Understanding Brits

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Jerry Neuburger, Apr 2, 2003.

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  1. I obviously watch way too much public T.V. here in the United States (the home away from home for
    the BBC). I can understand almost everything written on this site. At least as well as I could the
    girls from AbFab!
     
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  2. Panda

    Panda Guest

    well thats impressive, since i dont understand most of it!

    panda (a brit)

    "Jerry Neuburger" <gneuburg@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:WWLia.52$Li1.24@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
    > I obviously watch way too much public T.V. here in the United States (the home away from home for
    > the BBC). I can understand almost everything
    written
    > on this site. At least as well as I could the girls from AbFab!
     
  3. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Jerry Neuburger" <gneuburg@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:<WWLia.52$Li1.24@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com>...
    > I obviously watch way too much public T.V. here in the United States (the home away from home for
    > the BBC). I can understand almost everything written on this site. At least as well as I could the
    > girls from AbFab!

    After long exposure to American TV we've all learned to speak English.

    --
    Dave...
     
  4. "Jerry Neuburger" <gneuburg@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:<WWLia.52$Li1.24@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com>...
    > I obviously watch way too much public T.V. here in the United States (the home away from home for
    > the BBC). I can understand almost everything written on this site. At least as well as I could the
    > girls from AbFab!

    I didn't know AbFab made it to PBS. Last I remember it was just on Comedy Central.

    People make too much of this 'divided by a common language' nonsense, anyway. Nothing that a little
    sensitivity and attention can't solve.

    but then, I haven't seen anybody from Alabama try to talk to a Geordie, either.

    -Luigi neither here--nor there but a stranger everywhere
     
  5. >but then, I haven't seen anybody from Alabama try to talk to a Geordie, either.

    Noo pet, if yer from Geordieland, bonnie laad, then iffereebody taalks proppur like.

    Hawaay the laaads.

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  6. In article <308301c1.0304030409.41363e16@posting.google.com>, Luigi de Guzman
    <luigi12081@cox.net> writes
    >"Jerry Neuburger" <gneuburg@pacbell.net> wrote in message news:<WWLia.52$Li1.24@
    >newssvr16.news.prodigy.com>...
    >> I obviously watch way too much public T.V. here in the United States (the home away from home for
    >> the BBC). I can understand almost everything written on this site. At least as well as I could
    >> the girls from AbFab!
    >
    >I didn't know AbFab made it to PBS. Last I remember it was just on Comedy Central.
    >
    >People make too much of this 'divided by a common language' nonsense, anyway. Nothing that a little
    >sensitivity and attention can't solve.
    >
    >but then, I haven't seen anybody from Alabama try to talk to a Geordie, either.

    I have seen a Glaswegian trying to hold a conversation with a guy from the Deep South, with no
    success. Luckily there was a Dutchman available to translate between the two :)

    ttfn

    Martin

    --
    'Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy.' Steven Wright

    Martin Harlow martin@freedonia.demon.co.uk
     
  7. Al_mossah

    Al_mossah Guest

    Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin service
    director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily". The Brits immediately
    panic, assuming that the doors will open FOR a moment, whereas the Americans assume that they will
    open IN a moment.

    The Americans have "gotten" things, whereas we have "got" them. But we have "forgotten" things,
    whilst the Americans have "forgot" things.

    I love it.

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <wafflycathcs@aol.comtapeworm> wrote in message
    news:20030403071731.04594.00000203@mb-fr.aol.com...
    > >but then, I haven't seen anybody from Alabama try to talk to a Geordie, either.
    >
    > Noo pet, if yer from Geordieland, bonnie laad, then iffereebody taalks
    proppur
    > like.
    >
    > Hawaay the laaads.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s
    >
    >
    > ~~~~~~~~~~
    > Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending
    a
    > reply!
    >
    > Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the
    keyboaRRRDdd
    > ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    al_Mossah wrote:
    > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily".

    Not noticed that, but am always struck by being expected to "deplane". The biggest difference I
    usually notice is verbing nouns like that, aside from obvious pronunciation changes: once asked to
    get some bayzil and erraygenno from the erbs section in a shop had me a bit baffled at first!

    Verbing nouns only bothers me when it comes as part of management-speak. We're now expected to
    action things where we used to just do them which grates a bit, but trashing stuff is just fine...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "al_Mossah" <peterkmossnospam@nospambtopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:b6hait$hp$1@titan.btinternet.com...
    > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily". The Brits
    > immediately panic, assuming that the doors will open FOR a moment, whereas the Americans assume
    > that they will open IN a moment.
    >
    > The Americans have "gotten" things, whereas we have "got" them. But we
    have
    > "forgotten" things, whilst the Americans have "forgot" things.
    >
    > I love it.

    While the Germans were modifying the rules of spelling and grammar recently (well, within the last 6
    or 7 year) I was asked, in all seriousness, at a party who controlled the English language. They
    thought my initial laugh somewhat rude. I never did know if they fully appreciated the concept of
    anarchy that reigns supreme.

    Anyway, I have less problem with Americans than with my teenage nephew & niece -- who seem to speak
    a completely different argot.

    T
     
  10. In message <b6hbg7$52id3$1@ID-161007.news.dfncis.de>, Tony W <tonyREMOVE@chapmore.co.uk> writes
    >Anyway, I have less problem with Americans than with my teenage nephew & niece -- who seem to speak
    >a completely different argot.

    Well, if you go round using words like 'argot' an element of mutual incomprehensibility is
    understandable.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  11. In article <3E8C30A7.9010609@dundee.ac.uk>, p.j.clinch@dundee.ac.uk says...
    > al_Mossah wrote:
    > > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    > > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily".
    >
    > Not noticed that, but am always struck by being expected to "deplane".

    The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.

    Colin
     
  12. On Thu, 3 Apr 2003 14:35:58 +0100, Colin Blackburn <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:

    >> > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    >> > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily".
    >>
    >> Not noticed that, but am always struck by being expected to "deplane".
    >
    >The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.

    Come on now - on a Holts battlefield tour in Belgium we "de-bus" when alighting from the coach!

    --
    Hiram Hackenbacker
     
  13. In article <3e8c3baa.30094824@news.claranews.com>, brains@sky.com says...
    > On Thu, 3 Apr 2003 14:35:58 +0100, Colin Blackburn <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
    >
    > >> > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    > >> > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily".
    > >>
    > >> Not noticed that, but am always struck by being expected to "deplane".
    > >
    > >The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.
    >
    > Come on now - on a Holts battlefield tour in Belgium we "de-bus" when alighting from the coach!

    You alight. It's a perfectly good word. To bus is to move people about by bus, it isn't "to get on a
    bus", so I have no idea what debus, unbus or rebus mean. Perhaps you deboarded? De-unalighted?

    Colin
     
  14. Henry Braun

    Henry Braun Guest

    On Thu, 3 Apr 2003, Colin Blackburn wrote:
    > > Come on now - on a Holts battlefield tour in Belgium we "de-bus" when alighting from the coach!
    >
    > You alight. It's a perfectly good word. To bus is to move people about by bus, it isn't "to get on
    > a bus", so I have no idea what debus, unbus or rebus mean. Perhaps you deboarded? De-unalighted?

    A rebus is a word-puzzle, representing the sign by the thing signified, as any fule kno. And you
    missed out "zebus".

    From a bus, as from any other vehicle, you disembark. It's a slightly illogical term, if you're not
    aboard a bark (or vessel) to begin with, but no more so than for us cyclists to dismount.
     
  15. In message <MPG.18f64fae2c2a44349898b2@localhost>, Colin Blackburn
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> writes
    >I have no idea what debus, unbus or rebus mean.

    Rebus - a puzzle consisting of pictures, symbols, etc., representing syllables and words; a heraldic
    device that is a pictorial representation of the name of the bearer.

    Thought you might want to know that. On the other hand perhaps not! ;-)
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  16. Colin Blackburn <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
    >The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.

    I've a nasty suspicion they were addressed as "customers", too.
    --
    David Damerell <damerell@chiark.greenend.org.uk> Kill the tomato!
     
  17. In article <l8f*-cXOp@news.chiark.greenend.org.uk>, damerell@chiark.greenend.org.uk says...
    > Colin Blackburn <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
    > >The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.
    >
    > I've a nasty suspicion they were addressed as "customers", too.

    Yes, and he wasn't a guard either, he was the Customer Services Manager, apparently. He also wasn't
    popular since the detraining and subsequent retraining on a following service meant three trains
    worth of customers were crammed onto one customer translocation vehicle.

    Colin
     
  18. On Thu, 3 Apr 2003 15:04:09 +0100, Colin Blackburn <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> wrote:

    >> >> > Divided by a common language! Have you ever been on a US 'plane when, on landing, the cabin
    >> >> > service director informs the passengers that the doors will open "momentarily".
    >> >>
    >> >> Not noticed that, but am always struck by being expected to "deplane".
    >> >
    >> >The guard on a broken down Virgin train I was on invited the passengers to detrain. Ugh.
    >>
    >> Come on now - on a Holts battlefield tour in Belgium we "de-bus" when alighting from the coach!
    >
    >You alight. It's a perfectly good word. To bus is to move people about by bus, it isn't "to get on
    >a bus", so I have no idea what debus, unbus or rebus mean. Perhaps you deboarded? De-unalighted?

    I think the American's on the coach feel we "exited" the bus.

    --
    Hiram Hackenbacker
     
  19. In message <Pine.LNX.4.50.0304031520160.8066-100000@pac-man.maths.ox.ac.uk>, Henry Braun
    <braun@maths.ox.ac.uk> writes
    >From a bus, as from any other vehicle, you disembark.

    Not really. The etymology of 'embark' is via French from Old French and comes from barca, barque for
    boat so is normally applied only to boats and, for some reason, planes. You get on and off a bus or,
    possibly, board it and alight from it. Dismounting a bike makes perfect sense if you were previously
    mounted on it. How do you ride yours?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  20. In message <MPG.18f657cc719a7d69898b5@localhost>, Colin Blackburn
    <colin.blackburn@durham.ac.uk> writes
    >I would, perhaps, have been clearer saying, "I have no idea what de-bus, un-bus or re-bus mean."

    Yes, although according to my dictionary 'de-bus' would be wrong. It defines 'debus' as 'to unload
    (goods, etc.) or (esp. of troops) to alight from a bus'.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
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