    breathalysed....

    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
  16. John B

    John B Guest

    Mark South wrote:

    >
    >
    > The bottle opener is the most useful single tool on the Alien family. However, a major downer is
    > that several of said family have a (jolly useful) locking knife blade. This means that they
    > qualify, under the enlightened terms of the Criminal Justice Bill, as an Offensive Weapon, with
    > all the paperwork and court appearances that that entails.
    >
    > It's probably a bad idea to have one of these in your seatpack when you collide with a car and get
    > breathalysed....

    Eeeek.

    I did.

    John B
     
  17. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:19:42 +0100, Mark South <marksouth@null.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > The bottle opener is the most useful single tool on the Alien family. However, a major downer is
    > that several of said family have a (jolly useful) locking knife blade. This means that they
    > qualify, under the enlightened terms of the Criminal Justice Bill, as an Offensive Weapon, with
    > all the paperwork and court appearances that that entails.
    >
    > It's probably a bad idea to have one of these in your seatpack when you collide with a car and get
    > breathalysed....
    >
    This came up on the IAM forum a few weeks ago and a (former?) serving police officer stated that
    this was rubbish provided a) the blade was less than 3 (2?) inches and b) it wasn't a flick knife
    and c) you didn't carry it with the intent to use it to do harm.

    However, c) is an important one. If, when the police ask why you are carrying a knife you say "for
    self defence" then that, in and of itself, is sufficient to establish that you are carrying it
    "with intent".

    (This does not mean that you couldn't use it for self defence if it so happened to be in your hand
    at the time that someone attacked you.)

    Unfortunately, I have deleted the message so I can't check up on the various question marks above.

    Regards,

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  18. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Tim Woodall must be edykated coz e writed:

    > On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:19:42 +0100, Mark South <marksouth@null.invalid> wrote:
    >>
    >> The bottle opener is the most useful single tool on the Alien family. However, a major downer is
    >> that several of said family have a (jolly useful) locking knife blade. This means that they
    >> qualify, under the enlightened terms of the Criminal Justice Bill, as an Offensive Weapon, with
    >> all the paperwork and court appearances that that entails.
    >>
    >> It's probably a bad idea to have one of these in your seatpack when you collide with a car and
    >> get breathalysed....
    >>
    > This came up on the IAM forum a few weeks ago and a (former?) serving police officer stated that
    > this was rubbish provided a) the blade was less than 3 (2?) inches and b) it wasn't a flick knife
    > and c) you didn't carry it with the intent to use it to do harm. Regards,
    >
    > Tim.
    I always carry a Gerber multitool on by belt, which includes a knife blade, I would never use it on
    a person, far to slow and messy, in this weather it is on open display, it has "Gerber legendary
    blades" emblazoned on the carry pouch, I have never been challenged by Police or anyone for
    carrying it, the only comments I have had are from people saying how useful it is when I use it to
    fix something, like when I recently opened a jammed cash box in church during a show.

    Ian
     
  19. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Tim Woodall" <devnull@locofungus.org> wrote in message
    news:slrnbgvor5.3hb.devnull@pauli.locofungus.org...
    > On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 21:19:42 +0100, Mark South <marksouth@null.invalid> wrote:
    > >
    > > The bottle opener is the most useful single tool on the Alien
    family.
    > > However, a major downer is that several of said family have a (jolly useful) locking knife
    > > blade. This means that they qualify, under
    the
    > > enlightened terms of the Criminal Justice Bill, as an Offensive
    Weapon,
    > > with all the paperwork and court appearances that that entails.
    > >
    > > It's probably a bad idea to have one of these in your seatpack when
    you
    > > collide with a car and get breathalysed....
    > >
    > This came up on the IAM forum a few weeks ago and a (former?) serving police officer stated that
    > this was rubbish provided a) the blade was less than 3 (2?) inches and b) it wasn't a flick knife
    > and c) you
    didn't
    > carry it with the intent to use it to do harm.

    The operative word in the above is "locking". Your blade of less than 3 inches may be deemed legal
    provided it doesn't lock.

    And I would ask who decides whether you are carrying with intent....

    > However, c) is an important one. If, when the police ask why you are carrying a knife you say "for
    > self defence" then that, in and of
    itself,
    > is sufficient to establish that you are carrying it "with intent".

    Oh they'd love it if you said that!

    > (This does not mean that you couldn't use it for self defence if it so happened to be in your hand
    > at the time that someone attacked you.)

    Of course if you kill them you'll be up for murder.

    > Unfortunately, I have deleted the message so I can't check up on the various question marks above.

    The whole subject is terribly unedifying I'm sorry to say.

    > God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J +
    @D/@t,"
    > and there was light.

    I'm sure God would have expressed the Maxwell equations using calculus of forms :)

    --
    Mark South: Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net "I wonder why so many Finnish traditions are
    related with booze?"
    - Juha Sakkinen
     
  20. Tony R

    Tony R Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:bem7p7$6mv6v$1@ID-144931.news.uni-berlin.de...
    > doobrie wrote:
    > > being a complete newbie what tools/bits should i carry around with me?
    > >

    >
    > This little lot should do fine to begin with............
    >
    > . pump
    > . 1 spare inner tube
    > . tyre levers
    > . puncture kit
    > . set of metric allen keys (these are the most useful tools on modern bikes)
    > . small screwdriver
    > . 1 or 2 small spanners if your bike takes them and is likey to need them (or alternatively a
    > multi-tool).
    >
    > That can be added to as mileage and maintenance skills increase.
    >
    ........
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    To which I would add two small things - a disposable plastic glove for dealing with filthy chains
    roadside and a spare tube of patch glue. Once after a long stretch between punctures I discovered
    the one in my repair kit had dried up. tony R.
     
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