TR - Munros - Bidein a'Choire Sheasgaich and Lurg Mhor

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Lindsay, Jul 24, 2007.

  1. Lindsay

    Lindsay Guest

    Bidein a'Choire Sheasgaich and Lurg Mhor
    15 - 16 July 2007
    We met in Inverness on the afternoon of the 15 July and drove to Craig
    near Achnashellach where we parked in the car park within the forest
    on the north side of the A890 Achnasheen to Lochcarron Road. The car
    park had recently been reduced in size and a height barrier installed
    at the entrance.
    We left the car park, crossed the main road and the railway line and
    followed the vehicle track east to the bridge over the River Carron.
    At the split in the track we took the one heading west through the
    forest and along the south bank of the River. After over three
    kilometres we reached the signposted path for Bearneas.
    The path climbed through the forest and in places long grass on either
    side of it hid deep trenches. Beyond the forest the path, which was
    boggy in places, wound its way uphill above Coire Leiridh, where we
    met a couple descending from the Corbett, Sgurr na Feartaig. The
    path led to a small bealach south of Carn Mor and then through some
    rocks to a wide area, which without the path would require some
    careful navigation.
    The path descended the side of a stream and some old fence posts to
    Bearneas Bothy. The bothy, which was situated in an idyllic
    location, was tidy and larger than expected but I had carried my tent
    so I pitched it nearby while my clients, Kay and Norman set up in the
    bothy. We cooked our meal and sat outside in the sun enjoying the
    weather conditions and the remoteness of the location, until the light
    breeze disappeared and a few midges decided to join us. The rest of
    the evening was spent in the bothy chatting and drinking tea and
    coffee.
    I was awake early and with the tent door open I watched the clouds
    change colour to orange as the sun rose. There was no problem from
    the midges as there was a breeze blowing but the higher hills were
    cloud covered. After an early breakfast we set off from the bothy
    and crossed the Abhainn Bhearnais by a few stones I had placed the
    previous evening. Beyond that the ground was fairly boggy and
    sections were impossible to cross and required slight deviations.
    Once the ground started to rise it was a bit drier underfoot. A
    stream was reached and a suitable crossing point found as it ran
    through a small gorge.
    We aimed for a tributary of the stream we had just crossed and
    followed it into Coire Seasgach and into the cloud. We spotted
    several deer in the area. In the Coire it was very atmospheric with
    the mist and rock making everything outsized. We followed the
    stream, which changed direction several times, until we reached a
    small lochan. Well the lochan was actually quite difficult to see in
    the thick cloud. Just beyond the lochan we came across a path that
    led along a narrowing and rocky ridge to the summit of Bidein a'Choire
    Sheasgaich where it was fairly windy.
    There was no advantage remaining at the summit so we continued on the
    path, which disappeared at times to the bealach with Lurg Mhor where
    it was very windy and a few minutes later the rain, that was to last
    the rest of the day, started. The ascent of Lurg Mhor commenced and
    before ten in the morning we had reached the summit of our second
    Munro of the day. Lurg Mhor was in fact Kay's final mainland Munro
    while it was Norman's one hundred and ninety seventh.
    The return to Bearneas Bothy was by the route of ascent. The cloud
    base hadn't changed but the level of the streams had risen. Once
    back at the bothy we had some lunch and hot drinks before packing our
    overnight gear. Unfortunately I should have taken my tent down in
    the morning as it was now very wet.
    We were about to leave the bothy when a chap walking from Cape Wrath
    arrived so we spoke to him for a few minutes. He was the only person
    we saw that day. After around an hour at the bothy we left to return
    to Craig by the route used the previous day but the path was very wet
    in places as the rain continued to fall.
    Kay plans to climb Sgurr nan Gillean next which will leave her with a
    visit to Mull to complete her Munros. Norman's next walk was an
    ascent of the two Munros of the Aonach Eagach.
    Time taken:
    Day one - 3.5 hours.
    Day two - 8.75 hours.

    Distance:
    Day one - 11 kilometres.
    Day two - 23 kilometres.

    Height climbed:
    Day one - 600 metres.
    Day two - 1420 metres.

    Photographs taken on walk can be viewed at:
    http://www.caledoniahilltreks.com/gallery07/lurg_mhor_july07/index.htm

    Lindsay
    www.caledoniahilltreks.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Fabulous write-up Lindsay, as always.

    An alternative route, for people with bikes, is to take the track from
    Attadale House to Bendronaig Lodge, and ascend the hills from there.
    The track is steep in places but perfectly cycleable, and it makes
    these two hills achievable in a day if you're short of time. In fact I
    drove from Perth and climbed these two hills before returning to
    Perth, all in the same day, without any difficulty.

    I'm not advocating the "climb by the easiest route" philosophy, but it
    enabled me to have a stunning blue-sky day on two fabulous hills on
    the one day I had off work mid-week.

    https://www.jimwillsher.co.uk/Includes/Display_Trip.php?AscentID=207


    Jim



    On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 14:40:54 -0700, Lindsay
    <lindsaycaledonia@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

    >Bidein a'Choire Sheasgaich and Lurg Mhor
    >15 - 16 July 2007
    >We met in Inverness on the afternoon of the 15 July and drove to Craig
    >near Achnashellach where we parked in the car park within the forest
    >on the north side of the A890 Achnasheen to Lochcarron Road. The car
    >park had recently been reduced in size and a height barrier installed
    >at the entrance.
    >We left the car park, crossed the main road and the railway line and
    >followed the vehicle track east to the bridge over the River Carron.
    >At the split in the track we took the one heading west through the
    >forest and along the south bank of the River. After over three
    >kilometres we reached the signposted path for Bearneas.
    >The path climbed through the forest and in places long grass on either
    >side of it hid deep trenches. Beyond the forest the path, which was
    >boggy in places, wound its way uphill above Coire Leiridh, where we
    >met a couple descending from the Corbett, Sgurr na Feartaig. The
    >path led to a small bealach south of Carn Mor and then through some
    >rocks to a wide area, which without the path would require some
    >careful navigation.
    >The path descended the side of a stream and some old fence posts to
    >Bearneas Bothy. The bothy, which was situated in an idyllic
    >location, was tidy and larger than expected but I had carried my tent
    >so I pitched it nearby while my clients, Kay and Norman set up in the
    >bothy. We cooked our meal and sat outside in the sun enjoying the
    >weather conditions and the remoteness of the location, until the light
    >breeze disappeared and a few midges decided to join us. The rest of
    >the evening was spent in the bothy chatting and drinking tea and
    >coffee.
    >I was awake early and with the tent door open I watched the clouds
    >change colour to orange as the sun rose. There was no problem from
    >the midges as there was a breeze blowing but the higher hills were
    >cloud covered. After an early breakfast we set off from the bothy
    >and crossed the Abhainn Bhearnais by a few stones I had placed the
    >previous evening. Beyond that the ground was fairly boggy and
    >sections were impossible to cross and required slight deviations.
    >Once the ground started to rise it was a bit drier underfoot. A
    >stream was reached and a suitable crossing point found as it ran
    >through a small gorge.
    >We aimed for a tributary of the stream we had just crossed and
    >followed it into Coire Seasgach and into the cloud. We spotted
    >several deer in the area. In the Coire it was very atmospheric with
    >the mist and rock making everything outsized. We followed the
    >stream, which changed direction several times, until we reached a
    >small lochan. Well the lochan was actually quite difficult to see in
    >the thick cloud. Just beyond the lochan we came across a path that
    >led along a narrowing and rocky ridge to the summit of Bidein a'Choire
    >Sheasgaich where it was fairly windy.
    >There was no advantage remaining at the summit so we continued on the
    >path, which disappeared at times to the bealach with Lurg Mhor where
    >it was very windy and a few minutes later the rain, that was to last
    >the rest of the day, started. The ascent of Lurg Mhor commenced and
    >before ten in the morning we had reached the summit of our second
    >Munro of the day. Lurg Mhor was in fact Kay's final mainland Munro
    >while it was Norman's one hundred and ninety seventh.
    >The return to Bearneas Bothy was by the route of ascent. The cloud
    >base hadn't changed but the level of the streams had risen. Once
    >back at the bothy we had some lunch and hot drinks before packing our
    >overnight gear. Unfortunately I should have taken my tent down in
    >the morning as it was now very wet.
    >We were about to leave the bothy when a chap walking from Cape Wrath
    >arrived so we spoke to him for a few minutes. He was the only person
    >we saw that day. After around an hour at the bothy we left to return
    >to Craig by the route used the previous day but the path was very wet
    >in places as the rain continued to fall.
    >Kay plans to climb Sgurr nan Gillean next which will leave her with a
    >visit to Mull to complete her Munros. Norman's next walk was an
    >ascent of the two Munros of the Aonach Eagach.
    >Time taken:
    >Day one - 3.5 hours.
    >Day two - 8.75 hours.
    >
    >Distance:
    >Day one - 11 kilometres.
    >Day two - 23 kilometres.
    >
    >Height climbed:
    >Day one - 600 metres.
    >Day two - 1420 metres.
    >
    >Photographs taken on walk can be viewed at:
    >http://www.caledoniahilltreks.com/gallery07/lurg_mhor_july07/index.htm
    >
    >Lindsay
    >www.caledoniahilltreks.com
     
  3. Jim Ford

    Jim Ford Guest

    Jim wrote:
    > Fabulous write-up Lindsay, as always.


    Yes, I wonder whether he's considered publishing his trail reports,
    paper or online?

    Jim Ford
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Jim Ford wrote:
    > Jim wrote:
    >> Fabulous write-up Lindsay, as always.

    >
    > Yes, I wonder whether he's considered publishing his trail reports,
    > paper or online?


    I guess he has, since he does! ;-)

    They're on his website at http://www.caledoniahilltreks.com

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     

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