vanilla ice cream, recipe request and questions

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scott, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Hello. I just picked up some vanilla beans from Penzeys, and I was
    wondering if anyone had a favorite bean-based vanilla ice cream recipe
    they could share?

    I'd heard that you should scrape the beans out, but then also cut the
    hull in half and use it to flavor the simmering cream, removing the two
    pieces before chilling. Most of the recipes I've seen don't call for
    this (they just use the scraped out inside). Either way, I'd use the
    hull for vanilla sugar (hopefully, I'll use that SOME day). Does also
    using using the hull really add anything?

    Also I was checking through the group archives, and I found the recipe
    printed below. Why would it call for bringing the half-and-half to a
    boil, then chilling it? I know some recipes call for scalding milk, but
    this doesn't seem to be for that reason.

    <http://tinyurl.com/7opqw>

    Greatest Vanilla Ice Cream
    1 cup plus 2 tablespoons half-and-half
    6 large egg yolks
    5 1/2 tablespoons sugar
    1 cup whipping cream
    5 1/2 tablespoons sugar
    1 whole vanilla bean, split down the center
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
    In small heavy-bottomed saucepan slowly bring half-and-half to boil.
    Place in refrigerator overnight, or chill in freezer briefly but do
    not freeze.
    Cream egg yolks and 5 1/2 tablespoons sugar; set aside.
    In 2-quart saucepan combine whipping cream, remaining sugar and
    vanilla bean and slowly bring to a boil, stirring frequently.  Remove
    bean; using point of paring knife, scrape vanilla grains from inside
    hull.  With fingers, rub off any cream or remaining vanilla grains and
    mix into cream.  [At this point, I return the cleaned vanilla pods to
    the cream.]
    Add about 1/3 of the cream mixture to yolks, whisking constantly.  
    Pour this mixture into saucepan, whisking constantly, and bring to
    just under boiling point.  Immediately place pan in cold water or over
    ice to stop cooking.  Stir frequently until cool.
    Strain through fine strainer or chinoise.  [After straining, I return
    the cleaned vanilla pods to the cream.]  Beat in chilled half-and-half
    and vanilla.  [Now I put the completed custard in the refrigerator
    overnight.  When I am ready to freeze the custard, I remove the
    vanilla pods and clean them with my fingertips to draw out more
    vanilla from the pods.  The pods can be discarded now.]  Place in ice
    cream maker and churn according to manufacturer's directions.

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
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  2. Here's my favorite vanilla ice cream recipe.

    2 C half and half
    1 vanilla bean
    4 egg yolks
    2/3 C sugar

    Heat cream and vanilla bean to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let
    sit 5 minutes. Remove bean and cut in half, scrape seeds from bean and
    add to hot cream.

    Beat egg yolks and sugar. Pour into half and half and cook over low
    heat, whisking until thick. Set pan into bowl of ice water to cool.
    Refrigerate at least one hour then pour into ice cream maker and freeze.

    marcella

    In article <heimdall-99BBDA.16440414082005@individual.net>,
    Scott <heimdall@spamless.invalid> wrote:

    > Hello. I just picked up some vanilla beans from Penzeys, and I was
    > wondering if anyone had a favorite bean-based vanilla ice cream recipe
    > they could share?
    >
    > I'd heard that you should scrape the beans out, but then also cut the
    > hull in half and use it to flavor the simmering cream, removing the two
    > pieces before chilling. Most of the recipes I've seen don't call for
    > this (they just use the scraped out inside). Either way, I'd use the
    > hull for vanilla sugar (hopefully, I'll use that SOME day). Does also
    > using using the hull really add anything?
    >
    > Also I was checking through the group archives, and I found the recipe
    > printed below. Why would it call for bringing the half-and-half to a
    > boil, then chilling it? I know some recipes call for scalding milk, but
    > this doesn't seem to be for that reason.
     
  3. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Scott wrote:


    > Also I was checking through the group archives, and I found the
    > recipe printed below. Why would it call for bringing the
    > half-and-half to a boil, then chilling it? I know some recipes call
    > for scalding milk, but this doesn't seem to be for that reason.



    Because it's a custard-based recipe, and you need the hot liquid to
    cook the eggs.



    Brian
     
  4. Scott

    Scott Guest

    In article <3mc1ghF15u71nU3@individual.net>,
    "Default User" <defaultuserbr@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Because it's a custard-based recipe, and you need the hot liquid to
    > cook the eggs.


    You didn't read the recipe instruction I asked about:
    "In small heavy-bottomed saucepan slowly bring half-and-half to boil.
    Place in refrigerator overnight, or chill in freezer briefly but do not
    freeze."

    Since the half-and-half is being heated then chilled without being used
    in any other way, what's the point?

    --
    to respond (OT only), change "spamless.invalid" to "optonline.net"

    <http://www.thecoffeefaq.com/>
     
  5. On Mon 15 Aug 2005 11:47:59a, Scott wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In article <3mc1ghF15u71nU3@individual.net>,
    > "Default User" <defaultuserbr@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Because it's a custard-based recipe, and you need the hot liquid to
    >> cook the eggs.

    >
    > You didn't read the recipe instruction I asked about:
    > "In small heavy-bottomed saucepan slowly bring half-and-half to boil.
    > Place in refrigerator overnight, or chill in freezer briefly but do not
    > freeze."
    >
    > Since the half-and-half is being heated then chilled without being used
    > in any other way, what's the point?
    >


    I have to admit that I misread the recipe incorrectly the first time, too,
    or I might have given the same answer. Dealing with two separate creams,
    here, the half and half and the whipping cream. Since the half and half is
    not being mixed with the eggs at that stage, there is absolutey no point in
    scalding it first.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Scott wrote:

    > Hello. I just picked up some vanilla beans from Penzeys, and I was
    > wondering if anyone had a favorite bean-based vanilla ice cream recipe
    > they could share?


    I used the one that came with my Cuisinart ice cream maker:

    Deluxe Vanilla Ice Cream

    2 cups whipping cream
    2 cups milk
    2 egg yolks
    1/2 cup sugar
    2 Tablespoons Vanilla extract
    1/2 Vanilla pod

    Put the milk and cream into a large sauce pan along with the vanilla bean
    over medium heat, stirring occasionally until scalded. Remove the vanilla
    pod, slit it open and scrap out the seeds. Add the seeds to the milk
    mixture.

    Beat egg yolks, sugar and vanilla extract together until light and fluffy.
    Slowly pour scaled milk into the egg mixture,, stirring constantly to
    temper the eggs, then add the egg mixture to the scaled milk. Stir
    constantly over low heat for about four minutes or until the custard coats
    the back of a spoon. Allow to cool and then refrigerate over night before
    going into the freezer unit.
     
  7. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Mon 15 Aug 2005 11:47:59a, Scott wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > In article <3mc1ghF15u71nU3@individual.net>,
    > > "Default User" <defaultuserbr@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Because it's a custard-based recipe, and you need the hot liquid to
    > >> cook the eggs.


    > > Since the half-and-half is being heated then chilled without being
    > > used in any other way, what's the point?
    > >

    >
    > I have to admit that I misread the recipe incorrectly the first time,
    > too, or I might have given the same answer. Dealing with two
    > separate creams, here, the half and half and the whipping cream.
    > Since the half and half is not being mixed with the eggs at that
    > stage, there is absolutey no point in scalding it first.



    Oh. Oops. In that case I don't know for sure what the purpose is.
    Scalding does change the character of milk or cream somewhat, but I
    wouldn't think it that important as to go through an extra step.




    Brian
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Scott wrote:

    >
    > You didn't read the recipe instruction I asked about:
    > "In small heavy-bottomed saucepan slowly bring half-and-half to boil.
    > Place in refrigerator overnight, or chill in freezer briefly but do not
    > freeze."
    >
    > Since the half-and-half is being heated then chilled without being used
    > in any other way, what's the point?


    That sounds like an unnecessary step. You certainly can't dump the egg
    yolks into the hot milk/cream because they will turn into scrambled egg
    yolk. Instead, you temper the beaten yolks by pouring the hot liquid slowly
    into the eggs while stirring.

    Milk contains enzymes that interfere with thickening. That may not be a
    problem with pasteurized milk since it has already been heated enough to
    destroy those enzymes, and all milk available commercially has been
    pasteurized. If you should ever try to make a custard type dish with egg
    and non pasteurized milk, then you will definitely need to scald it first.

    I always scald the milk when I make ice cream. I guess it is a force of
    habit enforced by the recipe. I have to heat the stuff anyway. If I make
    good vanilla I stick the vanilla bean in the milk while it is heating. If I
    am making chocolate, I am chopping up the chocolate while the milk is
    heating.
     

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